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Korean crimes in Vietnam War
tofu101
post Sep 19 2007, 08:08 PM
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Yes, I have created a new topic related to SK involvement in VN again.

However, this time I want to take a more serious approach. In this thread I will provide sources in which depicts the crimes commited by SK troops during Vietnam war. Some Koreans believe there were little to no crimes, but as you read these articles you will think otherwise. There are few Koreans who find pride in the actions of these Korean troops, but what is there really to be proud of? Did the South Korean troops really went into Vietnam for "humane" reasons, in what some say to "stop the spread of communism?" Or, was their intention totally different? In actuality, US convinced SK to enter Vietnam in exchange for economic and military aid, in which SK could not refuse. As a result, SK troops barged into Vietnam killing over 40,000 Vietnamese lives, including up to 4000 Vietnamese civilians. As for South Korea, their casualty lost amounted up to 4,900 soldiers, with over 11,000 wounded. It is not certain whether all VC death victims were in fact VCs or civilians. So, some believe the Korean killing ratio was 1:15 or 1:25, but nothing is for sure. Nevertheless, both US and SK troops finally surrendered in 75, leaving Vietnam war-torn as VC claimed victory.

QUOTE
"In 1964, when the Park Chung Hee military regime sent troops to Vietnam it aimed mainly to upgrade the ROK (Republic of Korea)-U.S. Mutual Defense Agreement of 1954 to a treaty on par with NATO, designed to secure a U.S. military presence in South Korea." http://www.zmag.org/content/showarticle.cfm?ItemID=3482


QUOTE
"Pacific News Service, Sep 18, 2003

Editor's Note: Once Korea's forgotten war, the Vietnam War is looming large in the South Korean consciousness.

SEOUL, South Korea--Between 1965 and 1970, more than 310,000 Korean soldiers fought in the Vietnam War, the largest foreign contingent after American troops. At the height of the war in 1969, 50,000 Korean combat soldiers were stationed in Vietnam, outnumbering even North Vietnamese troops. More than 5,000 South Korean lives were lost.

Yet for decades, Vietnam remained Korea's forgotten war. Now, however, the country's collective memory of its involvement in Vietnam is slowly, painfully surfacing.

Kim Young Man fought alongside U.S. troops in Vietnam. While American forces provided artillery backup, Korean soldiers like Kim were stationed on the front lines. His job was to keep allied forces alive by killing as many of the enemy as possible.

Today, interviewed by telephone, Kim struggles to talk about killing Vietnamese during the battle.

"War is not a game," he says. "We fought. We killed people, what else should I say?" Kim speaks softly, gets choked up, breaks off the conversation several times and then calls back.

Living with decades of guilt, Kim says it took him a long time to admit Korean soldiers had massacred thousands of Vietnamese, including civilians.

"We had the pride of joining the war for a long time," says Kim. "That's why most veterans exaggerate or boast the Vietnam War experience rather than reflect that war is fundamentally wrong and we did something wrong there."

Kim now works for a group that promotes unification of North and South Korea. A few years ago, he penned a letter of apology to the Vietnamese people for war crimes committed by Korean soldiers during the Vietnam War, and sent it to Korea's largest progressive daily, Hankyoreh, which published it.

Kim never asked other soldiers to write the paper, but confession letters from other Korean Vietnam War veterans soon poured in. Hankyoreh published more and more letters from veterans, and with the help of peace activists the series blossomed into a larger campaign called, "Thanh that xin loi, Vietnam" (We are deeply sorry, Vietnam).

The reconciliation campaign proved unpopular among many Korean veterans. Shortly after it started, thousands of veterans stormed the offices of the newspaper. Many believe they risked their lives in Vietnam defending democracy, and consider the letter-writers apologists.

Chong Kyung Jin was a company commander in the Marine Corps in Vietnam. He was awarded a Silver Star by the U.S. military for killing more than 30 North Vietnamese soldiers in a single day.

"Communism was expanding in Asia," he says. "If U.S. soldiers didn't attack, Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia and the Philippines would be communist countries today. We prevented that from happening."

Until 1988, Korea was ruled by a succession of military dictatorships that buried the memory of Korean involvement in Vietnam. The Korean government also preferred not to admit it had received economic payoffs for assisting the United States in Vietnam.

