AsiaFinest Forum
Ad: 123Designing.com

Welcome Guest ( Log In | Register )

2 Pages V   1 2 >  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
Malaysia’s brain drain getting worse, says World Bank
SChong54
post Apr 29 2011, 09:11 AM
Post #1


AF Geek
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 129
Joined: 24-September 08




Go ... go ... go from this country because we don't need you ....

Why we worry about brain drain .... According to Perkasa and UMNO, Malay people are so much more supreme than others so they can fill the void lor .... beerchug.gif

QUOTE
Malaysia’s brain drain getting worse, says World Bank
By Lee Wei Lian
April 28, 2011

KUALA LUMPUR, April 28 — World Bank senior economist Philip Schellekens painted a gloomy picture of the Malaysian brain drain situation today saying that it not only grew rapidly but is likely to intensify, further eroding the country’s already narrow skills base.

Schellekens said that the number of skilled Malaysians living abroad has tripled in the last two decades with two out of every 10 Malaysians with tertiary education opting to leave for either OECD (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries or Singapore.

“Brain drain from Malaysia is likely to intensify in the absence of mitigating actions,” he said at the launch of the World Bank report titled “Malaysia Economic Monitor: Brain Drain”.

The report defined brain drain as the outflow of those with tertiary-level education.

The economist said Malaysian migration was increasingly becoming a skills migration with one-third of the one million-strong Malaysian diaspora now consisting of the tertiary educated.

“Expect the trend to continue,” he said.

He added that the outflow of talent was not being replaced with inflows, thus damaging the quality of Malaysia’s “narrow” skills base, noting that 60 per cent of immigration into Malaysia had only primary education or less, even as the number of skilled expatriates declined by 25 per cent since 2004.

The report also noted that there was a geographic and ethnic component to the brain drain, with about 88 per cent of the Malaysian diaspora in Singapore being of ethnic Chinese origin.

“The numbers for US and Australia are similar,” said Schellekens.

Report figures also show that 54 per cent of the Malaysian brain drain went to Singapore while 15 per cent went to Australia, 10 per cent to the US and 5 per cent to the UK.

The top three drivers for brain drain identified by the report were career prospects, compensation and social justice.

“(Lack of) Meritocracy and unequal access to scholarships are significant push factors and a deterrent to coming back,” said Schellekens. “Non-Bumiputeras are over-represented in the brain drain.”

He suggested that Malaysia implement important structural reforms in tandem with introducing targeted measures such as income tax incentives to reverse the brain drain.

“Once the highway is built, you must compete for traffic,” he said. “One suggestion is to hold a competition among members of the diaspora to get ideas on what can be done to attract them home.”

He added that while this report estimated the Malaysian diaspora at one million compared with about 1.4 million in a previous World Bank report, it was due to the lack of Singapore government information on the breakdown of its non-resident population.

“This is a conservative estimate and the diaspora could well be larger,” he said.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
elleX0
post Apr 29 2011, 09:46 AM
Post #2


AF Pro
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 1,802
Joined: 20-September 09
From: At Infinity




Sadly, most Bumiputras will see this diaspora as a confirmation of the disloyalty of those leaving, and won't give a damn. In fact if all of the minority peoples would leave, then the jobs will easily be filled by Bumiputras. Good riddance to these disloyal minorities. What can those people do that Bumiputras cannot do?

If anyone hopes for this situation to change any time in the near future, then they are hoping for a miracle. Accept the situation as fait accompli, because that is the way the Bumiputras prefer it. Now you can see why Islamic nations are what they are. They are insular.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
elleX0
post May 1 2011, 01:56 PM
Post #3


AF Pro
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 1,802
Joined: 20-September 09
From: At Infinity




Hurray, the Malaysian way ! Enjoy!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Henry123
post May 6 2011, 07:34 AM
Post #4


AF Guru
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 4,604
Joined: 23-April 06




Of course minorities will take all their wealth with them when they leave. Not to mention tech. know how to some economic rival nation.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
elleX0
post May 6 2011, 09:56 AM
Post #5


AF Pro
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 1,802
Joined: 20-September 09
From: At Infinity




QUOTE (Henry123 @ May 6 2011, 01:34 PM) *
Of course minorities will take all their wealth with them when they leave. Not to mention tech. know how to some economic rival nation.

