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traditional filipino house of ancient times
washyourhands
post Sep 15 2010, 11:01 AM
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benteunerz36
post Sep 15 2010, 11:07 PM
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WOW! awesome! biggrin.gif
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silangan
post Sep 16 2010, 03:51 PM
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Depends which part of the Philippines.
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martin_nuke
post Sep 16 2010, 04:40 PM
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Actually that house has Indonesian architecture so it must me Indonesian inspired.



http://www.indonesia-travel-guide.com/Jaka...ness_House.html

This is a more traditional Filipino house.


This post has been edited by martin_nuke: Sep 16 2010, 04:43 PM
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silangan
post Sep 16 2010, 08:29 PM
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QUOTE (martin_nuke @ Sep 16 2010, 05:40 PM) *
Actually that house has Indonesian architecture so it must me Indonesian inspired.



http://www.indonesia-travel-guide.com/Jaka...ness_House.html

This is a more traditional Filipino house.


Coconut lumber in traditional Filipino house?

Traditional Filipinos don't cut the wood longitudinally to make boards for walls. They line numerous round timber together and tie them with rattan to make walls. In other regions where Kawayan (bamboo) are plentiful, they use them in place for thin round timber to make walls.

The posts, beams and girders are round and carved/chiseled along the area where they meet other timber as in joints which are augered and inserted with a wood lock and tied with rattan. Floors are made of Kawayan or thin round timber planed flat on one side.

Roofing is made of Kugon or Nipa depending upon the location, whether coastal or inland or mountainous.

When did Filipinos start using coconut lumber for housing? Does anyone here realize how difficult it is to cut coconut tree LONGITUDINALLY
with all its coarse grain?.... The answer is when CHAINSAWS like STIHL became popular household tool in the late '80's.

So is coconut lumber part of the Filipino traditional house? I don't think so.

Filipinos of ancient time don't use large diameter trees like coconut to make a house. They use the thinner various hardwoods that grow in the forest.

Reaching for sunlight, these various hardwoods grow very tall and straight sandwiched between other trees. Diameters for posts don't exceed eight inches.

Four and six inches were very common diameter for posts. Some coastal dweller Filipinos have multiple posts that run as much as 20 posts in one small house or even more. This protects the house from waves.

Ivatans have their own traditional houses and Igorots make their own designs. But none uses coconut lumber.



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