The United States saved about $8,000 per solider per year by paying Korean soldiers to fight instead of American ones -- a savings of $2.5 billion dollars over eight years -- and it promised $1 billion dollars to the South Korean government. Han Hong Koo teaches modern Korean history at Sungkonghoe University. He says the money gave South Korea a big economic boost at a time when the country needed to rebuild. South Korean companies were awarded reconstruction contracts to build roads and bridges in Vietnam. Korea was also able to boost exports of electronics. Both factors helped lay the groundwork for the country's current economy.

The turning point in Korean consciousness about Vietnam, Han says, occurred in September 1999, and involved a different war. The Associated Press published an investigative story about the No Gun Ri massacre, in which American soldiers fired machine guns at Korean refugees taking shelter under a bridge during the Korean War. More than 100 civilians were reportedly killed.

"What happened in No Gun Ri and what happened in Vietnam were the same thing," Han says. "It was the massacre of civilians by soldiers. In act one we were the victims, and in act two we were the victimizers.

"We Koreans had an image of ourselves as peace-loving people, but for the first time that image was shattered."

Han says for a long time Korean history books neglected to tell the story of Korean mercenaries during the Vietnam War, in the same way the Japanese distorted the history of its half-century colonial rule over Korea.

"We were seriously angry about that, but we did the same thing. Of course, what we did in Vietnam was smaller in scale and shorter in time span than what the Japanese did to us, but even if we do not intend to provide sincere apology to the Vietnamese people, how can we ask the Japanese government to apologize to us?"



QUOTE
In Vietnam, the doctrine of atrocity was built not only on official U.S. policies but also on such macabre principles as the "mere g@@k rule," which cast all Vietnamese as subhuman, and its attendant dictum: "If it's dead and Vietnamese, it's VC." These standard operating procedures led to many acts of mistreatment and killing of noncombatants by U.S. troops that, while illegal under the laws of war, were tacitly encouraged, unofficially condoned, and rarely punished in a severe manner.




QUOTE
“War is the worst of all crime that man can do. A
A Professional NGO’s Journey into Vietnam
Chung Chang-kwon * 2000-10-31



This is a record of a remarkable action for reconciliation and forgiveness by an NGO of dental professionals in Korea. Based in Seoul, the Dentists Association for a Healthy Society (DAHS) has been campaigning to contribute to healing of Vietnamese victims of atrocities during the Vietnamese War. An interview with the author follows this article. - Editor

The Dentists Association for a Healthy Society(DAHS) set out to have an health care itinerary on 11 March 2000. The nine-day mission was prompted by the organization’s attention to the news originally attributed to the vernacular weekly Hankyoreh 21. The weekly startled the public in the previous year with a scoop article written by a correspondent based in Ho Chi Min city, Vietnam.

Koo Soo-jung, a graduate student in a Vietnamese university and a stringer for the weekly, reported in the now legendary article that she had uncovered verifiable proof of Korean soldiers’ human rights atrocities on Vietnamese civilian population during the Vietnamese War. She had digged government documents, searched official archives, met the victim’s relatives and survivors, and recorded their testimony.

The Korean government of the President Park Chung-hee sent a considerable size of combat troops to the Southeast Asian country under a military pact with the U.S. which fought in there since the 1960s. Many now point out that the decision to send in troops was derived from the huge financial compensation the U.S. government promised to the Korean regime. The despatch of Korean combat troops was seen by many as unjustifiable intervention with domestic affair of a Third World country.

The story both raised an unprecedented interest among the general public and provoked angry outcry by the war veterans and conservative factions of the public on an equal measure. The weekly was inundated with offers of help and sympathy, but at the same time drew fierce criticism of the military ranks and veterans for ‘disseminating unfounded allegation’.

Nevertheless, the original story began taking a form of series of investigative journalism due partly to public demand for fuller truth. Domestic and foreign press started taking note of the series and the story became a matter of great importance among human rights activists’ circle in the country.

Ferocious public debate was ensued with lively discussions about how to help Vietnamese overcome this tragic trauma of war atrocities. People were simply baffled on how the existence of such crime against humanity was shielded out of public attention for so long. The frustration was deteriorated once the full scale of the massacre began to be exposed.

Upon huge response from the public the Hankyoreh press collaborated with some press in Vietnam and activists in Korea to lead a public campaign for the truth and reconciliation. There was also some diplomatic exchange between the two countries - they had re-established diplomatic ties some time earlier - over the publicity of the article.

