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Migration into the Philippines
Fil-Am
post Feb 12 2005, 01:54 AM
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Philippine History
25,000 - 30,000 BC: Beyer's Migration Theory. The Aeta (Negrito), a short dark skinned, kinky-haired Pygmy, hailing from Central Asia, traveled to the Philippines by foot by way of the land bridges. The Aeto is purported to have brought to the archipelago skills in the use of the blow-gun and the bow and arrow.

22,000 BC: The approximated date of the remnats of the Tabon Cave Dweller which have been associated with te species knows as the Austroloid.

3,500 - 5,000 BC: Beyer's Migration Theory - The next two groups or waves of people arriving in the Philippines are Indonesian A and B. They are said to have introduced to the islands the home-edged weapons of the stone dager, stone-tipped spear and hand-held shield.

500 BC: Jocano's Theory - During the end of the Incipient Period, about the turn of the Millenium AD, Filipino contacts with the outside world became intensified, the major impetus being a relatively efficient maritime transportation.

200 BC: Beyer's Migration Theory - Three succesive waves of Malays arriving in the Philippines. The first Malays brought metal dagers, swords and spears.

100 BC: Beyer's Migration Theory - The second migratory wave was responsible for introducingthe ancient Visayan Baybayin Alphabet to the Philippines.

3 AD: Origin of the kris; believed to have beencrafted as a Hindu religous weapon with mystical powers.

200 AD: Francisco suggest that Baybayin Alphabet (aka Alibata) was brought to the archipelago by the Hindu Tamil by way of Malaysia around this time.

618 AD: Philippine - chinese contacts intesified during the Tang dynasty and peaked aroud the 14th to 15th centuries. It is believed that the Chinese introduced their fighting arts of kun-tao to the Royal Families as a gesture of good faith to trade relations. The practice of kun-tao has been maintained among the Samal Tausug, where it is known as langka-kuntaw.

977 AD: The Philippine island of Mindoro (known as Mai in Chinese) was known as a place of hospitality to Chinese traders and merchants.

1293 AD: The Srivijaya was succeeded by the Majapahit empire. During this time,Philipine-Indonesian relations intensified, and much of the so-called Indian cultural influences reached the Philippines.

1270 AD: Early evidence of an Islamic presence is furnished by a tombstone of a trader msissionary, in Indanan, Sulu. It bears the inscription "710 AH", using the Islamic dating system,which, in relation to the Christian calendar, approximates to this date.

1250 AD: Beyer's Migration Theory - The third wave of Malays believed to have been headed by the ten Bornean Datus whosettled in Panay. Legends of the 13th Century, as recorded in Maragtas (a written history of Panay) maintain that ten Dyak Datus (Muslim Chieftains) fled their homeland of Borneo - running from the cruel Sultan Makatunaw who had seized their property and ravaged their wives - sttled on Panay Island. The ten datus established the Confederation of Madyaas with Datu Sumakwel as its ruler. Sumakwel ruled this confederation through his Penal Code which was outlined in his book Maragtas. Known as the Maragtas Code, these are the oldest body of Laws believed to have existed in the Philippines.

1450 AD: Through the efforts of the trader, Sharif ul-Hasim Abubakr, Islam took deep roots in Sulu. Abubakr settled in Bwansa where he lived with its king, Rajah Baginda. Here Abubakr converted Baginda to Islam, married his daughter Paramisuli, and established Islam as the official religin of Sulu.
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Suzuka00
post Oct 27 2007, 11:47 AM
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technically the malays came from the philippines ,well filipinos had one autochotonous lang.group called philippine lanuages or tao languages,tao/tau is filipino/maharlikan as viet is kinh .
the tau people spread from orchid island down to north sulawesi and east borneo eliminating malayic and dayak languages from the philippines
then they diversified to ilocano,igorots,kapampangans,bolinaoans,bicolanos and tagalogs,etch groups that went south became bisaya,manobo,tasaday etch..

bicolano and bisayans were malayicized compared to tagalog,since the two former borrowed lots of words from malay such as lawa for the native word gagamba

This post has been edited by Suzuka00: Oct 27 2007, 11:51 AM
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Jc2
post Oct 27 2007, 09:39 PM
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QUOTE(Suzuka00 @ Oct 27 2007, 12:47 PM) [snapback]3288403[/snapback]
technically the malays came from the philippines ,well filipinos had one autochotonous lang.group called philippine lanuages or tao languages,tao/tau is filipino/maharlikan as viet is kinh .
the tau people spread from orchid island down to north sulawesi and east borneo eliminating malayic and dayak languages from the philippines
then they diversified to ilocano,igorots,kapampangans,bolinaoans,bicolanos and tagalogs,etch groups that went south became bisaya,manobo,tasaday etch..

bicolano and bisayans were malayicized compared to tagalog,since the two former borrowed lots of words from malay such as lawa for the native word gagamba


