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Norway's salmon rot as China takes revenge for dissident's Nob, retribution for Nobel Peace Prize award to Liu Xiaobo
myolinewu
post Oct 6 2011, 02:33 AM
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Norway's salmon rot as China takes revenge for dissident's Nobel Prize

Norway has reported China to the World Trade Organisation (WTO) in an escalation of a row about fish which has pitted one of Europe's smallest countries against the biggest nation in the world.

The Chinese imposed additional import controls on Norwegian salmon last year in apparent retribution for the Nobel Peace Prize awarded in Oslo to the Chinese dissident, Liu Xiaobo. The result has been a collapse in sales of salmon to China, and the sight and smell of North Sea fish rotting in Chinese warehouses. The Norwegian Foreign Office said overall trade with China had grown by 46 per cent over the past six months. But sales of fresh salmon, meanwhile, have collapsed 61.8 per cent.

Officials said they would not speculate as to why Beijing had ignored trade rules relating to Norwegian salmon. But it seems clear that the threat from the Chinese embassy in Oslo last year, of "damage" to diplomatic ties should the Nobel Prize be handed to "a criminal" has focused on a narrow, iconic target.
The Foreign Office said it was in talks with the WTO about how to proceed against China. "Norway believes the measures put in place by China are in conflict with international trade rules, and we have raised the issue in the WTO," said a spokesman. "We are now in a dialogue with Chinese authorities to resolve the issue, and we will continue to monitor the situation."

The row began last year when the Norwegian fisheries minister, Lisbeth Berg-Hansen, was snubbed when she went to visit China in the days following the Nobel prize-giving ceremony. The Foreign Office has pledged to try to solve the issue.

This should have been the year that Norway cashed in on the burgeoning Chinese middle class's new-found love of Japanese-style raw fish. A government sponsored lobby group, Seafood Norway, even forecast a sales increase of as much as 40 per cent. The group's director, Christian Chraner, said his members had invested heavily in their supply chains in order to make sure their produce would reach China in a fresh state. But the new veterinary controls imposed by Beijing meant the fish rotted before they could be moved on to retailers or restaurants.

"They have invested in long-term contracts, manpower and operations. It takes time to build that new type of structure and that investment should now be paying returns," he said. "The fish is going into the country as fresh fish, but it is waiting for such a long time in warehouses that it is going bad."

He said China's new rules were also being applied selectively, effectively punishing Norwegian fish exporters.

Marine Harvest, a vast Norwegian salmon farmer with operations worldwide, has switched to exporting Scottish salmon with no problems.

Russia and France are Norway's largest export markets. Last year, China represented only 1.66 per cent of Norwegian salmon exports, but farmers see it as a potential boom market.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/eu...ze-2366167.html
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chutzpah
post Oct 6 2011, 07:17 AM
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Serve them right! Let the salmon rot away!
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zoopiter
post Oct 6 2011, 09:01 AM
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QUOTE (chutzpah @ Oct 6 2011, 08:17 PM) *
Serve them right! Let the salmon rot away!


but going with underhand methods are bad.
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phop
post Oct 6 2011, 12:32 PM
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QUOTE (zoopiter @ Oct 6 2011, 10:01 AM) *
but going with underhand methods are bad.

As if the Americans and the West itself doesn't use such methods. The west always preach about how china should follow its methods of doing things, well guess what? HERE YOU HAVE IT DUMBASS!!!!! We are following exactly that...
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Mauser
post Oct 6 2011, 05:48 PM
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Norway could think of it like sanctions. A taste of their own medicine.
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zoopiter
post Oct 6 2011, 07:06 PM
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QUOTE (phop @ Oct 7 2011, 01:32 AM) *
As if the Americans and the West itself doesn't use such methods. The west always preach about how china should follow its methods of doing things, well guess what? HERE YOU HAVE IT DUMBASS!!!!! We are following exactly that...


i never say others does not have such methods. as long as it occurs, all parties should be equally condemned at all times.

i would not agree at all on your last statement though. do you know that the japanese imperial expansion is partially modeled after the colonial expansion the european powers had earlier on? the japanese feel that they had the strength and potential to catch up on the colonial race, and that they had been better than the other asian countries, so that gives them the rights to rule over the rest. some of them feel that since the west had done so, they are just following that and therefore even after the war, some feel that they did nothing wrong in invading china. the apathy of some chinese towards the mistakes of the past is quite worrisome to me.

besides, would you like to find out examples of china giving out peace prize to overseas dissendents and other countries retaliated by violation of trade practices? as you said, exactly that, cos i can't think of exact comparisons, but i'm sure if u dig hard enough, u might find one.