The DAHS, a group of concerned dentists who are keen on such issue as democratization, equal rights for those in need of health care, and social justice, followed the story closely since its publication. The leadership of the DAHS reached some consensus with its membership that the group could contribute to the process of reconciliation as a pro-democracy NGO in the health care area.

As a result of this decision, the DAHS sent a preparatory team to Vietnam to find out what was needed and how. I was included in the advance team and, after a visit, made a full report to the group. Among the proposals included in the report was a suggestion that the DAHS should send a team of dental experts to provide Vietnamese victims’ relatives and citizens with itinerary free dental service. The objective of the despatch was to reach out those victims in Vietnam on behalf of Korean people as a symbol of apology, and offer our help and resource to those most in need of health care as a gesture of reconciliation.

Upon arrival in Vietnam we started offering dental service to village residents in Suntin County, near Danang from 13 March. Facilities for the group work were in basic standards and there was not enough support service for the activity. We thought of the victims silently before we started the day’s service. The entire team was divided along the lines of some specialist’s service such as conservation, gum disease, oral surgery, children’s dentistry and aseptics.

There was present a team of film crew from the Liberation Film company which made a documentary out of our work in there. Dr Shin Dong-keun, head of our group, was interviewed by the filming team. We were helped by some local assistants and university students for interpretation.

From the next day the whole team was divided into three groups. One group visited sites of atrocities each day in turn while the other two groups took care of the patients in the health center. The first place we visited was Dien Nien where 112 village people including children and women were massacred by Korea troops on 9 October 1966. We met a group of people some of whom were relatives of the victims. We listened to their explanation about what had happened there. The story was truly heartbreaking with harrowing sense of reality.

Another team visited Puk Bin in which 68 villagers were mercilessly killed by Korean troops on 9 October 1966. In particular, there were many survivors of the atrocity from whom we were able to hear vivid account of the massacre. The same happened when we visited Hat Thai village which saw more than twenty villagers killed by Korean soldiers in 1967, with similar incidents occurring several times.

In each site of massacre we visited we burned incense as a sign of mourning. At the same time we did our best to reach out to people and share our feeling with them. At first it was not easy to break the ice between us, but as time went by they opened their mind and engaged with us in free exchange of stories.

Among them was a survivor called Pham Thi Meo. An 85-year old man, Mr Pham Thi Meo recalled the horrific incident which took place when he was 52 years old. He witnessed innocent villagers slaughtered for no reason other than being suspicious. Though visibly shaken by his own memory, he shook hands with us or embraced us at the end. We were deeply moved by this kind of human understanding and forgiveness many times during our stay in the region.

When a team of us visited My Lai we unexpectedly met a group of Americans who paid tribute to a monument for the victims there. It turned out that they were holding the 32nd annual commemoration ceremony for the massacre which became a focal point of the anti-war sentiment at the time. We joined the ceremony which was memorable. Later a news service agency sent a news release around the world carrying our presence there.

One of the most important events was a solemn ritual performed in the ground of the health center by a Korean traditional exorcist-dancer. After hard negotiation with the authority Kim Kyong-ran performed a full ritual of a service for the repose of the departed soul. The ritual consisted of burning incense, dance for reposing of the soul, narration of console for the dead, and laying of wreath. The whole process, the first such ritual performed on Vietnamese soil by a Korean since the end of the war, was recorded by the film crew and the Reuter service.

The itinerary ended on 19 March with record number of patients and cases. With about 40 members of the mission including a press reporter, we treated a total of 1,437 people with 1,981 dental cases. The governor of the province praised us for our devotion, which we returned with gratitude for help and assistance. Some of the Vietnamese press covered our activities there, of which tone was generally appreciative of our endeavor.

The mission has received huge publicity both from home and abroad ever since. Newsweek, the American weekly, was one of them. They said:

“Just last month the Seoul-based Dentists Association for a Healthy Society dispatched 38 of its members to provide free dental work in Vietnam’s massacre villages. Most participants, who treated 1,500 people in four days, were young professionals. ‘Our generation benefited from the Vietnam War, so we had a moral and ethical obligation to treat these people,’ says organizer Chung Chang-kwon. Past atrocities cannot be undone. But for many in Vietnam and now in South Korea they won’t be forgotten.”

With this experience of tremendous solidarity and reconciliation, our organization is considering ways in which the momentum created by our action can proceed with possible contribution from other organization. When we regurgitate the lessons we have earned through this campaign we feel as if we were winding the clock back so that we could correct the past which should never have happened in the first place. But another lesson for us is the importance of human understanding which has miracle power for both the victim and the perpetrator. People can grow up with maturity hard earned by history. Perhaps this is the most important lesson of all this.