Henry123, the Bumiputras believe that it is all for the better for the unity of the nation. Bumis do no want infidels on their patch. The Qur'an tells them that.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Henry123
post May 6 2011, 02:09 PM
Post #6


AF Guru
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 4,604
Joined: 23-April 06




QUOTE (elleX0 @ May 6 2011, 10:56 AM) *
Henry123, the Bumiputras believe that it is all for the better for the unity of the nation. Bumis do no want infidels on their patch. The Qur'an tells them that.

I'm sure they believe that elleX0. I wouldnt be too suprise.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
elleX0
post May 6 2011, 03:15 PM
Post #7


AF Pro
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 1,802
Joined: 20-September 09
From: At Infinity




QUOTE (Henry123 @ May 6 2011, 08:09 PM) *
I'm sure they believe that elleX0. I wouldnt be too suprise.

And the sooner the minority people realise this and accept it the better it will be for all concerned. Then they can decide what they want to do with their lives. There is one alternative that is hardly ever mentioned, for the minorities to accept and adopt the predominant culture and religion as they have in Indonesia, and Thailand.But it will be a difficult choice to make.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Henry123
post May 6 2011, 07:05 PM
Post #8


AF Guru
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 4,604
Joined: 23-April 06




QUOTE (elleX0 @ May 6 2011, 04:15 PM) *
There is one alternative that is hardly ever mentioned, for the minorities to accept and adopt the predominant culture and religion as they have in Indonesia, and Thailand.But it will be a difficult choice to make.

True.
Or seek autonomy and or resistance.

This post has been edited by Henry123: May 7 2011, 12:02 PM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
humiliator
post Jun 4 2011, 11:03 AM
Post #9


AF Geek
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 116
Joined: 10-April 11




Is he dutch or flemish belgian ? Doesn't matter. Both are too dumb to design a world class engine of any kind.
Philip schelleken's humble opinion is as useless as his people.


QUOTE (elleX0 @ Apr 29 2011, 10:46 AM) *
Sadly, most Bumiputras will see this diaspora as a confirmation of the disloyalty of those leaving, and won't give a damn. In fact if all of the minority peoples would leave, then the jobs will easily be filled by Bumiputras. Good riddance to these disloyal minorities. What can those people do that Bumiputras cannot do?

If anyone hopes for this situation to change any time in the near future, then they are hoping for a miracle. Accept the situation as fait accompli, because that is the way the Bumiputras prefer it.
Indeed.

QUOTE (Henry123 @ May 6 2011, 08:34 AM) *
Of course minorities will take all their wealth with them when they leave. Not to mention tech. know how to some economic rival nation.
What important tech know how those primitive downtrodden minorities have ? I really would like to know.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
skinheadselamany...
post Jun 6 2011, 07:22 AM
Post #10


AF Fan
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 93
Joined: 30-May 11




http://politics.sgforums.com/forums/10/topics/307541

The way I see it, all these kiasuland hate mongers are here just to make themselves feel better about their $hitty island...

This post has been edited by skinheadselamanya: Jun 6 2011, 07:25 AM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
chutzpah
post Jun 7 2011, 04:43 AM
Post #11


AF Pro
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 1,103
Joined: 15-December 10




No matter how you look at it, the undisputable and undeniable facts that we are better, in fact not just better, we are far far suprior than you will ever be. You can only dream of ever achieving where we are.

