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KKK(Katipunan) treasures- source of wealth of the Cojuangco dynasty?, The General Antonio Luna - Donya Ysidra Cojuangco scandal :) jk
trismegistos
post Mar 11 2010, 12:40 AM
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Since two of our presidential aspirants came from this clan and since justice is not yet been given to the victims of those killed in Hacienda Luisita and to the farmers who were tied to almost perpetual serfhood, might as well create a thread about the Cojuangco-Luna connection.

According to rumors, the treasure trove of the Katipunan was passed on to Luna and, then finally, to his beloved Ysidra Cojuangco for safe-keeping. But from the investigations done by Manapat et al, the treasures entrusted to Ysidra Cojuangco by Gen. Luna actually came from the parishes of Pampanga and Ilocos during the time when the Americans were actively pursuing President Aguinaldo. Now, instead of giving it back to the Filipino people, Ysidra thought of using the treasure in enriching her family clan.

THIS IS A SERIES OF OF 8 PARTS:

FIRST: Where did the Cojuangcos’ wealth really come from? (READ FURTHER BELOW)

SECOND: The Cojuangco Family tree http://www.asiafinest.com/forum/index.php?...t&p=4460067

THIRD: Part One: Seeking the Holy Grail on Good Friday
by Larry Henares http://www.asiafinest.com/forum/index.php?...t&p=4460068

FOURTH: Part Two: Which Cojuangco is the love-child of Luna? - by Larry Henares http://www.asiafinest.com/forum/index.php?...t&p=4460073

FIFTH: Part Three: Is Tonyboy C. the great grandson of Luna?
by Larry Henares http://www.asiafinest.com/forum/index.php?...t&p=4460076

SIXTH: Part Four: The Love Story of Ysidra and Antonio Luna - The Road of Destiny http://www.asiafinest.com/forum/index.php?...t&p=4460089

SEVENTH: From Do'a Ysidra came the Cojuangco fortune http://www.asiafinest.com/forum/index.php?...t&p=4460090

EIGHT: The Cojuangcos: A Story of a Philippine Family in 9 Parts http://raulcibanez.blogspot.com/2009/10/co...ine-family.html

----------------------------





Where did the Cojuangcos’ wealth really come from?
Written by Earl G. Parreño
Thursday, 24 September 2009

Neighbors didn’t believe the family made it all from rice milling, trading, and money lending

(Fourth of 9 parts)

At the turn of the century, with the Spanish forces decisively defeated by the Filipino revolutionaries, the first Philippine Republic was established. In ceremonies held at the Barasoain Church in Malolos, Bulacan, on January 23, 1899, General Emilio Aguinaldo was proclaimed president of the republic and the Constitution was approved. Unfortunately, the republic did not live long as the Americans colonized the nation and crushed the republic in a bloody war that lasted until 1902.

The Philippine-American War, which had begun in February 4, 1899, caused unparalleled grief to millions of Filipinos. The US occupation army killed an estimated 200,000 people as the Filipino revolutionaries persisted in their struggle to keep the country free from foreign rule. The economy was in shambles, unable to bear the brunt of the war that began in 1896. The fortunes of many prominent families dwindled but a lucky few—like the Cojuangcos—prospered from it.

By 1901, the Cojuangco landholdings, under the name of Ingkong Jose, Ysidra or Melecio, had extended to other towns in Tarlac like Gerona, Camiling, La Paz and Moncada as well as to the adjoining provinces of Nueva Ecija and Pangasinan. In less than five years after resettling in Tarlac, the Cojuangco family acquired almost 2,000 hectares of agricultural land along the railway in Paniqui, well up to Nueva Ecija and Pangasinan.

The family’s economic bonanza was indeed impressive, especially since it was realized at a time when agricultural production in Tarlac was in a dismal state. Rice fields then were covered by sand left by floods. Government reports during this period indicated that drought and locusts had destroyed many crops. But the fortune acquired by the Cojuangcos had puzzled many of their neighbors even then. They knew the family depended on the income from their rice milling and trading business for the money that they lent out. With the calamities that had plagued rice lands, however, the neighbors wondered, surely the Cojuangco money could not have all come from rice milling and trading alone.

It was all the fruit of hard work, frugality and good business sense, they were told. Still, this explanation did not stop stories from swirling around about the “real” source of the Cojuangcos’ now-fabled wealth. One account, written in 1987 by Hilarion Henares, the newspaper columnist who coined the moniker “Pacman” for Danding, cited a study reportedly made by Carlos Quirino, the former director of the National Library. Henares wrote in the Philippine Daily Inquirer:

General Antonio Luna, as chief of staff of the revolutionary army, had collected a sizeable sum from contributions with which to pay his soldiers. The person who collected for him was Tiburcio Hilario, Pampanga governor. Hilario’s granddaughter, Ambassador Rafaelita Hilario Soriano, relates that her grandfather kept the gold and silver in sacks, including gold plates, chalices, and other church treasures taken from Bacolor, San Fernando, and Guagua.

After losing an encounter at Sto. Tomas, Pampanga, Luna ordered Hilario to bring the valuables to Tarlac, where the revolutionary government planned to establish its capital. General Luna, so the story goes, then turned over the treasure to Ysidra Cojuangco, then an attractive 32-year-old woman, for safekeeping. Then Luna proceeded to Cabanatuan to meet with Aguinaldo, there to be assassinated by [Aguinaldo’s] troops.

Why did the general entrust Ysidra with the treasure? Rumors had it that she was his sweetheart and lover, and he entrusted her to keep the treasure till he returned…
Another account said that General Luna sired Ysidra’s son, who was also named Antonio but was claimed by Melecio and Tecla as their third son. The story goes that during the Philippine-American war, Luna had tried to control the Manila-Dagupan railway since this was a vital facility for communications and transportation, as it was during the earlier war against Spain. It was supposedly in one of Luna’s trips to the north that he met Ysidra, who lived very near the train station. And when the Filipino troops were retreating to the north during the war against the US, he may have renewed his ties with her.

http://newsbreak.com.ph/index.php?option=c...Itemid=88889066

This post has been edited by trismegistos: Mar 11 2010, 08:35 AM
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trismegistos
post Mar 11 2010, 12:46 AM
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The Cojuangco Family tree



http://jaimedelacruzblog.blogspot.com/2010...amily-tree.html
QUOTE
The Cojuangco Family Tree
Co Yu Hwan
The great grandfather of Corazon Aquino, he was from Tongan Province in China. He was baptized Catholic with Filipino name Jose Cojuangco (Ingkong) . He married Antena Estrella and had three children; two girls and one boy. Ysidra? (Isila) was born in 1867; Melecio in 1871 and Chanita(Trinidd) in 1896/ From Malolos, the whole family transferred to Tarlac.

Melecio Cojuangco

Melecio Cojuangco was the son of Co Yu Hwan alias Jose Cojuangco (Ingkong) and the grandfather of Cory Aquino. He married a Chinese mestiza, Tiakla Chico in 1894. He was the first politician in the family. He became a representative of the first District of Tarlac in the First Philippine Legislature from 1907 to 1909.

