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Do other SEA countries beside Vietnam use chopsticks?
fainaru
post Oct 16 2008, 09:10 PM
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QUOTE(hugo boss @ Oct 2 2008, 04:42 PM) [snapback]3947885[/snapback]
probably because Filipinos have more Spanish influence in their culture and less asian, when Im at a Filipino festival, it's very similiar to Mexican culture, I dont see much asian influence.

the clothing styles, the religion, the traditions, etc has a strong Spanish influence.


Sorry, but I'm going to have to disagree with you there just a little bit. Yes, Spanish influence has definitely intertwined itself within Filipino culture (hundreds of years of colonization will do the trick), but Filipino culture has always kept its "Asian" roots and mentality. Filipinos do, indeed, have Latin/Spanish festivals but I don't necessarily think that that constitutes Filipino culture as "less asian and more spanish"; the lack of using chopsticks does not constitute that idea as well. Philippines, prior to Spanish colonization, has had much contact with its neighboring Asian countries, and that, undoubtedly has had a profound effect on Filipino culture, and can still be seen today.

While I was a home stay in the Philippines, I realized that families were still very Confucian, (as with many traditional Asian families) in that each family member had a role they were responsible for. If you observe carefully, much of modern day Philippines still retains its Asian roots, regardless of the fact that the Spaniards had control of the Philippines for hundreds of years. The Philippines, after all, borrowed and adopted quite a bit from Chinese culture, such as their farming methods and model of family hierarchy.

As an observer of this culture, I don't think attending a few Filipino festivals would be able to provide you with enough conclusive evidence to prove that the Philippines is, indeed, "less asian and more asian". I think that someone would really need to go to the Philippines and stay with a family to grasp a deeper understanding of Filipino culture, and only then would someone be able to see that Filipinos are still very much "Asian" both in mentality and in life.

------

Sorry for the banter, as I know this is about chopsticks, and not necessarily a thread on culture per se.

Actually, many SEA countries today still use traditional ways of eating. Malays, Indonesians, and Filipinos in particular, from time to time, still use hands to eat their food on banana leaves, although much of the population have now favored using the Fork and Spoon method as the "norm". I do believe that Thais often use forks and spoons as well, but utilize the chopsticks when eating noodle dishes.

This post has been edited by fainaru: Oct 17 2008, 12:09 AM
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anakjakarta84
post Oct 22 2008, 02:02 PM
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As reported by all of you from the country that most uses chopsticks Vietnam to the least the Philippines:

In Vietnam: Use chopstick for everything other than soup
In Laos: chopstick used for noodle dishes
In Cambodia: Use chopsticks for noodles
In Thailand: Use chopstick for noodles and spoon and fork for rice
In Malaysia: The Chinese use chopsticks, Indians and Malays use hands
In Indonesia: Use forks and spoons for normally, hands traditionally and chopsticks for certain noodles
In the Philippines: use hands traditionally, use spoons and forks normally

In Myanmar: ??
In Singapore: probably like Malaysia?
In Brunei: probably like Malaysia?
In East Timor: ??


QUOTE(Majapahitans @ Oct 7 2008, 03:10 PM) [snapback]3954882[/snapback]
Indonesians usually use spoon and fork to eat, seldom or never using knive like european did, except on eating steak ofcourse. But if we eating in our traditional way, usually we uses our bare hands.

However if we eat Chinese, Korean, or Japanese food; using chopsticks (sumpit, in bahasa Indonesia) is a must.
Actually I quite good on using it, I can hold small grain of rice, nut or bean with it. I remember eating in Chinese or Japanese restaurant and spotted some Indonesian Chinese descends made mistakes on holding his chopsticks, Even Chinese can be terrible on using chopsticks.


But we also use it outside of Chinese/Japanese restaurants like by street vendors or pedagang kaki lima that are selling noodles like bakmi, mie pangsit, mie ayam. Omg, I'm drooling...

QUOTE(fainaru @ Oct 17 2008, 04:10 AM) [snapback]3969438[/snapback]
Sorry, but I'm going to have to disagree with you there just a little bit. Yes, Spanish influence has definitely intertwined itself within Filipino culture (hundreds of years of colonization will do the trick), but Filipino culture has always kept its "Asian" roots and mentality. Filipinos do, indeed, have Latin/Spanish festivals but I don't necessarily think that that constitutes Filipino culture as "less asian and more spanish"; the lack of using chopsticks does not constitute that idea as well. Philippines, prior to Spanish colonization, has had much contact with its neighboring Asian countries, and that, undoubtedly has had a profound effect on Filipino culture, and can still be seen today.