BN and Mahathir have been keeping you stupid for almost 50 years by spoon feeding your lot. What have you ever achieved apart from breeding more stupid terrorists? Even your top athletes or designers are either Chinese or India. As your many brain-dead MPs coin them PATI (pendatang Asing Tampa Izin) After 50 years, the Malays' stupid genes have increased, stupity breeds stupidity and there is no end to it anytime soon.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
swingdoctor
post Jun 8 2011, 08:24 AM
Post #12


AF Guru
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 3,529
Joined: 16-February 06




QUOTE (humiliator @ Jun 8 2011, 08:00 AM) *
Top malaysian athletes are malays.

Top engineers, surgeons, architects, industrialists are also entirely malays.
Majority of the richest malaysians are malay fuel and banking tycoons.
Ethnic chinese in malaysia are backward & destitute. That's why there are chinese living with malay family as housekeeper and also chinese who climb coconut trees of malay villagers.
Malaysian indians are even worse off. Forced to become coolies in the plantations together with their wives and children.

As for singaporeans, they are the underclass in their own primitive country. Born to clean toilet bowls in the homes of expatriates.

Haha what a joke, who is Malaysia's and the world's no1 ranked male singles badminton player, what about doubles? Malaysia has the worlds no 1 womens squash player, who is she? As far as I understand, and correct me if I'm wrong but these are the only 2 sports of international recognition that Malaysians are at the very top. Malaysia has an improving cycling team, still far from the top and unlikely to get there, and the team is not wholly Malay, and it trains in Australia. What I do know is this, sports people representing their country, do not compete for their race, they compete for their flag. Its only people like you that make race an issue, even then you are embarrassingly wrong.

I am a doctor and I have studied in a Malaysian hospital and yes there are some excellent Malay doctors(as there are bad ones) I would hardly say that all the good ones are Malay though, this is just a stupid comment. Obviously for every race there are good doctors, lawyers, engineers etc. To suggest that only Malays make up the good ones is stupid, and if you expect the rest of us to believe such a ludicrous statement you are even stupider still.

The reason why Malays are the wealthiest banking and fuel tycoons is because the Malaysian govnt GAVE them those rights, and gave them to nobody else. There are some very successful Malay people in their own right but citing banking and petroleum is hardly the examples I'd use, these successes were not earned they were given.

Haha what absolute garbage to suggest that "Chinese are backward and destitute". Even despite the favouritism showed to the Malay people and denied to the Chinese, as a race the Chinese are still richer then the Malays. Its interesting though that you brought up the Indians, yes as a race they are the poorest but what you fail to acknowledge is that they are poor and remain poor because of the policies of the largely Malay govnt that put them there and keep them there. A govnt that still refuses to aid the poor Indians but continue to aid the rich Malays get richer. The NEP(that allowed so many Malays to get rich) was argued for by the Malays as a way to spread the economic benefits "equally" among the races, back when they were the poorest, accepted and agreed upon by the Chinese and Indians based on this argument, at the time as a way to promote racial harmony. Now that it is the Indians that are the poorest, this policy is conveniently forgotten, arguing instead that it is their constitutional right when in truth, no such right exists in the constitution. So in my book, generally as a race, the Malays have gotten rich through lies and deceit.

And the toilet bowl cleaners in Singapore are the Indonesian and Filipono maids, besides why do you look down at toilet bowl cleaners. They are being paid an honest days wage for an honest days work. Do you think you are somehow better then someone who cleans toilet bowls? It just shows what an elitist you are. Furthermore, it might surprise you to know that in a recent study, measuring liquid assets only, Singapore has the highest number of millionaires per capita in the world. Something I would hardly call underclass. I think deep down you are jealous. You try very hard to look down on Singapore and Singaporeans yet knowing that in just about every way they are better and more successful then Malaysia. I think you look across the causeway wanting to believe in your racially important mind that Malays and Malaysia are better and more successful then Singapore and her Chinese leaders, when the truth is that Singapore is an example of what Malaysia could have been and perhaps should have been, if only she had been better governed.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
elleX0
post Jun 10 2011, 02:24 PM
Post #13


AF Pro
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 1,802
Joined: 20-September 09
From: At Infinity




QUOTE (SChong54 @ Apr 29 2011, 03:11 PM) *
Go ... go ... go from this country because we don't need you ....

