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thanks ejay
Fictionicon
post Jan 13 2012, 08:25 PM
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amaya was the best show and the only filipino show i ever watched... too bad their last episode was today


their final show even had a good message

http://www.phnoy.com/2012/01/amaya-january...le-episode.html
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silangan
post Jan 14 2012, 01:23 AM
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Is this supposed to be Pre-Spanish Philippines? Why are the women have so aggressive roles?

I've never seen it anyway, but this sample here is terrible.

Only the attire and the names are ancient. The way the performers conduct themselves is just like NOW.

Our parents behaved differently than us. Our grandparents also behaved differently than our parents......ans so on and so fort.

These actors and actresses here are behaving like it's year 2011.





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post Jan 14 2012, 02:37 AM
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QUOTE (silangan @ Jan 14 2012, 01:23 AM) *
Is this supposed to be Pre-Spanish Philippines? Why are the women have so aggressive roles?

I've never seen it anyway, but this sample here is terrible.

Only the attire and the names are ancient. The way the performers conduct themselves is just like NOW.

Our parents behaved differently than us. Our grandparents also behaved differently than our parents......ans so on and so fort.

These actors and actresses here are behaving like it's year 2011.



Thats true but in my opinion it still beats the crap that i see on TFC here in the states.... for me its not about the acting, costume, drama..etc..etc but instead trying to show some effort that we had a civilization.


there are two other historical Filipino movies that is worth checking out. Both acted like it was the 1970s

Lapu lapu the movie and Perlas Ng Silangan with FPJ

Lapu Lapu movie - note: check out their babaylan compared to the one in Amaya. the one in Lapu Lapu look like wannabe polynesian dancers
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v6D4K0pxY44


Amaya is more in tune with Perlas Ng Silagan in terms of costume and theme..

This post has been edited by Fictionicon: Jan 14 2012, 02:37 AM
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JohnComnenus
post Jan 14 2012, 05:53 AM
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back in elementary school days, we were taught that both men and women have equal status (like babaylans were put on high regard) during pre-colonial times, so in my humble opinion, i think it is acceptable on how the characters portrayed their roles, the women may have been more assertive during the precolonial times unlike the submissive ones during the colonial times.

the costumes and other props were great, they really put effort on it. the surprising thing for me is, that i never saw chinese traders there, and indians (based on appearance) spoke malay although i know it was the lingua franca of the region at that time but i was expecting some malay-looking people speaking in malay instead. and i thought some if not most of the nobles at that time practiced hinduism or buddhism unlike the rest of the population (or it was only limited in some areas like butuan and manila).

makes me want to see some movie based on the Conspiracy of Maharlikas during the early years of spaniards here. perhaps it may not be realized but i liked the story of conspiracy of maharlikas, it was a crucial moment for the history of the philippines
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nenabunena
post Jan 14 2012, 08:45 AM
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I tried to like the show because it was prehispanic but alas I hated it. I found it somewhat tacky, the acting was OA, the music background overbearing, the way it's directed very sloppily - ie. the introductory fighting where you could see how cheaply made the swords were, the supposed alipin acting so out of place as if she's been watching too many Filipino soaps, etc. It was just too much. I don't like many Filipino films, the most recent that I liked was Batch 81, which was back in 1981, you can watch it on youtube. I prefer Filipino Klasik films over the plethora of recent ones, I find the former far surpasses the latter in every conceivable way. My thoughts though.
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post Jan 14 2012, 10:48 AM
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QUOTE (nenabunena @ Jan 14 2012, 09:45 AM) *
I tried to like the show because it was prehispanic but alas I hated it. I found it somewhat tacky, the acting was OA, the music background overbearing, the way it's directed very sloppily - ie. the introductory fighting where you could see how cheaply made the swords were, the supposed alipin acting so out of place as if she's been watching too many Filipino soaps, etc. It was just too much. I don't like many Filipino films, the most recent that I liked was Batch 81, which was back in 1981, you can watch it on youtube. I prefer Filipino Klasik films over the plethora of recent ones, I find the former far surpasses the latter in every conceivable way. My thoughts though.



i grew up on the old late 80s and early 90s action movies where people are shooting at each other without ever changing the clip LOL

anyway, philippines is getting there in terms of cg effects..... if they ever made another Lapu Lapu movie, i would want it like the Ong Bak 2 production style
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jonathanrhino
post Jan 15 2012, 02:45 AM
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QUOTE (silangan @ Jan 14 2012, 01:23 AM) *
Is this supposed to be Pre-Spanish Philippines? Why are the women have so aggressive roles?
I've never seen it anyway, but this sample here is terrible.
Only the attire and the names are ancient. The way the performers conduct themselves is just like NOW.
Our parents behaved differently than us. Our grandparents also behaved differently than our parents......ans so on and so fort.
These actors and actresses here are behaving like it's year 2011.