* The Dentists Association for a Healthy Society (DAHS)





QUOTE
SOUTH KOREAN TROOPS IN THE VIETNAM WAR



For the last three decades, Western media reports on the Vietnam War mostly covered only a part of the armed conflict in which the American soldiers were participating, as if the American military were the only force that fought the Vietnam Communist army. The Republic of Vietnam Army (ARVN) was often ignored although its strength doubled the Americans in Vietnam and suffered losses twice more than that of the American forces.

Not only activities of the RVN soldiers were not appropriately reported but that of the other allied troops fighting beside the Americans were also ignored. The allies included Thailand with an infantry division including the King Cobra Regiment and its attached units, totaling about 11,000 soldiers; Australia with 9 infantry battalions and an attached artillery battalion from New Zealand; and the 47,000 soldiers of the Republic of Korea (RoK). The Philippines contributed a Civic Action Group of about 2,000 soldiers.

Early this week, there was a report about the alleged massacre committed by the Korean infantry unit in a village of Binh Dinh province in Central Vietnam coastal area. The report was made by Ms Ku Su-jeong who is working for the Hankyere newspaper in Seoul. She heard the story when she was visiting a village in Binh Dinh where the Vietnam Communist Party government had erected a monument in memory of 1,004 victims allegedly massacred by the South Korean troops during the 6-week operation in February 1966 in Binh Khe district, the place now called Tay Son district. The local authorities told her that the victims included 380 villagers who were killed in one day.

Her article was published in May 1999 but it has not been responded as she had expected from Republic of Korea veterans. Her article in Korean language could be found at the web site <www.hani.co.kr>.

This week, three officials of the local government told Reuters in a telephone interview that on February 26, 1966, the Koreans conducted a search-and-destroy operation in the area where 380 peasants in a village were killed at a place called Go Dai. The officials admitted that there had been a number of Communist guerrillas among the dead. Reuters as well as other foreign news agencies weren't permitted to visit the area for more information.

When Reuters asked Hanoi Foreign Minister Nguyen Manh Cam for a comment, Cam said he didn't want to evoke the painful event and by the spirit of humanity and peace, his regime would put behind such stories of the past. When a Reuters correspondent asked if he could take a look at official reports of the massacre, that Hanoi said had been recorded, officials of Hanoi Foreign Ministry denied him a permission, saying that those who were in charge of the archives were too busy to do such favor.

The stories of South Korean troops' atrocities in the Vietnam War is nothing new to the Vietnamese. It could be certain to say that the headquarters of USMACV and RVN Joint General Staff had full accounts of the incidents.

The first RoK infantry units arrived in Binh Dinh on February 26, 1965. Later on, RoK army strength reached the highest number of more than 47,000 troops, in two divisions, a separate brigade, and their supporting units. They were the Capital or "Tigers" Division, the 9th or "White Horse" Division, and the 2nd or Blue Dragon Marine Brigade.

Each was given a Tactical Area of Responsibility where it was responsible for fighting the enemy by their own initiatives and decisions. The Tigers was deployed in Binh Dinh and part of Quang Ngai provinces, the White Horse in Phu Yen and Khanh Hoa, and the Blue Dragon in Quang Nam province.

RoK troops were champions in close combat, renowned in the Vietnam War for their bold ambushes. The Koreans were considered one of the two best combat forces in the Vietnam War. The other was the Australians. Korean commanders were tough and authoritarian under the eyes of the Vietnamese who still remembered how rigid the discipline of the Japanese army had been in 1941-45. A major might beat, slap a captain, a captain might do the same to a lieutenant, and so on...

In their areas of responsibility, curfews were strictly enforced. A person -Vietnamese or Korean - going out at night without a lamp was to commit suicide.

Once a Popular Force (PF, village militia) squad moved about 50 yards into the Korean side of the railway tracks assigned as a boundary between the two areas of responsibility. The Korean troops opened fire without challenging and killed all the Vietnamese squad, whom they mistook as communist guerrillas, in order to have total surprise.

There had been incidents in which innocent peasants were slain by Korean troops. Documents of those cases kept in the former ARVN Headquarters archives might have been destroyed by the communists after Saigon fell, but could still exist somewhere in the US Army archives.