Why we worry about brain drain .... According to Perkasa and UMNO, Malay people are so much more supreme than others so they can fill the void lor .... beerchug.gif

But of course! that is the reason we are having the "Arab Spring."
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
skinheadselamany...
post Jun 11 2011, 11:46 PM
Post #14


AF Fan
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 93
Joined: 30-May 11




QUOTE
http://aaron-ng.info/blog/racism-in-singapore.html

After reading a blog entry by a Malay guy called Ridzwan (I presume that is his name, going by the name of his URL), I must say that racism in Singapore is something that is still very much alive, although in appearance, everything looks nice and well.

I am not sure why some Singaporeans, especially the Chinese Singaporeans, take such a negative view towards fellow Singaporeans of another race. I speak from experience. I graduated from The Chinese High School, a school where you almost have no students from other races. I went on to Hwa Chong Junior College, where the situation is slightly better, but not much. I do notice that many of my friends who have been through 6 years of education in both Chinese dominated schools are somewhat racist.

I must say that the kind of racism I’ve seen is not the extreme kind (by that I mean actual and negative physical action against someone of another race). More often, it’s an extremely strong opinion about a race having certain characteristics and making unsavoury or even derogatory remarks.

Despite 6 years of schooling in institutions where there were few students of other races, I somehow didn’t turn out racist by any measure. I don’t know why, but I just think that it’s not right to make certain conclusions about people based on their race. While it is true that people of a certain race have slightly different habits and customs, it does not make them any less a human being.

It’s just plain unfair to think of certain races as inherently being more lazy, more unpatriotic, more prone to causing social problems etc. It’s always easier to demonise others because that makes self-reflection unnecessary. By casting others as the problem, we escape from having to consider whether we are problematic. Face it, for whatever labels that are cast on non-chinese Singaporeans, I bet to my last dollar that you will find many Chinese Singaporeans that fit the label exactly. Before Chinese Singaporeans think badly of other races in Singapore, they ought to make sure that they have the moral authority to do so.

I had the benefit of being in the minority when I went to the UK for 3 weeks in 2004. When I was there, I truly understand how it feels to be in the minority. You are always conscious of yourself because you look different from most people around you. It gave me an invaluable lesson. I think that most Chinese Singaporeans should go spend some time in a place where they are the minority and see how it feels. Nothing teaches better than actual experience.

Of course, that’s not a feasible option for everyone. I don’t think that having Racial Harmony Day is a feasible option either. What can one day of celebrations do? What is really necessary is for people of different races to come together for an extended period of time. Understanding is not forged in a matter days. It takes years. And, it better start from young. As the saying goes, old habits die hard.

Perhaps the first step in the right direction is to dismantle the SAP school system. The SAP schools focus on teaching excellence in Chinese, and students are usually Chinese. How can we reduce racism if we have such schools? I came from one such school, and I see for myself that such schools, more often than not, produce students that harbour some form of racism. And, it doesn’t help that most of these schools are academically strong institutions that attract smart students. This means that their graduates are likely to be future leaders of society, and I am not comfortable with these future leaders harbouring some form of racist ideas.

I think I’ve stirred a hornet’s nest by suggesting the dismantling of the system that I went through. I have to admit that there are exceptions, and not every graduate from an SAP school is racist. However, the odds of producing a somewhat racist person is higher in an SAP school. By the same token, I think that muslim schools (called madrasahs if I am not mistaken) should also be looked at. These schools should be confined to strictly teaching religion, and learning other subjects should be done in government schools. If we want to tackle the problem of racism and maintain racial harmony, we really need to take the necessary steps, even if they might not please certain groups of people.