Among their children were Jose Cojuangco Sr., Antonio, and Eduardo Cojuangco.

THE Father, the uncles, cousins and nephews:

Jose Cojuangco II or Jose Cojuangco Sr. was the father of Cory Aquino. He married Demetria Sumulong. He was representative of the First District of Tarlac to 10th Philippine Legislature in 1934-41 and in the National Assembly in 1944-46.

The couple had eight children where Cory was the sixth.

Jose Cojuangco Jr. is the younger brother of Cory who is married to Margarita Tingting Cojuangco.

He was the representative of the First district of Tarlac to the House of Representatives for the periods 1962-68 and 1987-1998.

His wife Tingting Cojuangco was elected Governor of Tarlac for the period 1992-1998.

They have five children; Luisita Immaculada Angeles Alexandra, Josephine Victoria, Mikaela Ma. Antonia, Margarita Demetria, Regina Patricia Jose.

Eduardo Cojuangco Sr. – brother of Jose Cojuangco Sr., uncle of Corazon Aquino.

He married Josephine Murphy. He is the father of Eduardo Danding Cojuangco and Merceditas Cojuangco.

He was the Governor of Tarlac in the 1940s.

Eduardo “Danding” Cojuangco Jr. is the cousin of Corazon Aquino. He was the representative of the First District of Tarlac in 1969-72. He is the chairman of San Miguel Corporation and owns other business conglomerates. He run in presidential election in 1992 but lost. He is married to Soledad Oppen. He is the father of Charlie and Marcos Cojuangco.

Carlos “Charlie” Cojuangco is a nephew of Cory Aquino. He is the Representative of the 4th district of Negros Occidental since 1998 to present. He was a former mayor.
His wife was the late Rio Diaz.

Marcos “Mark” Cojuangco is a nephew of Cory Aquino. He is the Representative of the First District of Tarlac from 2001 to present.

Mercedes Cojuangco Teodoro is the cousin of Cory Aquino and the sister of Eduardo “Danding” Cojuangco.

She was an assemblywoman in 1978 to 1986. She was married to Gilberto Teodot Sr, a former SSS Administrator.

She is the mother of Gilberto Teodoro Jr.

Gilberto Teodoro Jr. is the Secretary of the National Defense and was a Representative of the First District of Tarlac from 1998 to 2007.

He is running for presidential election in 2010. His wife Monica Prieto-Cojuangco replaced him as Representative of the First District of Tarlac.

Antonio Cojuangco Sr. – the uncle of Cory Aquino and the brother of Jose Cojuangco Sr.
He was not a politician. He married Victoria Uytuico and had a son, Ramon.

Ramon Cojuangco –is the cousin of Cory Aquino. He married Imelda Ongsiako. Their son is Tony “Boy “ Cojuangco who was married and separated from Denise Yabut and now is the companion of Gretchen Barreto.

http://blog.cathcath.com/the-family-tree-o...quino-6738.html


This post has been edited by trismegistos: Mar 11 2010, 03:14 AM
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trismegistos
post Mar 11 2010, 12:48 AM
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Part One: Seeking the Holy Grail on Good Friday
by Larry Henares

http://www.philippinefolio.com/contdetail....p;id_app3=00366

"Finally I met him, this wonderful writer-researcher-computer hack, with the mischief of Shakespeare's Puck, the prankish antics of an Irish leprechaun, and physical size to match, whose book Some Are Smarter Than Others and pamphlet Coco-dile File played a crucial role in the election of Fidel V. Ramos as President, and whose latest Wrong Number provided the final coffin nail to the PLDT monopoly.
Finally I met him after a year of the two of us searching for each other's address and phone number, and missing each other like Evangeline's ships in the night. I met him on Good Friday when he showed up in my house in Dasmarińas Village in the company of Ka Luis Taruc (former Huk Supremo), armed with three questions: Now that you stopped writing your columns, whom shall I quote in my future works (my articles infest his bibliographies!)? Was there ever any admission on the part of the Cojuangco family that the source of their original wealth is the hero Antonio Luna? Whatever happened to the alleged love-child born of Ysidra Cojuangco and Antonio Luna?
The first question is answered by this series of articles which Ric Manapat helped research on and which he now calls The Story of the Century, all ready to be further elaborated on and researched by him as he did my past articles. The second and third questions are answered in the body of this series.
Finally there is one credible witness who quotes Ysidra Cojuangco herself admitting that Antonio Luna used to bring her gold, not once but regularly during the Philippine American War and our First Republic, almost till the day he died.
And incredibly, we have found ample evidence to conclude that the love child of Ysidra and Luna might have survived, adopted by her brother Melecio, and may be one of the four sons of Melecio: either Jose, father of ex-President Corazon Aquino; Juan, the twice-married, childless one; Antonio, the father of Ramon and the grandfather of PLDT's president; or Eduardo, the father of presidential candidate Danding Cojuangco. Which one? Well, read the rest of this series to find out.
Holy Week in the past has always been the time of terrible accidents in my family, and I hesitated to join Ric Manapat when he suggested “tracing 30 pieces of silver on a Good Friday.” But the roads were clear of traffic, and Manapat is such a good driver that I even sat in the “death seat” near to the air conditioner without a seat belt, as he negotiated the distance to Kawit, Cavite, in 20 minutes instead of the usual two hours.
Ric, Ka Luis and myself were joined by Dr. Steve Latorre, brilliant UP professor and ex-Opus Dei priest now working in Malacańang as my executive assistant, as we set out to find Ka Luis' friend Ka Alfredo Saulo, ex-political detainee, historian and biographer, now curator of the Aguinaldo Museum in Kawit, who is the nephew of Eulalio Saulo. Eulalio with his brothers (under General Martin Tinio) supervised, in Ka Fred Saulo's words, “the convoy of carts loaded with a huge amount of Spanish gold and silver coins seized from local treasuries in the Ilocos region, leading this convoy through forested areas up to the final destination in Paniqui, Tarlac, in the house of Ysidra Cojuangco, girlfriend of General Antonio Luna.”
We were hoping for some old letters, some documentary evidence in the hands of Ka Fred Saulo. No such luck, but Ka Fred told us of a cousin, Encarnacion Saulo-Padilla, favorite daughter of Eulalio, almost 93 years of age, who as a young girl was a good friend and confidante of Ysidra Cojuangco herself (who died in the 1960).
A little background here. There was an earlier account recounted by historian Carlos Quirino in an unpublished book commissioned by Danding Cojuangco, about a shipment of gold vessels commandeered by General Antonio Luna from churches in Pampanga, collected for him by Tiburcio Hilario, Pampanga governor, brought to Paniqui and entrusted to Ysidra for safekeeping before Luna left for Cabanatuan to meet Aguinaldo, only to be assassinated there. Aha, so gold was brought by Luna from both the Ilocos (through Saulo) and Central Luzon (through Hilario) to Ysidra! With the First Republic on the run and the Americans inquiring about the gold, Ysidra dumped the gold into a well, retrieved it later and used it to build the Cojuangco fortune. I jokingly suggested in the presence of Cory Aquino, in a birthday party of Joker Arroyo, that the Cojuangco fortune is subject to sequestration by the PCGG. It was also jokingly pointed out that in this case the statute of limitations defining a prescription period for the prosecution of past crimes, is in force. But apparently no one, not even Cory, read her own 1987 Constitution, Article 11, section 15, which stipulates: “The right of the State to recover properties unlawfully acquired by public officials or employees, from them or from their nominees or transferees, shall not be barred by prescriptions, laches or estoppel.” Our irreverent foursome, joined by Ka Fred Saulo, who would pursue their Holy Grail on Good Friday, drove to Heroes Hill, Quezon City, to see Encarnacion Saulo-Padilla. Bed-ridden but sound of mind, she was irrepressible, regaling us with stories of Dońa Ysidra, her neighbor in Sta. Rosa, Nueva Ecija, whom she met when she was 10 years old, and who was going to be her godmother, ninang sa casal, were it not for the distance and difficulty of travel. We recorded her saying that Ysidra admitted that Luna was indeed her very close friend, and that Luna left her valuables, not once but regularly on many occasions. When asked how much value was involved, Encarnacion replied that while she is not sure of the exact value, it was certainly in huge quantities since several huge caskets were involved. Manapat asked her if she knew that there were more than one shipment. She emphatically said yes, the shipments were a regular thing!! Not only was Encarnacion a friend and confidant of Dońa Ysidra, she is also the daughter of Eulalio Saulo who confirmed to her the story as one of the military escorts of the gold shipment to Ysidra. As far as we know this is the first direct evidence of a Cojuangco (and Ysidra at that) admitting what many Luna contemporaries long alleged, that the source of the Cojuangco fortune was the gold commandeered by Luna and regularly turned over to Ysidra. The combined assets controlled by the Cojuangcos total about P200 billion. To recover such wealth under Article 11, section 15 of the 1987 Constitution, one must go to court, and pay a filing fee of half a percent of the amount to be recovered, or P1 billion unrefundable win or lose. Who has that kind of money to risk? Ric Manapat suggests that the three wealthy branches be sued for P1 each. Once the case is won, then the rest of the P200 billion may be sued for. Or alternatively, Manapat suggests that the PCGG pursue the matter with funds appropriated by Congress, the funds merely transferred from one government pocket to another. Oh what the heck, he is probably joking, and this Good Friday caper may just be a mere exercise in the quest for historical truth. The last question of Ric Manapat as to whatever happened to the love-child of Ysidra Cojuangco and General Antonio Luna, is answered after a quest akin to that of Sir Galahad for the Holy Grail, taking us through interesting by-ways, dead-ends, winding trails, backtracking mazes, and finally to El Camino Real, the road of destiny of the Filipino people, of General Aguinaldo, of Ysidra and Luna, and of the four sons of Melecio Cojuangco."