It is appropriate to have dominant women during those times. Even today, Philippine society is actually inwardly matriarchal, outwardly patriarchal, that's the premise why we recently have 2 women presidents. If the teleserye would be as authentic as the pre hispanic Philippines, no one will understand it anymore.
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jonathanrhino
post Jan 15 2012, 02:58 AM
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QUOTE (nenabunena @ Jan 14 2012, 08:45 AM) *
I tried to like the show because it was prehispanic but alas I hated it. I found it somewhat tacky, the acting was OA, the music background overbearing, the way it's directed very sloppily - ie. the introductory fighting where you could see how cheaply made the swords were, the supposed alipin acting so out of place as if she's been watching too many Filipino soaps, etc. It was just too much. I don't like many Filipino films, the most recent that I liked was Batch 81, which was back in 1981, you can watch it on youtube. I prefer Filipino Klasik films over the plethora of recent ones, I find the former far surpasses the latter in every conceivable way. My thoughts though.


For me it would be a 7 out of 10. Yup, specially at the start, actors slip and use Spanish derived words. During rituals... sound scoring is reminscent of American Indian and not the pentatonic SEA sound. The best part is the mid portion of the story where the actors now have the fluidity of speaking classic Tagalog. Yup I agree. The props... specially towards the end looks cheap, the extras are unknown and are clueless on basic acting. The final costume of Dian Lamitan is not SEA pattern but Roman...hahaha. Overall, it still depicts pre hispanic Philippines better than any of the past works.
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nenabunena
post Jan 15 2012, 09:19 AM
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QUOTE (Fictionicon @ Jan 14 2012, 11:48 PM) *
i grew up on the old late 80s and early 90s action movies where people are shooting at each other without ever changing the clip LOL

anyway, philippines is getting there in terms of cg effects..... if they ever made another Lapu Lapu movie, i would want it like the Ong Bak 2 production style



I grew up in the 80s & 90s as well, but I only saw American films/shows & as a small child, they used to show Sine Klasiks which was my introduction to Philippine cinema. Back then, every cartoon was in english, now it's translated into tagalog. We were required to watch Rizal & Tanging Yaman for school but I thought Rizal could've been better. It was a bit OA as well in the acting department & I cringed everytime I heard Montano say anything in Spanish. I wish he had more time to practice those lines.

I don't really mean the CG effects, I don't expect them to be good. But our directing, acting & script is not up to standard IMO. I hated everytime there was a dramatic scene or you knew things were about to turn dangerously, when the background music was so amped up to ridiculous proportions. I didn't like the acting of the characters, I didn't think they were realistic, hated the scene where the friend alipin was forced to slap her friend with a stick. I thought that the fault, even the acting & the music was due mostly to the incompetence of the director.

But I would love to have a really grand Filipino production, something that would highlight our FMA, wouldn't that be cool? I don't like the Indie films that always deal with prostitution, kabaklaan, & squatter areas. Are these the films the international audience will see about Filipinos?
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nenabunena
post Jan 15 2012, 09:23 AM
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QUOTE (jonathanrhino @ Jan 15 2012, 03:58 PM) *
For me it would be a 7 out of 10. Yup, specially at the start, actors slip and use Spanish derived words. During rituals... sound scoring is reminscent of American Indian and not the pentatonic SEA sound. The best part is the mid portion of the story where the actors now have the fluidity of speaking classic Tagalog. Yup I agree. The props... specially towards the end looks cheap, the extras are unknown and are clueless on basic acting. The final costume of Dian Lamitan is not SEA pattern but Roman...hahaha. Overall, it still depicts pre hispanic Philippines better than any of the past works.