Note: The link to Ridzwan's blog shows his blog has been disabled. Really no freedom of expression in the Imperial Dynasty of PAP.

http://tomorrow.sg/archives/2008/11/21/are...pore_racis.html


QUOTE
http://willblogforfood.typepad.com/will_bl...-singapore.html

An Nguyen Discusses Racism in Singapore

There are 3 major ethnic groups in this country. Chinese (70%), Malay (20%), Indian and others (10%). While the Malays and Indians are easy going groups, who seldom make any complaints about foreigners, the Chinese are the most vocal on this issue.

The Chinese-Singaporeans complain that their jobs and their livelihood are at stake because of foreigners (mainland Chinese, Vietnamese, Indians, Westerners, etc...). They urge that the government should have strict control over working visas and immigration to protect the locals.

Their main targets are the Chinese from mainland China. The Chinese-Singaporeans often regard these people as Mainland-Chinese in order to distinguish themselves as more refined Chinese. They say that these people are unrefined, lazy, and have a lot of bad habits that they carried with them from the old country.

The truth is that most of these people are very decent and hard working. They often take on low wage and unwanted jobs that are rejected by the locals (chef, waiter/waitress, cleaning, odd jobs, etc.). They can be found in almost any profession that one cound think of.

Racism can also be found in schools here. Most Singaporean students don't want to be friends with foreign students. A friend of mine, who has been here for 10 years on a government scholarship, told me that no one in her school wants to be associated with her or other foreign students. They especially look down on students that come from third world countries like India, Burma, Thailand, Vietnam, Philippines, etc. Last year she won a scholarship to do exchange study at Carnegie University (Pittburg, PA) for 6 months. She told us that she made more friends in the US during those 6 months than the 10 years that she spent in Singapore.

Other foreign students told us that their Singaporean teachers would not hesitate to make racist remarks toward them (e.g. "Philippino workers are very loyal like dogs.")

Everyday, I see the local employers transporting their foreign workers to different work locations in appalling conditions. Their lorries don't have any cover and these poor workers have to put up with 30 - 35C heat and rain. Very often, the employers scold them like they are some kind of animal.

What does the Singaporean government do? Well, nothing. If you are being ill treated by your employers and stage a protest, that would be the end of your working days in this country.

Have you ever heard of 100% - 150% rent increase before? Well, it happens here in Singapore. Most apartments and houses are owned by Singaporeans and they are the best profiteers on earth. The rent contract is usually from 1 - 2 years max. When it expires, the landlords can raise the rent as much as they want. Practically all foreigners are tenants, and there is no such thing as a Tenant Advocate to help protect them. As a result, a lot of them have to squeeze themselves into tiny apartments to save money. A lot of foreign students have to leave because they can't afford the high rent.

In my opinion, Singapore is a good country with many good things like clean government, safe, clean, excellent infra-structure, good health care, low taxes, excellent educational system, etc. The government is doing a lot of good things to look after the welfare of their citizens. However, racism, discrimination and the ungracious manners of the locals have begun to their toll on the image of this country. Most foreigners view the Chinese-Singaporeans as ungracious blood suckers, opportunists, and racists. This will definitely have a negative effect on Singapore in the future.

You can read more about the Singaporeans on Asiaone News.



QUOTE
http://www.thingsasian.com/stories-photos/2196

A Kiasu Experience
About the Author

As a Malaysian, I have always wondered why is it that my neighboring country, Singapore, has been labeled as the home of the "kiasu" people. Kiasu, it seems, is such a proud claim that there are t-shirts and apparel with the word kiasu at it. There is even a sitcom by the name of Mr. Kiasu.

For the uninformed, the word kiasu is an expression in which Singaporeans use to describe themselves. It basically points to those who want to get the most for whatever they pay for. In short, getting the best deals in the cheapest possible way, preferably free! Not exactly a positive word to label anyone with, yet my recent trip to Singapore only proves that there may be some truth in the saying. It is not that I am biased or have any negative impression of my neighbors, but this is something that happened to me personally and therefore, I dare to recount the incidents despite the risk of being deported the moment I step in to Singapore again for my next trip. OK, just kidding!