The following well-known cases are related from memory of many Vietnamese.

Once an RoK battalion on the way of operation captured half dozen communist soldiers. They asked the local PF squad in a village to detain the enemy prisoners so that they could go on without bringing them along, and they would pick them up on the way back. The PF men all agreed and promised to do the best.

A few days later when the Koreans returned to pick up the VC prisoners, the village PF squad said that all the prisoners had escaped. After a short investigation indicating that the militia had either neglected their duty or deliberately let the VC prisoners free, the Koreans executed all the PF squad on the spot.

The massacre reported in the Hankyere might be the same incident that many Vietnamese heard in 1966. The rumor ran that in an operation, the Korean troops encountered strong fire from the communist unit in a village. The Korean unit encircled the village, sealed off all possible escape routes. They used megaphones to warn civilians to get out of their village in a given time or get killed when the Koreans came in.

After the deadline, the Koreans launched a fierce attack and seized the objective in a short time. In their search throughout the village, the Koreans shot to kill every single moving creature they met. According to the rumor, more than 300 peasants - old and young women and men, children - were massacred, plus several scores of enemy troops that mingled with the villagers.

News of the massacre quickly spread far and wide, and from then on, communist units dared not use villagers as their human shields against the Korean force. Some Koreans said that both sides in Korea had been doing the same during the Korean War.

The savage tactic proved effective, as security was maintained considerably in the Korean Force's TAORs. Even thieves were scared off from the area. But no Vietnamese anti-Communist ever thinks of such inhuman tactic.

But despite the fact that a great number of Vietnamese were aware of the massacres, both RVN and American military authorities remained silent, apparently to avoid harmful publicity. Western reporters, who could have spared no time to snatch at such hot news, very seldom accompanied the Vietnamese, let alone the Korean combat units. Compared with the Vietnamese, fewer Korean soldiers who spoke fluent English.

South Vietnamese media of course, had to stay within certain limit in reporting military and war news, particularly an event so sensitive like the Korean massacres. Saigon newspapers only published some reports relating to the Korean force in Vietnam, for example the two rapists who were given death sentences by the RoK court-martial.

In one case in ca.1968, a 20-years-old Vietnamese girl in Ninh Hoa was raped and killed by a Korean soldier. Within an hour or so, the Korean command in the area found the rapist with undeniable proof and he pleaded guilty. A Korean court -martial with military judges sent from Seoul handed him death sentence. Although the victim's parents petitioned the court for commutation, he was shot by a firing squad near the place he had raped the girl after the South Korean president refused to commute the death sentence.


QUOTE
-South Korea's dark Vietnam war legacy lingers

HANOI - In central Vietnam's Binh Dinh province stands a large gravestone with 1,004 names etched in the granite -- victims, local officials say, of a killing spree by South Korean troops during the Vietnam War. The locals say 1,000 people, mainly civilians, died in the six-week rampage in early 1966 -- including 380 in one day.

Now a Korean journalist who has spent several months documenting harrowing accounts of survivors from the alleged killings in Binh Dinh says it's time Seoul apologised for the brutality of its troops and paid compensation to victims. Ku Su-Jeong, who works part-time for South Korea's Hankyoreh21 magazine, plans to give a speech on her findings next month at a human rights conference on Korea's Cheju island, just before the 25th anniversary of the end of the war in April. Ku stumbled upon the gravestone while doing research on Seoul's involvement in the war, and began interviewing victims whose stories invoked memories of an infamous massacre of Vietnamese by U.S. troops at My Lai village two years later. Ku hopes her paper will draw attention to the issue, although an article she wrote for her magazine last May drew only a muted response from Korean veterans who insisted it was unclear if civilians were killed in Binh Dinh.

``South Koreans must know about these massacres. They cast shame on us and we have a duty to apologise,'' Ku said. During the Vietnam War, Seoul wholeheartedly supported U.S.-backed South Vietnam, afraid that Washington might withdraw American troops stationed in South Korea. About 300,000 Korean troops fought in the war, and they had a fearsome reputation among ordinary Vietnamese.


-Women, Children and elderly killed

Three local officials, including one who said he survived the alleged killings, spoke at length in telephone interviews with Reuters about the events in Binh Dinh. The officials, who declined to be identified, said that in early 1966, Korean troops entered the then Binh An commune, a collection of villages within Tay Son district which they believed was a Viet Cong stronghold. The Koreans were intent on flushing out opposing forces but civilians bore the brunt of their actions, the officials said.