This post has been edited by trismegistos: Mar 11 2010, 12:52 AM
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trismegistos
post Mar 11 2010, 01:03 AM
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http://www.philippinefolio.com/contdetail....p;id_app3=00367


Part Two: Which Cojuangco is the love-child of Luna? - by Larry Henares

Luis Taruc recounts a joke that dates back to the last century, about a Spanish priest who was enraged to find his cows' ears cut off, and ordered an investigation by the sacristan. The sacristan said, “No need to do that, Padre. Everyone knows that you can manufacture ears to replace the missing ones!” How is that? asked the priest. “Well,” answered the sacristan, “You have often been overheard telling the pregnant women in the parish, whose husbands are out of town, that they should regularly visit you at night, because their unborn baby may need ears which only the priest can provide in good order.” Catholic bishops when installed in office make a solemn oath to preserve the Baptismal Registers entrusted to them above all things, especially during fires and natural disasters. Many entries in these old records register the baptisms of children born with unnamed fathers. Whatever happened to the alleged love child of Ysidra Cojuangco and General Antonio Luna? We assure the reader that there is nothing to be ashamed of in being the only descendant of our national hero Antonio Luna who has an illustrious bloodline known for brilliance of intellect and genius. The love child of Ysidra and Luna is not illegitimate; he would be classified as “hijo natural,” natural son, because Ysidra and Luna were both single, eligible to be married, and their relationship was not adulterous. Moreover, such a child would still be a Cojuangco in addition to being a Luna. We all drove to the house of Carlos Quirino in Ayala Alabang, and found him in good health and willing to help at age 83. According to historian Carlos Quirino's unpublished manuscript on the Cojuangco family, Ysidra Cojuangco, spinster in her thirties, gave birth to a son outside the bounds of matrimony, which the Cojuangco family claims was sired by an unnamed Chinese mestizo who died before he could marry her. The family claimed further that the love child also died in infancy. But there are others, specially those in family of Tecla Chichioco (wife of Melecio), and many other independent witnesses, who say that Ysidra was Luna's sweetheart and that the child was sired by General Luna. There is absolutely no record we can find to prove that the child died and was buried. Assuming for the sake of argument that the love-child survived to manhood, it is only logical to assume that the baby would have been adopted by Ysidra's brother Melecio and his wife, who were childless for two years after their wedding. Which of the four Cojuangco boys is the love child of General Antonio Luna? Is he Jose, the father of Cory Aquino and her siblings who now own Hacienda Luisita? Juan who married twice and was childless? Antonio, killed by the Japanese, father of Ramon and the grandfather of Tonyboy, the president of PLDT and former chairman of the Philippine Air Lines? Or Eduardo, the father of Danding Cojuangco, alleged Marcos crony, lately chairman of San Miguel Corporation and Cocobank, who almost made it to the presidency of the Republic? We can only deduce this if we know the birthdate and the time the baby was conceived, and whether or not Antonio Luna was in the Philippines to do the impregnation. Additionally there are certain characteristics of the Lunas that are admittedly not present in the Cojuangco clan, and may be matched with those of the alleged son of Luna. The first candidate for this distinction is Jose, the father of Cory, Pete and Peping Cojuangco. He was born according to Carlos Quirino on March 19, 1896. According to his tombstone in Manila Memorial Park, his birth date is July 3, 1896. And according to an entry in the Baptismal Registry of Barasoain Church (Malolos, Bulacan), dated July 8, 1896, he was baptized, “un nińo de seis dias nacido,” a child six days old, which puts his birthdate at July 2, 1896. Whatever birthdate, Jose may have been conceived in the womb of Ysidra between July and October 1895. At the time Luna was in the Philippines, having affairs all over the place and earning a reputation as a ladies' man and loverboy.
In March 1896, according to Quirino, the Cojuangco family moved from its residence in Malolos, Bulacan, and resettled permanently far to the north, in Paniqui, Tarlac. Why travel several hundred kilometers away in a horse cart with a pregnant mother, or the newly born baby Jose, unless trying to escape from the effects of a family scandal??? The next candidate is the childless Juan. He was born on April 18, 1898 in Paniqui; if so, he was conceived August 1897. Six months before, February 1897, Luna left for Spain, and was in Barcelona at the time Juan was conceived, and did not come back till May 1898 via Hong Kong. So Antonio Luna could not be the father of Juan. The next is Antonio Cojuangco, father of Ramon and grandfather of Tonyboy, the president of the Philippine Long Distance Co, (PLDT). His birthdate was not available in the book of Carlos Quirino, so we will leave him awhile, and go to the next candidate, Eduardo Cojuangco, father of businessman and presidential candidate, Danding Cojuangco. Eduardo Cojuangco (the elder) was born on October 13, 1904, having been conceived in the womb in February 1904, long after Antonio Luna was assassinated on June 5, 1899. Therefore Eduardo could not have been the son of Luna. Ysidra's brother, Melecio Cojuangco, aggrieved by an argument with two Americans claiming the seats of his sons, died of a heart attack on a train on the way to Paniqui on March 13, 1909. Of all his heirs only Jose and Antonio may be suspected of being the love child of Ysidra Cojuangco and Antonio Luna. The only missing link is the birthdate of Antonio C. Cojuangco. A check with the Tonyboy's office at the PLDT, drew a blank; nobody there knew. Who would know? Carlos Quirino cannot explain how he missed this date. Even the birthdate of Martin, the original Cojuangco born in Amoy, is known and documented, so why not Antonio? We figured there will be a record in the man's tomb, so we went to the family mausoleum (Plaza of Dignity, Lot 405-406) in the Manila Memorial Park. There was none; and even the tombs of his wife and his son Ramon were unmarked by any dates, even though their dates of birth and death are known. Only the names appeared. Was this a deliberate act to hide the fact that Antonio's birthdate is secret? The tombs of his brother Jose and wife Demetria in the next lot were marked by dates in the usual way. Another curious thing. Records at Manila Memorial show that the remains of Antonio Cojuangco, killed in 1945 in the Liberation of Manila, was originally buried in La Loma Cemetery in Quezon City. When it was transferred to Manila Memorial, the latter noted that there TWO bodies in the crypt – it was claimed that the other body was that of his Chinese amah (yaya). Really now, is it possible that Ysidra Cojuangco who survived to the 1960s, put the body of Antonio Luna there with Antonio Cojuangco? Where is the body of Antonio Luna? Ricardo Manapat, Steve Latorre and myself went to the Ateneo Archives in Loyola Heights, and looked over the appropriate Alumni Directory of Ateneo de Manila. All four siblings were listed on the same page. Jose graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1915; Juan in 1916; Antonio in 1918; Eduardo in 1920. There is an 8 year gap between the birth of the eldest Jose (1896) and the youngest Eduardo (1904), yet there is only a 5 year gap between the dates of their college graduation. Does that mean that Jose started his schooling late and Eduardo started early? Or does it mean that their stated birthdays, that of Antonio especially, are not accurate?
Between the dates of birth of the second born Juan (1898) and the last born Eduardo (1904) is a gap of four years, as there is between their dates of graduation (Juan, 1916; and Eduardo, 1920) with Antonio graduating exactly halfway between (1918). Was the third son Antonio was born halfway between the second (1898) and fourth son (1904), that is, in the year 1900?
No, the Ateneo Annual of 1918 listed Antonio's birth year as 1899, the month undetermined.
With this crucial data of Antonio's birthdate, the way is now paved for our final conclusion as to which of the four Cojuangco boys is most likely to be the love child of Ysidra Cojuangco and General Antonio Luna.
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trismegistos
post Mar 11 2010, 01:06 AM
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http://www.philippinefolio.com/contdetail....p;id_app3=00368