This post has been edited by zoopiter: Oct 6 2011, 07:17 PM
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UnZipped
post Oct 7 2011, 07:34 AM
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well, i hope the poor Norwegians learnt something from this. It's nevahhh good to cross china.

This post has been edited by UnZipped: Oct 7 2011, 07:36 AM
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sewoth
post Oct 7 2011, 06:36 PM
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QUOTE (myolinewu @ Oct 6 2011, 02:33 AM) *
Norway's salmon rot as China takes revenge for dissident's Nobel Prize

Norway has reported China to the World Trade Organisation (WTO) in an escalation of a row about fish which has pitted one of Europe's smallest countries against the biggest nation in the world.

The Chinese imposed additional import controls on Norwegian salmon last year in apparent retribution for the Nobel Peace Prize awarded in Oslo to the Chinese dissident, Liu Xiaobo. The result has been a collapse in sales of salmon to China, and the sight and smell of North Sea fish rotting in Chinese warehouses. The Norwegian Foreign Office said overall trade with China had grown by 46 per cent over the past six months. But sales of fresh salmon, meanwhile, have collapsed 61.8 per cent.

Officials said they would not speculate as to why Beijing had ignored trade rules relating to Norwegian salmon. But it seems clear that the threat from the Chinese embassy in Oslo last year, of "damage" to diplomatic ties should the Nobel Prize be handed to "a criminal" has focused on a narrow, iconic target.
The Foreign Office said it was in talks with the WTO about how to proceed against China. "Norway believes the measures put in place by China are in conflict with international trade rules, and we have raised the issue in the WTO," said a spokesman. "We are now in a dialogue with Chinese authorities to resolve the issue, and we will continue to monitor the situation."

This should have been the year that Norway cashed in on the burgeoning Chinese middle class's new-found love of Japanese-style raw fish. A government sponsored lobby group, Seafood Norway, even forecast a sales increase of as much as 40 per cent. The group's director, Christian Chraner, said his members had invested heavily in their supply chains in order to make sure their produce would reach China in a fresh state. But the new veterinary controls imposed by Beijing meant the fish rotted before they could be moved on to retailers or restaurants.

"They have invested in long-term contracts, manpower and operations. It takes time to build that new type of structure and that investment should now be paying returns," he said. "The fish is going into the country as fresh fish, but it is waiting for such a long time in warehouses that it is going bad."

He said China's new rules were also being applied selectively, effectively punishing Norwegian fish exporters.

Marine Harvest, a vast Norwegian salmon farmer with operations worldwide, has switched to exporting Scottish salmon with no problems.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/eu...ze-2366167.html


Actually this just sounds very much like typical OVER-ASSOCIATION that western media do all the time. No evidence at all in this article that China imposed this fish export ban only on Norwegian fishes. Why doesn't the article reveal which rule/law is it that Norway actually are being targeted? The only thing in this article that can be construed as evidence is an anecdote that a certain farmer (JUST ONE) in Norway has more success exporting Scottish salmon than Norwegian salmon, but even then the details are skipped over. For example, how easy or what do you mean by no problems. What did that guy exactly say?

QUOTE
The row began last year when the Norwegian fisheries minister, Lisbeth Berg-Hansen, was snubbed when she went to visit China in the days following the Nobel prize-giving ceremony. The Foreign Office has pledged to try to solve the issue.


See this is non-evidence. Of course all Norwegian officials are going to snubbed when that diplomatic row was going on. Prove that it was only the fishery minister was snubbed and only then does that help its case that China is taking revenge through salmon export.

This is probably just a regular reform of food laws in China to improve food safety. And people found special association that can be drawn in this case. Not every Chinese legislator has the leisure or time to think "oh no, what would the foreigner think? would they interpret this wrongly? blah blah blah..." on every law they make.

Also, I can care less if Norway's fish rot or not, but as you can see even on this very pro-China forum, people immediately falls into the western media's trap and takes it into assumption what their lying journalists are saying. Also, I am pretty sure the $hitty western journalist meant to use this to show that China (note the sweeping association, not just the government) is petty, so I am not sure this kind of thing that they allege China do is anything to be proud of.

Edit:
I haven't seen this line the first time.
QUOTE
Russia and France are Norway's largest export markets. Last year, China represented only 1.66 per cent of Norwegian salmon exports, but farmers see it as a potential boom market.

Even more evidence that Norway are not even being specially targeted. The amount of exports is TINY, even for norway, so fluctuations are more than expected and the effects on Norway are more than small. There is no possible way that China has the time to make a law specially to block a tiny portion of Norway's market, but in every other area, allow the other export to grow, ie note that Norwegian-Chinese trade grew forty-fu-king-six percent !!!

All in all, western journalists like the one who wrote this is a piece of $hit.


This post has been edited by sewoth: Oct 7 2011, 06:42 PM
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