Singapore had always made me homesick for Malaysia. If anyone thinks that Kuala Lumpur is hectic, wait till you check out Singapore. The whole country never seems to sleep. There are hordes of people on the streets at any time of the day, worst than ever on weekends. It is hard to walk without rubbing shoulders with a few hundred people a day. Everything in Singapore is about queuing up. You queue when you want to order food, or get a table at the restaurant. You queue to make your payments, get a cab, take a pee, or catch a glimpse of a famous starlet's street performance! It amazes me just how much queuing is involved in that country. Yes, it may be a good thing to learn how to queue. Malaysians are not good at queuing at all. Then again, this is probably because we hardly ever have a need to. Could it be the culture, environment, and lifestyle that made the Singaporeans kiasu? It is their constant mad rush to get above each other that turns them into kiasu people?

I believe it could be the mentality of the people to always want the best (and better) than anyone else (despite their tiny-sized country) that made them behave the way they are today. Perhaps, we cannot entirely blame the people for being kiasu. Sometimes, I feel they do not even know that they are acting so. However, coming from an outsider looking in, the kiasu syndrome is quite apparent. Having been to Singapore several times the past 2 years, I left the country feeling drained and contented to be going home. In fact, I let out a whoop of cheer as I cross the Causeway!

On the first day of my visit, my friends and I were at Suntec City Plaza for the Motor Show 2002. Parking was scarce despite the numerous floors of parking bays. To get a legit parking spot in Singapore is as good as finding a miracle. After 15 minutes of circling around the massive building, we chance upon a couple heading towards the car, opening the door, and getting into their vehicle. Boy, you can imagine how ecstatic we were at having found a decent car park within 15 minutes. After having waited for several minutes, we got impatient. Not only were we getting impatient, but the row of cars behind us (we were hogging the one-lane road) were starting to honk at us. My husband got down from the car and politely knocked on their window, saying "Excuse me, but are you leaving soon?" The guy replied yes, he was. We waited more, reversing a number of times so that cars could squeeze past us. While we waited, we watched as the guy spoke on his mobile phone and made several calls. Later, after 5 minutes, he told us that he is not leaving after all, as he has forgotten to pick up some items from the store. By then, you can only imagine our frustrations. We, being a real pain, refused to budge. We sat in our car, waiting for him to make his move - which is either driving off or going back to the stores. He did neither. He said there for as long as we did, refusing to move. It was quite a comical game we played, now that I am home and can laugh at the incident. After a couple more minutes, we gave up and drove away. The moment we drove past his car, he left the car park spot, making us even angrier than before. Was this a blatant show of kiasuism, we wonder? Was that his way of getting back at us for having bugged him about leaving, or was it just a common form of Singaporeans who do not like to give others their parking spot, even though they were leaving? Anyhow, I am sure it would have infuriated him if he had known that we got his parking spot after all.

After we have parked the car, we moved on to the Motor Show 2002. There, while going up the escalator, we saw a little boy struggling with a huge Mazda paper bag, which we gathered was obtained from the Motor Show. The paper bag was large enough to envelope the boy had we stuffed him in it. That pretty much made us wonder... is this again a form of kiasuism? That their paper bags must be bigger than anyone else? Some families (of four) had a paper bag each. When the employees at Mazda came out with a bundle of these bags, it was snatched up faster than you can say, "Wow, what a big bag!"

The Motor Show was interesting enough. Two floors of pure power and gleaming machines! We had to pay S$8 per adult, which was decently priced. Ah, but alas, we weren't quick enough, therefore no Mazda paper bags for us! Perhaps we should learn to queue up the next time...

That night itself, my friends and I went for dinner at Tiong Bahru. It was a delicious meal of fish head bee hoon, Singapore fried kuey teow, fried chicken, vegetables, and tofu. It was a simple meal no doubt, but the noodles gave us a fright! Bee hoon in Malaysia is a slim as vermicelli. However, the ones in Singapore are 4 times the size. The kuey teow in Malaysia is half the size of that found in Singapore. Again we joked amongst ourselves that "Gee... even their noodles has got to be bigger and better than anyone else!" What a motivation for achievement!