An official at Tay Son's Communist Party history unit said the attacks began in early 1966 and culminated in a massacre of 380 people on February 26, 1966, at a place called Go Dai.
``They (the Korean troops) herded people up onto the hill, shot them and threw grenades,'' he said. ``In some cases they tied old men up... until they died. They tore children apart and threw their (limbs) onto trees,'' he said, adding that some Viet Cong were also killed. The Korean troops threw some bodies into an existing 150-200 metre (500-650 ft) long trench, the official said. Survivors later buried most of the rest of the dead. The names of those who died at Go Dai, along with other known victims of the six-week killing period, were carved on the gravestone, the official said. The number totalled 1,004.


``There has been a lot of propaganda about this in the area, but because no correspondents witnessed it, I think that is why no one outside knows about it,'' he said. One local official who said he survived the attacks reported that the main victims were women, children and the elderly. ``It was all part of a Korean campaign called 'burn all, destroy all and kill all'. They aimed to clear the whole area, which is why they killed old people and children. They also killed cattle, burned houses and paddy (rice),'' he said. A People's Committee official in Tay Son district also confirmed the details, saying 1,200 people were killed. A government official in Hanoi said central authorities had later investigated what happened at Binh Dinh and compiled detailed reports, which showed more than 1,000 people were killed during the period, including around 380 at Go Dai.


-Let bygones be bygones, says Vietnam

However, when asked for comment and to confirm the alleged killings, Vietnam's Foreign Ministry said it did not want to dwell on the matter. Reuters could not visit Binh Dinh to interview survivors. Foreign journalists need approval to report outside Hanoi, and the Foreign Ministry said in December Binh Dinh officials were too busy with the aftermath of recent floods to receive visitors.

``South Korean troops committed crimes against Vietnamese people. With humanitarian and peaceful neighbourly traditions, it is Vietnam's policy to close the past...,'' the Foreign Ministry said in a statement in response to questions. South Korea's embassy in Hanoi has declined to comment on the general issue of Korean actions during the Vietnam War. Asked if Reuters could view official reports on the killings kept at the War Crimes Department within the Ministry of Labour, War Invalids and Social Affairs, the Foreign Ministry said officials there were also too busy.

The accounts of the killings by South Korean troops in Binh Dinh come not long after Seoul launched a probe into an alleged massacre at a village on its own soil by U.S. soldiers in the early days of the 1950-53 Korean War. Villagers and U.S. veterans were quoted as saying hundreds of innocent people were killed by the U.S. military at No Gun Ri. Professor Chun Kyung-soo at Seoul National University, who has spent years researching the role of Korean troops in Vietnam, feels there is a double standard.

``This issue (of Korean actions in Vietnam) has long been very sensitive in Korea,'' Chun told Reuters. Publicity about alleged Korean massacres during the Vietnam War stands in sharp contrast to the events on March 16, 1968, when U.S. troops commanded by Army Lieutenant William Calley entered My Lai village and gunned down 500 civilians. That massacre reverberated around the world when it was exposed and became synonymous with the horror of the conflict.


-Seoul expressed "regret" over wartime actions

During a visit to Hanoi in 1998, South Korean President Kim Dae-jung expressed regret over Korean actions in the Vietnam War, but he did not apologise. Vietnam responded by saying it sought no apology from any nation that fought on its soil. Long-time Vietnam watchers say Hanoi does not like to highlight specific horrors from decades of wars against the French and then the U.S.-backed South Vietnam.

Carl Thayer, an expert on Vietnam at the Asia-Pacific Center for Security Studies in Hawaii, said the killing of civilians by Koreans had largely faded from view because the Vietnam War was mainly seen as an American war. ``Vietnamese propagandists always make a distinction between the American government and the American people,'' he said. ``In their view the Vietnam War was a war launched by a wicked government. Koreans, Thais and Australians were all lackeys. ``It is easier to point the propaganda finger at one enemy, several only clouds the issue,'' he said.

Hanoi also did not want historical baggage to weigh it down as it sought aid and investment from the region, Thayer added.


This post has been edited by tofu101: Sep 20 2007, 11:56 AM
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Eastern_Knight
post Sep 19 2007, 08:11 PM
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^ ignore him,

and please morons/nationalists like Bangaroo, Chucky etc don't respond to this thread.
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misschoihyun
post Sep 19 2007, 08:14 PM
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QUOTE(tofu101 @ Sep 19 2007, 09:08 PM) [snapback]3219395[/snapback]
Yes, I have created a new topic related to SK involvement in VN again.