I think the language of the Tao people existed before Malay and Dayak languages emerged

The out of Taiwan theory shows that Malays and Dayaks descended from Taiwanese aborigines that went southward passing through the Philippines and eventually their present homeland
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Suzuka00
post Oct 27 2007, 10:40 PM
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QUOTE(Jc2 @ Oct 27 2007, 09:39 PM) [snapback]3289022[/snapback]
I think the language of the Tao people existed before Malay and Dayak languages emerged

The out of Taiwan theory shows that Malays and Dayaks descended from Taiwanese aborigines that went southward passing through the Philippines and eventually their present homeland

technically malay and ancient tao language look similar but tao language is sister to bornean languages,well it's kinda identical to simplify my explanation
i think it's ilocano-pangasinense that first split then pampangueno-bolinaoan split from the eastern igorots then a group split that went south from eastern igorots they became the manobos and meso-philippine:tagalog,bicolano and bisayans,it explains why some tagalogs live in aurora because it's their homeland.
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Ek-ek
post Oct 28 2007, 09:28 AM
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This is part of the HEKASI subject
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ShambhalistaLVL4
post Mar 26 2009, 01:21 PM
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QUOTE(Fil-Am @ Feb 12 2005, 01:54 AM) [snapback]710323[/snapback]
Philippine History
25,000 - 30,000 BC: Beyer's Migration Theory. The Aeta (Negrito), a short dark skinned, kinky-haired Pygmy, hailing from Central Asia, traveled to the Philippines by foot by way of the land bridges. The Aeto is purported to have brought to the archipelago skills in the use of the blow-gun and the bow and arrow.

22,000 BC: The approximated date of the remnats of the Tabon Cave Dweller which have been associated with te species knows as the Austroloid.

3,500 - 5,000 BC: Beyer's Migration Theory - The next two groups or waves of people arriving in the Philippines are Indonesian A and B. They are said to have introduced to the islands the home-edged weapons of the stone dager, stone-tipped spear and hand-held shield.

500 BC: Jocano's Theory - During the end of the Incipient Period, about the turn of the Millenium AD, Filipino contacts with the outside world became intensified, the major impetus being a relatively efficient maritime transportation.

200 BC: Beyer's Migration Theory - Three succesive waves of Malays arriving in the Philippines. The first Malays brought metal dagers, swords and spears.

100 BC: Beyer's Migration Theory - The second migratory wave was responsible for introducingthe ancient Visayan Baybayin Alphabet to the Philippines.

3 AD: Origin of the kris; believed to have beencrafted as a Hindu religous weapon with mystical powers.

200 AD: Francisco suggest that Baybayin Alphabet (aka Alibata) was brought to the archipelago by the Hindu Tamil by way of Malaysia around this time.

618 AD: Philippine - chinese contacts intesified during the Tang dynasty and peaked aroud the 14th to 15th centuries. It is believed that the Chinese introduced their fighting arts of kun-tao to the Royal Families as a gesture of good faith to trade relations. The practice of kun-tao has been maintained among the Samal Tausug, where it is known as langka-kuntaw.

977 AD: The Philippine island of Mindoro (known as Mai in Chinese) was known as a place of hospitality to Chinese traders and merchants.

1293 AD: The Srivijaya was succeeded by the Majapahit empire. During this time,Philipine-Indonesian relations intensified, and much of the so-called Indian cultural influences reached the Philippines.

1270 AD: Early evidence of an Islamic presence is furnished by a tombstone of a trader msissionary, in Indanan, Sulu. It bears the inscription "710 AH", using the Islamic dating system,which, in relation to the Christian calendar, approximates to this date.

1250 AD: Beyer's Migration Theory - The third wave of Malays believed to have been headed by the ten Bornean Datus whosettled in Panay. Legends of the 13th Century, as recorded in Maragtas (a written history of Panay) maintain that ten Dyak Datus (Muslim Chieftains) fled their homeland of Borneo - running from the cruel Sultan Makatunaw who had seized their property and ravaged their wives - sttled on Panay Island. The ten datus established the Confederation of Madyaas with Datu Sumakwel as its ruler. Sumakwel ruled this confederation through his Penal Code which was outlined in his book Maragtas. Known as the Maragtas Code, these are the oldest body of Laws believed to have existed in the Philippines.