Part Three: Is Tonyboy C. the great grandson of Luna?
by Larry Henares

The first Jose Cojuangco, father of Melecio and Ysidra, according to historian Carlos Quirino, settled in Malolos, Bulacan, as a Chinese carpenter and artisan. He is remembered for having built a staircase leading from the church to the convent, so that girlfriends may pass unnoticed into the friar's quarters.
Steve Latorre, Ric Manapat and I checked this out, and found a walled-in space at the end of the front balcony, with a wall not aligned with the wall in the next room. And right underneath this wall, is a wooden ceiling lower than the adjoining cement ceiling, over an iron gate separating the church from the convent, right beside the choir loft, where the girls are expected to be. If there was such a staircase built by Cojuangco for priestly assignation, it would be located here.
Steve Latorre, who used to run the Catholic seminary near Malolos, tells of the street named Sto. Nińo, also known as Calle de las Mestizas, where the elite of the town used to live, full of mestizas whose origins can only be surmised. Here Jose Rizal, Antonio Luna and our other heroes are said to visit, to court the girls and carouse. Malolos must have been an exciting town then.
A walking distance from the Barasoain Church in No. 540 Paseo del Congreso, the town's main street, stands the old mansion of the Cojuangcos, still owned by the family and attended by the Tecla Chichioco (wife of Melecio) side of the family. A young 17-year-old UST student, Jennifer Bantigue, recounts the family gossip. The house was used during the Malolos Convention as an informal meeting place of important delegates. General Antonio Luna used to sleep there. Aha!
Ric Manapat has long contended that Antonio Luna and Ysidra Cojuangco had long been lovers before their last tryst in Paniqui. And that if there was a love affair, it must have occurred in Malolos where the Cojuangcos continued to maintain their old house, far from the prying eyes of their townmates in Paniqui.
Indeed, at the time of Jose's conception, sometime between July and October 1895, the Cojuangcos were still permanently residing in Malolos, having moved to Paniqui in March the following year.
The other candidate Antonio was born according to his Ateneo 1918 Annual in the year 1899. In that entire Annual all graduates listed only the year of their birth, not the month or the date. It is surprising to note that all previous and subsequent Annuals, especially those listing the other brothers, gave the exact date, month and year of the graduates' birth. It is hard to believe that the entire 1918 Annual, like his tombstone in Manila Memorial, would be changed to accommodate the secrecy wanted by one single man.
As a matter of fact, if Antonio were born in Malolos instead of Paniqui, we will never know, because the Birth Registries in eight volumes, supposedly covering the period from October 1775 to 1904, stops at February 1899 before Antonio might have been born. What is most suspicious is that a tag that describes the missing volume was left inside the exhibit, suggesting that the missing volume actually exists but was stolen.
Assume that Antonio was born in the year 1899. He would have been conceived between April 1, 1898 (nine months before January 1, 1899) and March 31, 1899 (nine months before December 31, 1899). His predecessor Juan was born on April 18, 1898 -- which means that if Antonio were born of the same mother, he would not have been conceived anytime between April 1 and May 18, so soon before and after Juan's birth.
The Malolos Congress opened in September 15, 1898, and continued into the next year, well within the period of possibility. The love child of Luna and Ysidra was not probably conceived in the first week of June, 1899, a few days before the general was assassinated, as has always been assumed by those who read Quirino's book.
The love tryst must have occurred in Barasoain during the Malolos Congress. According to Vivencio R. Jose in his book, The Rise and Fall of Antonio Luna, “When the Republic formed the Red Cross Association, Luna requested that it `collect funds with which to give small gifts to the soldiers in the lines.' Moreover he invited the Red Cross Ladies to bring these gifts to the soldiers themselves... Consequently he had the ladies carried by train from San Fernando, Pampanga, to the frontlines.”
Could Ysidra have been one of those ladies, a virgin love-struck by an officer in uniform? Antonio Luna was known to be a romantic figure, who once published a book of poetry called Las Estrellas de Mi Cielo (Stars of my Sky), and who remembers: “The happy young women go running from the gardens because the dance is about to begin. On their bashful looks are sparkles of laughter; they gather their wide skirts of silk with the right hand, showing the small stockinged feet in climbing the stairs of the house to get to the hall.” A very erotic image at the turn of the century.
If indeed it is true that Ysidra and Luna fell passionately in love in Barasoain during the Malolos Congress, then Ysidra must have been already pregnant, or have already given birth to a love child, when Luna brought her the gold from the Ilocos and Central Luzon separately a few days before he died. And he would have probably assured her that he would soon marry her and make a respectable woman out of her. The gold might have served as assurance and insurance.
Moreover, while the Cojuangcos have been indifferent students, very few of them earning the highest scholastic honors in the schools they attended, the Lunas are a family of geniuses and achievers. Antonio's brother Manuel was a violinist and conductor. Jose was a doctor of medicine. Juan was a painter famous in Spain and all Europe. And Antonio Luna himself had excellent grades and was a pharmacist with a medico-legal practice of analyzing blood samples, won a science-literary contest, and was an expert in the use of the gun and the saber. The love child of Ysidra and Luna would inherit the genius of Luna, and still remain a Cojuangco.
We contend that the most likely candidate to be the love child of Luna is Antonio, the father of Ramon and grandfather of Tonyboy of the PLDT, for many compelling reasons.
First is the name Antonio, common to both father and son, and passed on to grandson Antonio Cojuangco Jr. who was killed by the Japanese with his parents, and to the great grandson Antonio Cojuangco III, the president of PLDT.
Second is that Antonio Luna was a pharmacist and medical technician, and Antonio Cojuangco was a doctor of medicine, with a natural desire to be in the same field as his father. All the other Cojuangco brothers -- Jose, Juan and Eduardo -- either took up law or business.
Third is the secret and almost conspiratorial way that his birthdate is being withheld from the public.
Fourth is that the descendants of Antonio Cojuangco the elder, unlike his brothers and their families, are excellent scholastic achievers like the Lunas. Antonio's son Ramon graduated from Fordham University with a business degree, cum laude; and Ramon's son Tonyboy, PLDT president, graduated summa cum laude with an economics degree in Ateneo.
The common physical features of Antonio Luna and Antonio Cojuangco, as shown by the photos above, cannot all happen in a million years, unless they have the same genes:
Fifth, to continue our enumeration, the hairlines of Juan and Jose are neat and straight across the forehead, while those of two Antonios form a V at the parting of the hair at the “hati” -- a sort of reverse widow's peak.
Sixth, the two Antonios have the same pout on the lower lip.
Seventh, they have bushy eyebrows on their right side, and less pronounced pencil-thin eyebrows on their left side.
Eighth, their right eyes are round and almond-shaped; and the left eyes are small, slant and located LOWER than those on the right.
Ninth, whose is the OTHER body buried with Antonio Cojuangco? If as we will find later, Antonio Luna’s body has disappeared from the face of the earth, and is neither in Batac where he was born, or in Cabanatuan where he was assassinated, then is it possible that the other body buried with Antonio Cojuangco, is that of his father Antonio Luna?? Easy to tell. DNA samples are available from present live members of the Luna family, and the same is available from the descendants of Antonio Luna. Blood will tell, and if the DNA element in the bones of both Antonio Luna and Antonio Cojuangco be compared, the final proof of their common genes may be verified.
Congratulations are in order for Tonyboy and his family. And we rest our case.