However, this time I want to take a more serious approach. In this thread I will provide sources in which depicts the crimes commited by SK troops during Vietnam war. Some Koreans believe there were little to no crimes, but as you read these article you will think otherwise. There are few Koreans who find pride in the actions of these Korean troops, but what is there really to be proud of? Did the South Korean troops really went into Vietnam for "humane" reasons, in what some say to "stop the spread of communism?" Or, was their intention totally different? In actuality, US convinced SK to enter Vietnam in exchange for economic and military aid, in which SK could not refuse. As a result, SK troops barged into Vietnam killing over 40,000 Vietnamese lives, including up to 4000 Vietnamese civilians. As for South Korea, their casualty lost amounted up to 4,900 soldiers, with over 11,000 wounded. It is not certain whether all VC death victims were in fact VCs or civilians. So, some believe the Korean killing ratio was 1:15 or 1:25, but nothing is for sure. Nevertheless, both US and SK troops finally surrendered in 75, leaving Vietnam war-torn as VC claimed victory.


I for one am no way proud of what koreans did over in viet, it is a war that koreans should have never fought
but we did go in vietnam like how we went to Iraq
we say it may be for humane reasons,
but in reality all we want is a piece of the spoils,
lets face these facts everyone.
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leigh0211
post Sep 19 2007, 09:04 PM
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This guy has too much time on his hand, please ignore everyone.

-Allison
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byungshinzina
post Sep 20 2007, 06:36 AM
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tell about vietcong & NVA .s war crime ex. hue massacre
they committed crime 100times much more than Allied forces

This post has been edited by byungshinzina: Sep 20 2007, 06:38 AM
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tofu101
post Sep 20 2007, 08:05 AM
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QUOTE(byungshinzina @ Sep 20 2007, 06:36 AM) [snapback]3220510[/snapback]
tell about vietcong & NVA .s war crime ex. hue massacre
they committed crime 100times much more than Allied forces


It is already clear many Koreans are in denial. If you would like to talk about VC crimes then feel free to create a new thread, but the fact that we are talking about Korean crimes shows your insecurity to discuss such topic. By the way, if it not had been America starting the war none of this would've happened. Ho Chi Minh initially wanted democracy, seeking support from America, but they refused to help him. Instead, America resorted to starting a war in which they dragged other nations such as SK into Vietnam killing over 3 million innocent Vietnamese people. South Korea sold out by accepting freebies from America in order to help them industrialize. South Korea "supporting" South Vietnam was untrue and ludacris, otherwise they would not have massacred thousands of innocent lives. Talktohand.gif
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retardsrox
post Sep 20 2007, 08:11 AM
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hey are you dumb or what, we obviously know that there were war crimes. isn't it obvious that any country that invades another country will commit crimes? look at what the japanese did to us
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tofu101
post Sep 20 2007, 08:19 AM
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QUOTE(retardsrox @ Sep 20 2007, 08:11 AM) [snapback]3220705[/snapback]
hey are you dumb or what, we obviously know that there were war crimes. isn't it obvious that any country that invades another country will commit crimes? look at what the japanese did to us


No, retardsrox. It's just some Koreans are unaware or are in denial of the issue. Rather, some resort to 1) brag about kill ratios to boost their self-esteem (Ya, I don't know why either), 2) ignore the subject completely or 3) acknowledge the troop's actions and apologize sincerely.

This post has been edited by tofu101: Sep 20 2007, 09:07 AM
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ICUQB4UQRU
post Sep 20 2007, 09:57 AM
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Well, Koreans in here claim that they know mostly everything to solidly concluded that Korean army or marine "kick butt the enemies." There is even a thread title "Korean marine, the best in the world?" But the fact of the matter is, all sides allied with the U.S. during Vietnam War "kick butt" when it come to killed ratio, by that I mean they fought with artillery support defending some area that is heavily fortify while American air superiority remained unchallenged in South Vietnam. Doing ambush require one to be the jury, the judge and the executioner; don't tell me they were one hundred percent correct all the way (of course this exclude the war-crimes part; I think we all know what Korean do to one another during their war so need not say more.) How is this qualify as "kicking butts?"
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tofu101
post Sep 20 2007, 09:59 AM
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"kicking butt" in murdering people for their own economic and military gain? what a shame, really, and nothing to be proud of. nono.gif