The next day, at lunch, we were at the Yee Cheong Yuen Noodle Restaurant. This restaurant prides itself for serving delicious noodles since 1970. Some of their specialties include the Oyster Sauce Chicken Hor Fun (a type of noodle), fried won ton, and other forms of noodles. The restaurant (as with all restaurants in Singapore) is crowded and the queue was building up. The table we booked was an 8-seater one. However, our lunch party was made up of either 5 or 6 people. A friend's presence was unconfirmed. Very soon, the place was filled up and the three of us (my husband, a friend and I) were the only ones seated there, waiting for the rest to arrive. An elderly woman with her husband and a friend came up to us, asking the number of people that will be occupying our table. My friend replied, saying we have either 5 or 6 only. The woman promptly insisted that she would like to share our table, since 5 plus 3 people on her side made 8. Having plunked her husband there to "guard" their space, she proceeded with her friend to the queue to order their meal. While she was gone, the remaining people from my group of friend arrived, a guy and his girl friend. With a total of 6 people in my lunch group now, we realized that we have no space for the woman. When she came back with her lunch, to our great surprise, she made a huge fuss out of it. She pointed fingers at us, saying we told her we had only 5 people in our group (duh, we did tell her we might be expecting 6). Since we have an extra person in our group, she insisted that my extra friend cannot sit there. We were outrageous, of course. I mean, we were there first (oops, first sign of the kiasu syndrome invading us), we booked the table for ourselves, she wanted to join in, but if we did run out of space suddenly, who should move?

With much reluctance, she finally gave up her hold on the seat. We thought she was about to flip my friend out of her chair. Mumbling some sarcastic remarks at us, cursing us Chinese in general for not being able to speak Mandarin (whatever for), and a horde of other insults were hurled at us. Not wanting to get into an argument with an old lady, we quietly went on with our meals. When we left the restaurant a moment later, boy oh boy, if looks could kill, I will be dead by now. I thought she was shooting daggers at us with her looks!

Isolated though the cases may be, yet it was these little small incidents that marred our weekend there. Of course, I believe that there are many polite and decent Singaporeans in that country. However, the kiasu syndrome is something that cannot be denied. It is there... in that country and living amongst them. To me, Singapore is all about money. You cannot leave your house without spending money. If you are at KFC, watch your queue. Once, at KFC, the first and third lane was opened to customers to make their orders. Suddenly, a staff decides to open the middle lane to take more orders. Immediately, people from the first and third queue jumped in to the middle lane, and a fight ensues. The question is... who came first? Some would say that they were there at the first lane wayyyyyy before the guy from the third lane came in. The third guy said, too bad, I saw the middle lane opened first, so I get in line before you. Then someone would say, "No way, I was here 2 minutes before you!" At the end of the day, who is right and who is not?

Perhaps I have been too harsh in my judgment, or maybe I have not. Do not get me wrong. I am not saying that every Singaporean is kiasu. There are plenty of kiasu Malaysians as well. But somehow, this phenomenon seemed more apparent in Singapore. I wonder why...


QUOTE


QUOTE


QUOTE


QUOTE




And lastly, a girl's view that Singaporean men sucks @$$!!! Hahahaha!!!

QUOTE



Kiasuland gets off being holier than thou all the time to everyone/everything they come into contact with. The world hates kiasuland and they don't even know it. Hahahahaha!!!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
humiliator
post Jul 25 2011, 11:11 AM
Post #15


AF Geek
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 116
Joined: 10-April 11




QUOTE (swingdoctor @ Jun 8 2011, 08:24 AM) *
Haha what a joke, who is Malaysia's and the world's no1 ranked male singles badminton player
World's No1 ranked is Lin Dan of China. icon_wink.gif

QUOTE
Malaysia has the worlds no 1 womens squash player, who is she?
I couldn't care less who that masculine female freak is.