This post has been edited by trismegistos: Mar 11 2010, 08:04 AM
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trismegistos
post Mar 11 2010, 01:16 AM
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The Love Story of Ysidra and Antonio Luna - Part Four: The Road of Destiny

http://www.philippinefolio.com/contdetail....p;id_app3=00369


It was the road of destiny for President Aguinaldo, from Kawit to the gates of Manila, where he was betrayed by Americans into inactivity while awaiting the arrival of its troops from the United States, then north of Manila pursued by superior American forces to Cabanatuan, to Palanan and defeat.
El Camino Real was also the road of destiny for the starcrossed lovers, Ysidra Cojuangco and General Antonio Luna, leading from Barasoain during the Malolos Congress when love first bloomed, to Paniqui where they spent their last night together, to Cabanatuan where Luna was assassinated, hacked with bolos and perforated with bullets. The hub of El Camino Real is Manila, and there on Taft Avenue in the La Salle College, two other Antonios, both Cojuangco, died violently, shot and bayoneted along with their families by retreating Japanese invaders.
We traveled the road of destiny, on Good Friday to Kawit, to Heroes Hill, Ayala Alabang, Manila Memorial Park; and recently for the last leg of our trail in quest of the Holy Grail, to Malolos, Paniqui and Cabanatuan.
We dropped by the Archbishop of Tarlac Florentino F. Cinense who requested the Parish Priest of Paniqui Pedro Capitly to open to us old Baptismal Registries that dated back to 1869. Our worst fears were confirmed, the Books No. 13 and 14 covering the period from 1874 to 1902 were missing. We were hoping to find the baptismal record of Ysidra's natural son allegedly with a Chinese mestizo, or a record of its death and burial; and/or the baptismal record of Antonio Cojuangco, which would at least state the age of the baby (in days) at the time of baptism. Alas, as in the Barasoain Church records, as in the Ateneo Annual of 1918, as on his tombstone in Manila Memorial, as now in the Paniqui church records, evidence of Antonio Cojuangco's birth is missing. Incredible!
We were told that some information might be available at the old ancestral estate of Dońa Ysidra in Paniqui itself, now occupied by ex presidential candidate Danding Cojuangco. Ric Manapat, Steve Latorre and myself, all involved in the campaign against Danding, opted to send a team of researchers from UP, led by an Ateneo graduate student, named Emmanuel, literally “sent by God.” A student of para-psychology under Father Jimmy Bulatao, he joined us upon the prompting of his divining rod.
After being questioned at length, Emmanuel and his team gained the confidence of the old family retainers who showed them a portrait and bust of the venerable Dońa Ysidra Cojuangco, a statue of the clan founder Don Martin who migrated here from China. Also the old house, now called Y.C. Building, near the railroad terminal that once brought General Arthur MacArthur to the Cojuangcos, and from which Cojuangco rice was transported by military trains free to Manila, courtesy of MacArthur.
Emmanuel was also regaled with eerie ghost stories, of a troubled soul that knock on doors, peruse books and papers, and wander around various parts of the house. But it was when he and his team were brought to the old mausoleum called Ermita, that Emmanuel began to feel the presence of something not of this world, not unlike that in the movie Wuthering Heights (from a novel by Emily Bronte) after Cathy died and her spirit haunted Heathcliff in the barren windswept moors. In the white heat of summer and dark brooding interiors of the family chapel, Emmanuel sweated under a strange spell.
Plaques behind the altar listed each deceased family member, including two foetuses that were born dead, but there was no evidence of Ysidra's love child who supposedly died in infancy. Antonio Cojuangco and his son Antonio Jr. and those who died with them, were listed as having been killed on February 12, 1944 -- wrong day and wrong year!. The mystery of the wrong dates deepen. Outside, at the back of the chapel in an obscure corner where it lay unattended and weathered for the last ten years, was another marker probably intended to replace the marker with the wrong date.
This marker said, “Dr. Antonio C. Cojuangco, + FEB. 13, 1945 A LA EDAD DE 45 AŃOS... “ At last another clue to Antonio's birth! If he was anywhere between 45 years of age to 45 years and eleven months when he died, he must have been born between March 1899 and February 12, 1900. But his Ateneo Annual says he was born in the year 1899; therefore we revise our estimate of his birth to between March 1899 to December 1899, in which case Antonio was conceived nine months before, between June 1898 and March 1899...this is consistent with our previous estimates, well within the time Luna was attending the Malolos Congress and fighting a war.
The love story of Ysidra Cojuangco and Antonio Luna is a story told within the Cojuangco family itself, especially from the side of Tecla Chichioco, Ysidra's sister-in-law and the alleged mother of Antonio Cojuangco. Wouldn't Tecla's relatives at the time notice that Tecla was not at all pregnant before she allegedly gave birth to Antonio??
The oral history came from other sources: the family of Eulalio Saulo who brought the gold of Luna from the Ilocos to Ysidra, especially Encarnacion Saulo-Padilla, who was a friend of Ysidra herself; the family of Tiburcio Hilario who also escorted the gold of Luna from Pampanga to Ysidra; from the leaders of the revolution exiled in Guam (Artemio Ricarte, Apolinario Mabini) who told their fellow exile Pedro Abad Santos who then told his fellow socialist Luis Taruc; Archbishop Florentino Cinense (who speaks Pangalatok) listening to gossip in his own hometown of Cabanatuan.