This post has been edited by tofu101: Sep 20 2007, 10:13 AM
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byungshinzina
post Sep 20 2007, 11:33 AM
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QUOTE(tofu101 @ Sep 20 2007, 09:59 AM) [snapback]3220866[/snapback]
"kicking butt" in murdering people for their own economic and military gain? what a shame, really, and nothing to be proud of. nono.gif

why dont claim to america?? embarassedlaugh.gif
american soldier more killed vietcong. vna army..
and mirrai village accident
stop pointless claim

and if u chinese shut da fuk up thumbsdown.gif guess this dude id name

This post has been edited by byungshinzina: Sep 20 2007, 11:35 AM
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tofu101
post Sep 20 2007, 11:47 AM
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QUOTE(byungshinzina @ Sep 20 2007, 11:33 AM) [snapback]3221013[/snapback]
why dont claim to america?? embarassedlaugh.gif
american soldier more killed vietcong. vna army..
and mirrai village accident
stop pointless claim

and if u chinese shut da fuk up thumbsdown.gif guess this dude id name


If you wish to create a new thread related to American war atrocites, do so. But, please, lets mainly focus on Korean war atrocites on this thread. Thanks. kiss.gif
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Jarhier
post Sep 20 2007, 11:47 AM
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QUOTE(byungshinzina @ Sep 20 2007, 06:36 AM) [snapback]3220510[/snapback]
tell about vietcong & NVA .s war crime ex. hue massacre
they committed crime 100times much more than Allied forces


also hiding behind civilians who wore no uniforms. bound to get shot either way. icon_neutral.gif
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byungshinzina
post Sep 20 2007, 12:37 PM
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we need new thread . invader of tibet
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Vitality
post Sep 20 2007, 02:00 PM
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You Viets need to shut the hell up, nobody cares and quit whining.
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tofu101
post Sep 20 2007, 03:41 PM
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QUOTE(Vitality @ Sep 20 2007, 02:00 PM) [snapback]3221195[/snapback]
You Viets need to shut the hell up, nobody cares and quit whining.


Haha, just as I expected. What did I say, either Koreans will 1) ignore the problem and pretend it never existed, 2) brag about kill ratios to boost their self-esteem (not sure why, though), or 3) acknowledge the problem and apologise. It's a shame some Koreans resort to 1 and 2. sure.gif

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misschoihyun
post Sep 20 2007, 04:20 PM
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QUOTE(tofu101 @ Sep 20 2007, 04:41 PM) [snapback]3221311[/snapback]
Haha, just as I expected. What did I say, either Koreans will 1) ignore the problem and pretend it doesnt exist, 2) brag about kill ratios to boost their self-esteem (not sure why, though), or 3) acknowledge the problem and apologise. It's a shame some Koreans resort to 1 and 2. sure.gif


well on behalf of all koreans I respectfully bow down and kneel in apology for war crimes committed by koreans.
we were wrong and we deserve punishment.
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tofu101
post Sep 20 2007, 04:54 PM
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QUOTE(misschoihyun @ Sep 20 2007, 04:20 PM) [snapback]3221374[/snapback]
well on behalf of all koreans I respectfully bow down and kneel in apology for war crimes committed by koreans.
we were wrong and we deserve punishment.


Thank you. Vietnamese people accept and appreciate your apology.
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enomosiki
post Sep 20 2007, 05:10 PM
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QUOTE(tofu101 @ Sep 20 2007, 05:54 PM) [snapback]3221446[/snapback]
Thank you. Vietnamese people accept and appreciate your apology.


What, accept an "apology" from misschoihyun, also known as tradercowboy, who's not even a Korean and continued to lie about his identity for months? If it makes you feel better to accept an "apology" from someone who's claimed how he has served in the USMC and was stationed in Middle East, yet everything he says contradicts this claim, then by all means.
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tofu101
post Sep 20 2007, 05:28 PM
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QUOTE(enomosiki @ Sep 20 2007, 05:10 PM) [snapback]3221470[/snapback]
What, accept an "apology" from misschoihyun, also known as tradercowboy, who's not even a Korean and continued to lie about his identity for months? If it makes you feel better to accept an "apology" from someone who's claimed how he has served in the USMC and was stationed in Middle East, yet everything he says contradicts this claim, then by all means.


Okay. kiss.gif
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