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Muyedobotongji (Intro)

Posted by Baconator, Aug 11 2011, 08:29 PM in Muyedobotongji

Muyedobotongji 무예도보통지


Excerpt from King's Forward

"...However, in striking inward and attacking outward, the hands and feets are the essential tools of battle, thus the ability of vanquishing the enemy on the battlefield depends upon the proficiency and speed of individual skills. Therefore, isn't that to be the first priority?
Through diligently practicing these methods and mastering the strategy of the dragon and the tiger, the soldiers protecting the capitol and the talented military officers will not abandon their country.
My true intention of publishing this expanded volume of military tactics is to record this instruction for prosperity.

In the summer of 14th year of the Reign,

King Jungjo



Completed by King Jungjo in 1789; Muyedobotongji is Korea's only surviving manual for military martial arts. Comprised of 24 hand-to-hand fighting, sword, polearms, and horsemanship techniques originating from Korea, China, and Japan; Muyedobotongji gives a clear insight to how soldiers in eighteenth century would have fought.
Its intention was to revive military arts in Chosun (Korean) society, where due to Confucianism, military arts were frowned upon and regarded as an useless skill. But after suffering massive invasions throughout 16th to 17th century, Korea recognized the need for the skill that they once detested in order to be prepared for any future conflict. Therefore, Muyedobotongji was created; it was a product after centuries of conflict.

1) Je Dok Gum (Admiral's Sword)
2) Jang Chang (Spear)
3) Juk Jang Chang (Bamboo Spear)
3) Dang Pa (Trident)
4) Dung Pae (Shield)
5) Nang Sun (Multiple-Bamboo Tipped Spear)
6) Gi Chang (Flag Spear)
7) Ye Do (Short Sword)
8) Bon Guk Gum (Silla Kingdom's Sword?)
9) Ssangsodo (Long Sword)
10) Woldo (Crescent Blade)
11) Wae Gum Do (Japanese Swordmanship)
13) Kwo Jun Bo (Combat Method)
14) Hyeop Do (Spear-Sword)
13) Ssang Gum (Double Sword)
14) Gon Bong (Staff)
15) Pyeon Gon (Flail)
16) Masang Gi Chang (Spear on Horseback)
17) Gi Chang Kyo Jun Bo (Spear Combat Method on Horseback)
18) Masang Woldo (Woldo on Horseback)
19) Masang Pyeon Gon (Flail on Horseback)
20) Masang Ssang Gum (Double Sword on Horseback)
22) Gwon Bub (Unarmed Fighting)
23) Kyuk Goo Bo (Polo)
24) Masang Jae (Horsemanship)



This is my first time blogging one of my favourite subjects; martial arts. The reason I love this book even more is that it has many techniques from Korea, China, and Japan. Therefore, all those three cultures have contributed their respectable martial arts techniques into this military manual. I hope you enjoy this blog.


NOTE. Some people may find this offensive, whether if its from my comments, description of the technique, or (especially) the history of the techniques. I kindly ask that some refrain from sparking some internet trolling or flamming going around in this blog. Thank you.



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