1450 AD: Through the efforts of the trader, Sharif ul-Hasim Abubakr, Islam took deep roots in Sulu. Abubakr settled in Bwansa where he lived with its king, Rajah Baginda. Here Abubakr converted Baginda to Islam, married his daughter Paramisuli, and established Islam as the official religin of Sulu.



yey?
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silangan
post Mar 26 2009, 01:44 PM
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So, where's malakas and maganda?
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salamat
post Mar 26 2009, 02:49 PM
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QUOTE(silangan @ Mar 26 2009, 01:44 PM) [snapback]4177861[/snapback]
So, where's malakas and maganda?


they r over at the garden of eden hanging out with adam and eve embarassedlaugh.gif
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orient
post Mar 28 2009, 02:19 AM
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QUOTE(salamat @ Mar 26 2009, 12:49 PM) [snapback]4177909[/snapback]
they r over at the garden of eden hanging out with adam and eve embarassedlaugh.gif


Swingers laugh.gif
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trismegistos
post Mar 28 2009, 04:27 AM
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Enough of those chitchat.

Going back to the topic

This linguist' Out of Taiwan theory proves that the Philippine isles remain as the single central locus of the migrations throughout Oceania and southeast asia as far as Madagascar and easter island as shown here... http://language.psy.auckland.ac.nz/austron...l2009-large.tif from here http://language.psy.auckland.ac.nz/austronesian/research.php

The problem is more genetic studies that proves Taiwan is not the homeland of the Malayo-Polynesians... http://www.newstatesman.com/blogs/paul-rod...d-spread-taiwan

highlight: Their results show that the biggest migration went not from Taiwan, but to it, and occurred much earlier.

---
Where do we come from? Paul Rodgers charts some of the latest work exploring the movement and development of humans based on DNA and the full mitochondrial genome

Where do we come from? It�s an abiding question, and one that has been only partially answered by science. While little doubt remains that our species evolved in East Africa, details of its spread around the world are still obscure. And the further back we peer, the harder it is to get a clear picture.

What evidence we have falls into three categories: physical remains, such as stone tools and cave paintings, can reveal the movement of technology and culture, but sometimes these spread not just as groups move, but between peoples. Linguistic studies, comparing modern languages to find their common roots, have the same problem. But genetics, looking at how minor mutations have spread through the world�s population, does not.

One of the more intriguing suggestions in the past decade is that the initial spread of humans from Africa extended along the southern coastline of Eurasia, to what is now Southeast Asia, then a subcontinent called Sundaland that was twice the size of modern India, stretching from Burma to Borneo. The flooding of this fertile paradise as the last Ice Age ended forced these people to adapt to new lifestyles, flee to new lands, or become extinct.

DNA research led by Leeds University�s Martin Richards, one of only two professors of archaeogenetics in the world, supports this idea, showing that the stone-age people on the southeastern shore of Sundaland expanded across the newly formed island chains 12,000 years ago.

The new theory, published in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution, is likely to draw bitter criticism from supporters of the old consensus, based on linguistics, that the area is populated today by descendants of a rice-growing people called the Austronesians who expanded from Taiwan just 4,000 years ago. �Some quite forceful archaeologists have been extremely reluctant to accept this,� says Professor Richards. �And I haven�t met a single linguist willing to give up the out-of-Taiwan argument.�

The Austronesians supposedly supplanted the indigenous hunter-gatherers, who first arrived 50,000 years ago yet were considered so insignificant that they have not even been named.

�That was a great mistake,� Professor Richards says. His team is the first to use the full mitochondrial genome rather than fragments, giving it a much more detailed picture of population movements in the distant past. Their results show that the biggest migration went not from Taiwan, but to it, and occurred much earlier.

�The radical explanation is that the linguists are wrong and that these people spread out during the last episode of post-glacial expansion,� he said. The Austronesians may have been like the Normans, a small elite group that arrived later and took control of a larger, indigenous population, he
suggests.

Sundaland was the biggest area to be drowned as the glaciers started to retreat 19,000 years ago, raising sea levels by more than 100 metres. The second largest, Doggerland, now the southern North Sea, was submerged towards the end of the Ice Age, separating the British Isles from continental Europe.

The people living in the southeast Asian subcontinent would have been particularly hard hit by three great sea level surges, 14,000, 11,500 and 7,600 years ago, believed to have been caused by catastrophic events as the ice sheets in North America and Antarctica retreated.

Professor Richards argues that many populations will have been wiped out as their land disappeared beneath the waves.

But one group could have been pre-adapted to the new environment, which had fewer inland plains and meandering riverbanks and twice as much coastline � the people of southeast Sundaland, who may have had a maritime culture linking them to the nearby Wallacean island group, named after the Victorian naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace, which includes New Guinea.

What is certain is that, as sea levels rose, these people began to spread throughout the region, according to mitochondrial mutations, which are passed down from mother to child. A parallel study of stone-age tools by other members of the team supports the theory, showing the spread of a stone tool technology called �flake and blade� throughout the region.

Professor Richards hopes to do further work on the Sundaland population, and is already working on a study of y chromosomes, which are only passed down through the male line. Marine archaeology could also shed more light on the drowned culture, though there are no immediate plans to begin looking beneath the shallow waters of the Sundaland Shelf.

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