Emmanuel the para-psychologist was fascinated by the fact that while his other brothers stayed close to the Paniqui hacienda, Antonio, like Luna the cosmopolite, was attracted to the city where he lived on Taft Avenue in Pasay, and was always addressed as Doctor, never Don like the others. He was fascinated by the temperament of Ramon and his son Tonyboy, and that of the legendary Luna, quoting Morgan & King saying that temperament is indeed an inheritable trait.
On our way out of Paniqui, a fleet of cars with screaming sirens met us along the highway. Emmanuel panicked, saying that he is too young to die, not having tasted the joys of marriage. Suddenly with the thought that the fleet of cars may turn back to pursue us, we directed our car out of the road going south to Manila, to the road going east to Cabanatuan where Antonio Luna was assassinated. It was as if some strange spell had fallen over Emmanuel and the rest of us, compelling us almost against our will to the road of Luna's destiny, to Cabanatuan where he spent his last day on earth.
Rushing down the stairs and seething with uncontrollable rage, Antonio Luna was met by Captain Pedro Janolina, who hacked him with a bolo on the temple above the ear. The Kawit presidential guards joined in, firing and slashing at the hapless General, who pulled out his gun and retreated to the streets, bleeding profusely from 30 mortal wounds, and he died, muttering, “Cowards! Assassins!” For an hour his body lay at the plaza under the withering afternoon sun. Then for no reason, soldiers hacked Luna's body with sadistic glee, wrapped him in a tattered mat and brought him inside the church, where a doctor noted that his intestines were falling out of his undershirt. Darkness and bats swooped down to keep him company.
We traced the steps Antonio took in his rendezvous with death. We noted that place where he died, by the side of the church. We asked where his body is buried, and officials said the body was brought back to his home town in Batac in Ilocos Norte. We inquired later from the officials of Batac and were told that the body was buried in Cabanatuan where he was killed. If the body is neither in Cabanatuan, nor in Batac, where is it?? Mr. Pedro Ukong, researcher at the data bank of the National Historical Commission, tells us that there is no record of where General Antonio Luna was buried, and the pertinent documents relating to the relationship of Antonio Luna and Ysidra Cojuangco are missing from the archives. Is it possible that his body was retrieved by his sweetheart Ysidra Cojuangco, and buried with his love child, Antonio C. Cojuangco, who was among those massacred by the Japanese troops in La Salle during the Battle of Manila?? Is it possible that the extra skeleton in the coffin of Antonio C. Cojuangco is not that of his Chinese amah as claimed, but that of his own father? A DNA test of the two skeletons would ferret out the truth and lay this matter to rest. Antonio C. Cojuangco himself died a horrendous death along with his family during the World War II.
Antonio Cojuangco and his family sought refuge in La Salle College trying to dodge American bombs randomly dropped on Manila, when suddenly the Japanese soldiers went on a shooting and bayoneting rampage. He died bleeding of multiple wounds, as did his wife Victoria, his son Antonio Jr., daughter Trinidad, and daughter-in-law Nene de las Alas, the bride of 18 months of survivor Ramon Cojuangco who found himself on that tragic day, a widower, an orphan, and a surrogate father to sister Lourdes.
We all ended up in the deepening dusk on the street where Luna was killed, and on the plaza where he lay dead, hacked and butchered, and we thought of his tragic love Ysidra, and the rivers of blood that flowed from the two other Antonios sprawled in the corridors of La Salle.
It was then that Emmanuel murmured, “Peace be with you, Antonio Luna, you restless tormented soul. You are no longer dead. Your noble blood lives on in the veins of another man, another Antonio.”
Again congratulations, Tonyboy Luna.
(SMART FILE, issue 014 & 015, April, 1994, with data added February 16, 1998)
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trismegistos
post Mar 11 2010, 01:17 AM
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http://www.philippinefolio.com/contdetail....p;id_app3=01058

QUOTE
From Do'a Ysidra came the Cojuangco fortune



MY wife's uncle Carlos Quirino certainly cut a handsome figure in his dapper uniform, as a Bataan veteran and aide to President Elpidio Quirino (no kin), and the Dream Boy of the women of his time. He was married three times and twice divorced, and the number of women who loved him can only be determined by a national census.

When he married Liesl Commans, she fitted him with a chastity belt, and that was the end of his love life, and the beginning of a career as the most prolific and most respected historian of our time.

He wrote 28 books -- on Rizal, young Aguinaldo, Vicente Madrigal, Earl Carroll, Chick Parsons, Amang Rodriguez -- mostly commissioned and well paid for. A 30 page story of Marites Pineda's rice mill cost her P20,000 and worth it.

Five of Uncle Charlie's books are still unpublished including one on the Ayala Zobel family, and another on the Cojuangcos as commissioned by Danding. It is from the last-mentioned, as well from other sources, that we relate the story of how the massive fortune of Cory's Cojuangco family came into being.

We know nothing about Martin, the first Cojuangco, except for a memorial built by his son Jose in the town of Paniqui which states that during the Manchu Dynasty he was the 19th generation of the Kho family in Hing-chiam, Fukien.

Jose arrived at the age of 13 from Amoy in 1861, sent for by his father, studied in Binondo, moved to Malolos as a contratista in house-building, married Antera Estrella, and sired three children: Ysidra (1867), Melecio (1871), and Trinidad who died early.