QUOTE
Haha what absolute garbage to suggest that "Chinese are backward and destitute". Even despite the favouritism showed to the Malay people and denied to the Chinese, as a race the Chinese are still richer then the Malays.
Is that why they become maids for malay families ?



QUOTE
And the toilet bowl cleaners in Singapore are the Indonesian and Filipono maids,
Tell that to the singaporean employees at Amahs-On-Wheels
http://www.amahsonwheels.com/index.php?act...es&do=story

Singaporeans are damn hopeless scumbags. Thats why I spit on them


This post has been edited by humiliator: Jul 25 2011, 11:22 AM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
swingdoctor
post Jul 25 2011, 06:06 PM
Post #16


AF Guru
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 3,529
Joined: 16-February 06




QUOTE (humiliator @ Jul 25 2011, 12:11 PM) *
World's No1 ranked is Lin Dan of China. icon_wink.gif

Not according to BWF http://www.bwfbadminton.org/page.aspx?id=14955
QUOTE (humiliator @ Jul 25 2011, 12:11 PM) *
I couldn't care less who that masculine female freak is.

I personally think she's quite attractive, but what has this got to do with her sporting powress. Besides it was you who made the claim that Malays were Malaysia's leading sportspeople, yet you haven't named one.

QUOTE (humiliator @ Jul 25 2011, 12:11 PM) *
Is that why they become maids for malay families ?



Tell that to the singaporean employees at Amahs-On-Wheels
http://www.amahsonwheels.com/index.php?act...es&do=story

Singaporeans are damn hopeless scumbags. Thats why I spit on them

What do these phostos show, it just looks like happy snaps from families. How can you tell who's who or what is what.

What does the website prove? That a cleaning service is provided. Do they have a list of employees and where they are from?

This "evidence" you have provided is just stupid.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
chutzpah
post Jul 25 2011, 10:38 PM
Post #17


AF Pro
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 1,103
Joined: 15-December 10




humility and skinhead... aiyo malu lah... how come you people are so so so sooooo stupid and digging your own holes all the time? embarassedlaugh.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
skinheadselamany...
post Aug 3 2011, 08:03 PM
Post #18


AF Fan
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 93
Joined: 30-May 11




QUOTE (analmasturbator @ Jul 26 2011, 11:38 AM) *
humility and skinhead... aiyo malu lah... how come you people are so so so sooooo stupid and digging your own holes all the time? embarassedlaugh.gif


?????

Amende lu cakap ni? Sawan ke? Tak paham aku... kalau dah kiasu tu...

Oh well, haters will hate...

This post has been edited by skinheadselamanya: Aug 3 2011, 08:25 PM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
chutzpah
post Aug 4 2011, 01:27 AM
Post #19


AF Pro
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 1,103
Joined: 15-December 10




QUOTE (skinheadselamanya @ Aug 3 2011, 09:03 PM) *
?????

Amende lu cakap ni? Sawan ke? Tak paham aku... kalau dah kiasu tu...

Oh well, haters will hate...

Can you translate, I don't understand porcin-speak, oink oink!! embarassedlaugh.gif
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
skinheadselamany...
post Aug 4 2011, 07:17 PM
Post #20


AF Fan
Group Icon

Group: Members
Posts: 93
Joined: 30-May 11




QUOTE (chutzpah @ Aug 4 2011, 02:27 PM) *
Can you translate, I don't understand porcin-speak, oink oink!! embarassedlaugh.gif


QUOTE
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/porcin
porcin - no dictionary results



Whats porcin? I don't understand kiasu language...

Anyway, I assumed you understood. Your national anthem is in the language. Didn't know you're too... whats that only word that you know... bodoh... to understand your own national anthem.



This post has been edited by skinheadselamanya: Aug 4 2011, 08:10 PM
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

2 Pages V   1 2 >
Reply to this topicStart new topic

 



Lo-Fi Version Time is now: 22nd December 2014 - 10:19 AM