My opinion on Filipino culture (in general),
Music: Spanish
Dances: Spanish
Outfit: Spanish
Religion: Spanish (Middle Eastern if you go to the roots)
Mentality: Asian
Language: Asian
Food: Asian
Values: Asian
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thewiseguy
post Oct 22 2008, 10:22 PM
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Cambodia = chopsticks for noodles, Spoon and forks normally.
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XigonCongchua
post Oct 23 2008, 12:19 AM
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QUOTE(anakjakarta84 @ Oct 22 2008, 12:02 PM) [snapback]3978722[/snapback]
As reported by all of you from the country that most uses chopsticks Vietnam to the least the Philippines:

In Vietnam: Use chopstick for everything other than soup
In Laos: chopstick used for noodle dishes
In Cambodia: Use chopsticks for noodles
In Thailand: Use chopstick for noodles and spoon and fork for rice
In Malaysia: The Chinese use chopsticks, Indians and Malays use hands
In Indonesia: Use forks and spoons for normally, hands traditionally and chopsticks for certain noodles
In the Philippines: use hands traditionally, use spoons and forks normally

In Myanmar: ??
In Singapore: probably like Malaysia?
In Brunei: probably like Malaysia?
In East Timor: ??

no chopsticks when eating egg rolls and spring rolls either
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datumarco
post Oct 23 2008, 02:20 AM
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QUOTE(XigonCongchua @ Oct 1 2008, 11:30 PM) [snapback]3946824[/snapback]
A Vietnamese meal usually have four parts
- rice
- meat
- vegetables
- broth

Each person in the family will get a small bowl of rice. In the middle of the table there are dishes of meat and vegetables and a big bowl of broth. Members in the family pick up food from the dishes in the center into their rice bowl ~ chopsticks are more convenient for us because it's easier to pick up the meat and the vegetables into our rice bowl, forks can't pick up vegetables and plus the food always get stuck in fork, with chopsticks you can drop the food down into your rice bowl easily.
Usually we have the broth after finishing the rice and this is when we use spoon.


Yep, Malays - filipinos, indonesians nad malaysians (the ethnic ones) just use their hands.
We have traditional eating utensitls that are like spoons - they're made of wood or bamboo or coconut shells though. but it more fun if you just your hands. hehe biggthumpup.gif
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fainaru
post Nov 11 2008, 09:39 PM
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QUOTE(anakjakarta84 @ Oct 22 2008, 02:02 PM) [snapback]3978722[/snapback]
As reported by all of you from the country that most uses chopsticks Vietnam to the least the Philippines:

In Vietnam: Use chopstick for everything other than soup
In Laos: chopstick used for noodle dishes
In Cambodia: Use chopsticks for noodles
In Thailand: Use chopstick for noodles and spoon and fork for rice
In Malaysia: The Chinese use chopsticks, Indians and Malays use hands
In Indonesia: Use forks and spoons for normally, hands traditionally and chopsticks for certain noodles
In the Philippines: use hands traditionally, use spoons and forks normally

In Myanmar: ??
In Singapore: probably like Malaysia?
In Brunei: probably like Malaysia?
In East Timor: ??
But we also use it outside of Chinese/Japanese restaurants like by street vendors or pedagang kaki lima that are selling noodles like bakmi, mie pangsit, mie ayam. Omg, I'm drooling...
My opinion on Filipino culture (in general),
Music: Spanish
Dances: Spanish
Outfit: Spanish
Religion: Spanish (Middle Eastern if you go to the roots)
Mentality: Asian
Language: Asian
Food: Asian
Values: Asian


During my stay in the Philippines, I was able to experience quite a vast amount of culture in a relatively short period of time (about 7 months). I must say, though, that while many of the things I saw were modern, I also did see traditional things such as Filipino dance, as well as music, and I was even fortunate enough to see traditional Filipino clothing. If you search up "traditional filipino art/dance/clothing/music", or something along those lines, you'll be quite surprised to see the similarities those particular things have with Malay culture. Yes, Spanish culture has, indeed, intertwined itself in Filipino culture, but traditional music and dancing are still widely practiced. Take a look at Kulintang and Singkil.
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CheamKhmer
post Nov 11 2008, 09:45 PM
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yes cambodian use chopstick for noodles, and rice , soup and other we used fork and spoon.
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thewiseguy
post Nov 12 2008, 12:30 AM
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QUOTE(CheamKhmer @ Nov 11 2008, 06:45 PM) [snapback]4004606[/snapback]
yes cambodian use chopstick for noodles, and rice , soup and other we used fork and spoon.

we dont use chopsticks for rice. Lmao. Cambodians only use chopsticks for noodles.
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Purplenipple
post Nov 12 2008, 05:06 PM
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Before French influence
-Ate rice, meat, and other dry dishes with hands.
-Use wooden spoons for wet dishes.
-Drank from a bowl like cup.