Melecio married wealthy Tecla Chichioco, and together with his father Jose who also had a wealthy wife, bought a fleet of carretones for hire to transport goods to Manila.

Melecio sired four sons: Jose Jr. (father of President Cory, Pete and Peping), Juan, Antonio (father of Monching Cojuangco of the PLDT) and Eduardo (father of Danding, PACMAN).

The family moved to Paniqui, Tarlac on March 19, 1896, where they bought 1.33 hectares of rice land for P100 on September 1, 1909; 16.74 hectares. for P500, 3.73 hectares. for P200 and 11 hectares. for P900 on November 10, 1901; 8 hectares for P880.35 and 2 hectares for P119.65 on November 17, 1901.

During the Philippine American War, General Arthur MacArthur, chasing Aguinaldo to Ilocos and Palanan, knocked at the door of Don Melecio and asked to be quartered. Melecio welcomed him as a guest and offered his capacious warehouses for the storing of US army supplies.

To reciprocate, General MacArthur gave orders that the Cojuangco family could use free of charge the train to bring their rice to Manila, since the train went back empty after bringing the army supplies to Paniqui. With freight cost of P2.50 a sack saved, the Cojuangcos profited immensely by being nice to an enemy officer.

Cory's father Jose and Douglas MacArthur, both young boys then, had almost a scuffle over a bicycle, not speaking each other’s language -- an incident they laughed about in later years.

How did the Cojuangcos suddenly come upon their large fortune during those tumultuous years of the Philippine American War?

One story was that when Aguinaldo fled from Malolos, he entrusted a sizeable sum of money in gold and silver to Melecio Cojuangco to be brought up north. But the US army caught up with Melecio who threw the treasure into a deep well. After the war, Cojuangco returned, retrieved the money, and with no one to give it to, kept it for himself. Captain Taylor, in his “The Philippine Insurgent Records,”' said that P27,000 of the rebel's money was never accounted for.

Another story is that Gen. Antonio Luna, as chief of staff of the revolutionary army, had collected a sizeable sum from contributions with which to pay his soldiers. The person who collected for him was Tiburcio Hilario, Pampanga governor. Hilario's granddaughter, Ambassador Rafaelita Hilario Soriano, relates that her grandfather kept the gold and silver in sacks, including gold plates, chalices and other church treasures taken from Bacolor, San Fernando and Guagua.

After losing an encounter at Sto. Tomas, Pampanga, Luna ordered Hilario to bring the valuables to Tarlac, where the revolutionary government planned to establish its capital.

General Luna, so the story goes, then turned over the treasure to Ysidra Cojuangco, Melecio’s sister then an attractive 32 year old woman, for safe-keeping. The Luna proceed to Cabanatuan to meet with Aguinaldo, and was assassinated.

Why did the Ilocano general entrust Ysidra with the treasure? Rumors had it that she was his sweetheart and lover, and trusted her to keep the treasure till he returned.

Ysidra Cojuangco bore a child out of wedlock, and it was suspected that General Antonio Luna was the father. But the family insists that Ysidra fell in love with an unnamed Chinese mestizo who died before they could be married.

Melecio was elected to the first Philippine Assembly, and died after an altercation with some bully-boy Americans on the train to Paniqui.

With the death of the father Don Jose, Ysidra the spinster became the head of the family. The Cojuangco family owned some 12,000 hectares, controlled the rice trade of the province and lent so much money to planters and businessmen of Tarlac, Pangasinan and Nueva Ecija that Justice Antonio G. Lucero, the family lawyer thought she practically owned Central Luzon.

Ysidra was 93 when she died in the Makati Medical Center on July 13, 1960. She died intestate, and her four nephews, among them Cory's papa and those of Danding and Monching, inherited equally her belongings.

In one trunk, they found IOU's of laborers and the poor, totaling P2 million -- which was written off as the last charitable act of their aunt.

The uncles also found a trunk full of Japanese Occupation money, which Ysidra thought might be validated after the war. It was the only mistake she ever made as a businesswoman.

December 1, 1987, Philippines Daily Inquirer


This post has been edited by trismegistos: Mar 11 2010, 08:02 AM
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trismegistos
post Mar 11 2010, 08:12 AM
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http://raulcibanez.blogspot.com/2009/10/co...ine-family.html

A 9-part series on how the elders of presidentiable-cousins Gibo and Noynoy ended up on opposite sides of the political fence

With the specter of second cousins Gilberto Cojuangco Teodoro (of Lakas-Kampi-CMD) and Benigno Cojuangco Aquino III (of the Liberal Party) running against each other in the 2010 presidential elections, many people are curious how the clan where they belong got split and brought them on different sides of the political fence.

The story is captured in “Family Feud,” the second chapter of the book Boss Danding, the tycoon’s unauthorized biography, by Earl G. Parreño. With his permission, Newsbreak is serializing that chapter.

(First of 9 parts) Marrying business and politics, Cojuangco style Posted by Earl G. Parreño in Newsbreak 21 September 09 http://bit.ly/17nyT0

Danding’s grandfather, Melecio, had married a Spanish-Chinese mestiza, Tecla Chichioco of Malolos, Bulacan, and was educated at two top universities then, the San Juan de Letran and the University of Santo Tomas. An educator by training, he however spent most of his time helping his family run a booming rice trading and milling business and aggressively expanding their landholdings. Their success in business brought the Cojuangcos prestige and prominence in the community. Thus, when the first general elections was held in the country in 1907, Melecio ran for the National Assembly, the legislative body during the American colonial rule, to represent one of the two legislative districts of Tarlac. Melecio won.

Melecio’s stint in politics was cut short when he suffered and died of a heart attack on March 13, 1909. He served just over a year as legislator. But his sons would later follow in his footsteps. Together with their Aunt Ysidra, Melecio’s elder sister, they established the Paniqui Sugar Mills in 1928 to produce sugar both for the domestic and export markets, and alcoholic drinks using molasses from the mills as feedstock.

Ysidra and the four brothers also ventured into stockbroking by establishing the Finance and Mining Investments Corp. in the early 1930s, in partnership with the Jacinto and Rufino families, the Cojuangcos’ close friends. In 1938, the three families set up the Philippine Bank of Commerce, the first bank in the country to be wholly owned by Filipinos.

Ysidra and the four brothers were determined to make money work for them. They gave out loans to townsfolk for expenses in fiestas, litigation, gambling losses and other reasons, with rice lands as collateral. Many of the borrowers were not able to pay back the loans, so the Cojuangcos’ landholdings expanded by leaps and bounds. By the 1930s, they were considered the biggest land-owning clan in the whole of Central Luzon with tens of thousands of hectares to their name.

By the time Danding was born, the Cojuangcos had already become one of the richest and most prominent families not only in Tarlac, or even in Central Luzon, but in the whole country. Politicians running for national positions would seek financial as well as political support from them. Manual L. Quezon, who would become President of the Commonwealth government, had personally asked the Cojuangcos in 1934 to let one of the brothers run for representative of the National Assembly under his party.

Read the full post:
http://newsbreak.com.ph/index.php?option=c...Itemid=88889066

Going up the social ladder (Second of 9 parts) Posted by Earl G. Parreño in Newsbreak on 22 September 09 http://bit.ly/4bNvO1

Like most Chinese immigrants, the older Cojuangcos knew the benefits of acquiring a powerful and wealthy patron

The Cojuangcos of the 1930s had gone a long way since their ancestors arrived in Manila some 150 years earlier, in the latter part of the 1700s, from Fujian (Fukien), a province in the southeastern coast of what is now the People’s Republic of China. Long before the Spaniards came to colonize the Philippines in the mid-1500s, the Chinese had been trading with the native inhabitants of the islands and some had decided to settle in the country.

Read the full post:
http://newsbreak.com.ph/index.php?option=c...Itemid=88889066

Riding on Paniqui’s progress (Third of 9 parts) Posted by Earl G. Parreño in Newsbreak on 23 September 2009 http://bit.ly/kKqvc


Going to Tarlac to hide a pregnant, unwed daughter, the Cojuangcos also discovered the place’s bright economic prospects

The year 1896 was a year of upheaval. It was the year that the Kataas-taasan, Kagalang-galangang Katipunan ng mga Anak ng Bayan or KKK (Highest and Most Respected Association of the Sons of the Nation), the Philippine revolutionary movement seeking independence from Spain, openly declared war against the colonizers. It was also the year that the Spanish conquerors, realizing that they were losing control over the archipelago, launched the most massive repression campaign, arresting everyone they suspected of having ties with the Katipunan, and torturing and executing them. Before the year ended, thousands of Filipinos, both native inhabitants and mestizos, had been tortured and killed, the most celebrated of whom was Dr. Jose Rizal who was publicly executed.

Read the full post:
http://newsbreak.com.ph/index.php?option=c...Itemid=88889066

Where did the Cojuangcos’ wealth really come from? (Fourth of 9 parts) Posted by Earl G. Parreño in Newsbreak on 25 September 2009 http://bit.ly/dN5SP

Neighbors didn’t believe the family made it all from rice milling, trading, and money lending

At the turn of the century, with the Spanish forces decisively defeated by the Filipino revolutionaries, the first Philippine Republic was established. In ceremonies held at the Barasoain Church in Malolos, Bulacan, on January 23, 1899, General Emilio Aguinaldo was proclaimed president of the republic and the Constitution was approved. Unfortunately, the republic did not live long as the Americans colonized the nation and crushed the republic in a bloody war that lasted until 1902.

Read the full post:

http://newsbreak.com.ph/index.php?option=c...Itemid=88889066

Brothers, business partners (Fifth of 9 parts) Posted by Earl G. Parreño in Newsbreak on 28 September 09 http://bit.ly/ofTH

How the Cojuangcos jointly expanded their interests before World War II

From the beginning, things had been a lot easier for Melecio’s children than they were for Melecio and his sisters. Early in their childhood, the Cojuangco family had already made lots of money and had, in fact, become socially prominent. Their father and grandfather had met and known many influential people, a number of them of national stature. And they, too, had become the kind of people who would get invited to be baptismal or wedding sponsors. They were already in a position to play the role of patrons.

Read the full post:
http://newsbreak.com.ph/index.php?option=c...Itemid=88889066

Wealth and misfortunes during the war (Sixth of 9 parts) Posted by Earl G. Parreño in Newsbreak on 29 September 09 http://bit.ly/pdSxY

How the Cojuangcos survived the Japanese occupation

For the Cojuangco brothers, the war years provided a time for taking full control of their respective families and to reflect on their individual abilities to manage their own affairs. Japan’s war plan involved the neutralization of the United States Pacific Fleet based at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii and the seizure of southeast Asian countries including Thailand, Indonesia, French Indo-China (Vietnam, Laos, Cambodia), Singapore, Malaya and the Philippines.

Read the full post:
http://newsbreak.com.ph/index.php?option=c...Itemid=88889066

Noynoy’s grandpa couldn’t lead the clan Posted by Earl G. Parreño in Newsbreak 30 September 2009 (Seventh of 9 parts) http://bit.ly/4vxNx

Without a family anchor, the succeeding generations of Cojuangcos engaged in business maneuverings, sometimes even against each other

The Cojuangco brothers came home from the war with a feeling of unease not only towards the future but also towards one other. The war had claimed one of them; they are no longer the four brothers that people had known before. The death of Antonio had removed one of the pillars of the family’s third generation. The survivors grieved over his passing.

Read the full post:
http://newsbreak.com.ph/index.php?option=c...Itemid=88889150

Ninoy’s dirty tricks made Peping win over Danding (Eighth of 9 parts) Posted by Earl G. Parreño in Newsbreak on 01 October 09 http://bit.ly/1NemWW

First ever electoral face-off between Cojuangco cousins, in 1965, was both dirty and expensive

It was not surprising that the Cojuangco clan’s rivalry in business would eventually spill over to politics. And it would be the clan’s fourth and fifth generations that would be pitted against each other in the political arena.

Read the full post:
http://newsbreak.com.ph/index.php?option=c...Itemid=88889066

Danding builds an empire. (Conclusion: Ninth of 9 parts) Posted by Earl G. Parreño in Newsbreak on 02 October 09 http://bit.ly/2WV2hT

Gibo’s uncle expands the family’s political clout beyond Tarlac

Danding married Maria Soledad “Gretchen” Cuyugan Oppen on November 22, 1956, a few months after returning from his studies in the US. Gretchen is an heiress of the Montilla family of Bacolod, one of the biggest landowners in Negros Occidental. Danding and Gretchen have four children - two boys and two girls.

Read the full post:
http://newsbreak.com.ph/index.php?option=c...Itemid=88889150

Posted by Raúl Ibáñez at 10:57 AM

This post has been edited by trismegistos: Mar 11 2010, 08:36 AM
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jbsauloiii
post Mar 26 2010, 09:45 PM
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paglilinaw lang po: hindi po anak ng Don Eulalio G. SAULO (unang Presidente Municipal ng Sta Rosa, N.E.) si Gng. Encarnacion Oltiveros SAULO-Padilla, sapagkat ditche po ng aking lolo Julio OLTIVEROS-SAULO ang lola Cion at sila po ay ANAK ng Martin Ygnacio SAULO (at Marcela Oltiveros, ngunit sya'y yumao ng maaga kaya't naiwan sa pangangalaga ng Don Eulalio (na kanyang ama) ang kanyang talong anak: Marta, Encarnacion at Julio (Sr). Ako po nama'y anak ng Julio Santos-SAULO, Jr; Julio Baking Saulo, lll po ang aking buong pangalan. Lolo (grand-uncles ko pong pareho ang Don Alfredo Bumanlag Saulo at Angel Baking... salamat po.

This post has been edited by jbsauloiii: Mar 26 2010, 10:14 PM
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trismegistos
post Mar 30 2010, 08:22 AM
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^^^
Thanks for the corrections. I wish the one who did this research, Ric Manapat and Larry Henares are reading this.
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Ek-ek
post May 1 2010, 04:28 PM
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Do you think even if Manny Villar won the election corruption in the Philippines will be eradicated?????
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