After French
-rice is eaten with hand or spoon. Chopsticks are rarely used.
-Dry dishes are eaten with hands, forks and chopsticks are used as carrying utensils.
-Use chopsticks for noodles.
-Use cups or bowls for drink, depends on how prestige the meal is. In prestige meals, silver bowls are used along with traditional wooden utensils.

This post has been edited by Purplenipple: Nov 12 2008, 05:07 PM
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CheamKhmer
post Nov 12 2008, 10:28 PM
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QUOTE(thewiseguy @ Nov 12 2008, 12:30 AM) [snapback]4004888[/snapback]
we dont use chopsticks for rice. Lmao. Cambodians only use chopsticks for noodles.


yea i know my bad i put the commas wrong, cambodian use chopstick for noodles, rice and anyting else is fork and spoon
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Zaw-Gyi
post Nov 14 2008, 11:33 AM
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QUOTE(anakjakarta84 @ Oct 22 2008, 07:02 PM) [snapback]3978722[/snapback]
As reported by all of you from the country that most uses chopsticks Vietnam to the least the Philippines:

In Vietnam: Use chopstick for everything other than soup
In Laos: chopstick used for noodle dishes
In Cambodia: Use chopsticks for noodles
In Thailand: Use chopstick for noodles and spoon and fork for rice
In Malaysia: The Chinese use chopsticks, Indians and Malays use hands
In Indonesia: Use forks and spoons for normally, hands traditionally and chopsticks for certain noodles
In the Philippines: use hands traditionally, use spoons and forks normally

In Myanmar: ??



Similar to Laos , Cambodia and Thailand


Traditional : hands for rice apart from fried rice = with spoon , soup spoons for soups and noodle soups eg mohinga , ohn no khauk swe , chopsticks for noodles

Modern : spoon and fork for rice , the rest is the same
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CheamKhmer
post Nov 14 2008, 11:12 PM
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who gives an f if u use chopstick of or not, as long as giving an opportunity and u can use it then ur cool! i knew how to use it since i was 9. i use it depending on what i am eatting wether its fish or noodles, fish is stinky and i prefer using chopstick on fish.
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hugo boss
post Nov 14 2008, 11:58 PM
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QUOTE(CheamKhmer @ Nov 14 2008, 08:12 PM) [snapback]4009030[/snapback]
who gives an f if u use chopstick of or not, as long as giving an opportunity and u can use it then ur cool! i knew how to use it since i was 9. i use it depending on what i am eatting wether its fish or noodles, fish is stinky and i prefer using chopstick on fish.


when Cambodians eat in a Chinese restaurant, do you use your hands to eat the rice? or a fork? if chop sticks are available?

it would look very unusual seeing a person use their hands to eat rice in a US restaurant

This post has been edited by hugo boss: Nov 14 2008, 11:59 PM
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CheamKhmer
post Nov 15 2008, 12:00 AM
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QUOTE(hugo boss @ Nov 14 2008, 11:58 PM) [snapback]4009132[/snapback]
when Cambodians eat in a Chinese restaurant, do you use your hands to eat the rice? if chop sticks are available?

it would look very unusual seeing a person use their hands to eat rice in a US restaurant


lol your crazy using hands is dated back in the days. Thank god to mans genious design we use fork and spoons lol. But yes that have occur with when i went to some restaranct and all they had is chopstick, we didnt ask for silverware we just resort to what we already knew how to use which is chopstikcs.
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BamarMinthar
post Nov 15 2008, 09:18 AM
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When a certain Burmese man goes to a Chinese restaurant, that certain man capitulates within the first 10 minutes and has to ask for a fork!!
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sitenbull
post Nov 15 2008, 01:15 PM
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I like using a spoon chopsticks are good for noodles but I love my Spoon matter of fact the Spoon is my favorite sex position
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ircer
post Nov 17 2008, 03:14 AM
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Definitely, not native Malaysia, Indonesian and Khmer unless they're Chinese descendent.
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InitialDJay
post Nov 27 2008, 02:49 AM
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QUOTE(salamat @ Oct 1 2008, 06:22 PM) [snapback]3946401[/snapback]
In the Philippines we use our hands to eat...thats the traditional way
but most normal people use spoons and forks

use hands to eat, even with rice? confused.gif
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