I've been trying to recall a prehispanic film I saw when I was a child in Sine Klasiks, you could tell by their hairstyles it was in the 70s. Either they were Ifugaos or prehispanic lowlanders. I saw Nora Aunor's Banaue that I thought was better than Amaya, but I didn't like it either because I somehow don't like Aunor. But 'Banaue' wasn't the prehispanic film I was looking for. Does anyone know any other prehispanic film? This was made in the 70s for sure.
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trismegistos
post Jan 15 2012, 08:17 PM
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I was expecting gold gilded hardwood houses, fortifications, cannons made by Panday pira, culverins or hand cannons referred by the Spaniards as arquebuses. But then again the setting was Central Visayas and not Manila. But Luzon traders who were often mistaken as Chinamen as according to William Henry Scott had been selling imported chinaware and speaking Malay to the residents of Central Visayas would have brought that defense technology too?

The battles would have been so spectacular as this about the sacking of the walled city of the Ancient Malay Langkasuka kingdom with all those Badjaos/sea gypsies fighting it out against the sea pirates and Muslim invaders... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_NhG3TVxStE

But then again, it looks like the Lucoes kept those technologies for themselves as the Battle of Mactan, (correct me if I'm wrong), there is no mention of any gunpowder technology being used unlike in the Battle of Bangkusay by Tarik Soliman with his Hagonoy warriors in Manila.

This post has been edited by trismegistos: Jan 15 2012, 08:48 PM
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martin_nuke
post Jan 16 2012, 08:12 PM
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Filipino movie lovers this is a must see movie beerchug.gif

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AnybodyKiller
post Jan 16 2012, 11:05 PM
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QUOTE (martin_nuke @ Jan 16 2012, 08:12 PM) *
Filipino movie lovers this is a must see movie beerchug.gif



Speaking of movies, A friend of mine on facebook just shared this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=33jCLaNE5dg
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post Jan 17 2012, 12:04 AM
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QUOTE (AnybodyKiller @ Jan 16 2012, 11:05 PM) *
Speaking of movies, A friend of mine on facebook just shared this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=33jCLaNE5dg



thanks for this post, is like part of that video from Old Manila
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nenabunena
post Jan 17 2012, 07:03 AM
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QUOTE (AnybodyKiller @ Jan 17 2012, 12:05 PM) *
Speaking of movies, A friend of mine on facebook just shared this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=33jCLaNE5dg



Thank you for sharing this find! I was not aware of this American production! Though it says 1934, the film itself is slightly reflective of silent talkies. Also, did they cast foreigners as leads? LOL! The lead guy was already balding, :P. I also noticed the game SIPA that Americans thought was an exercise for combat! This film reminds me of The Blairwitch Project in its advertisement or facade of authentic somewhat 'documentary'.

I don't know if this tale is based on some ancient historical love story or if the 1957 film I had seen was based on this 1934 American production. But I have to say I really enjoyed & thought the Filipino production to be very superior, the title is 'BADJAO'.

LANGUAGE: TAGALOG
SUBTITLE: ENGLISH

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7


This is a really really well-made film, I cannot stress how highly I recommend it! & to think we once made films such as these!
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AnybodyKiller
post Jan 17 2012, 02:56 PM
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QUOTE (nenabunena @ Jan 17 2012, 06:03 AM) *
Thank you for sharing this find! I was not aware of this American production! Though it says 1934, the film itself is slightly reflective of silent talkies. Also, did they cast foreigners as leads? LOL! The lead guy was already balding, :P. I also noticed the game SIPA that Americans thought was an exercise for combat! This film reminds me of The Blairwitch Project in its advertisement or facade of authentic somewhat 'documentary'.

I don't know if this tale is based on some ancient historical love story or if the 1957 film I had seen was based on this 1934 American production. But I have to say I really enjoyed & thought the Filipino production to be very superior, the title is 'BADJAO'.

LANGUAGE: TAGALOG
SUBTITLE: ENGLISH

Part 1
Part 2
Part 3
Part 4
Part 5
Part 6
Part 7


This is a really really well-made film, I cannot stress how highly I recommend it! & to think we once made films such as these!


Thanks Again!

I'll be sure to check it out when I get home. beerchug.gif

BTW: I was thinking the same thing. I think the leads were played by foreigners. embarassedlaugh.gif
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nenabunena
post Jan 17 2012, 04:53 PM
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QUOTE (AnybodyKiller @ Jan 18 2012, 03:56 AM) *
Thanks Again!

I'll be sure to check it out when I get home. beerchug.gif

BTW: I was thinking the same thing. I think the leads were played by foreigners. embarassedlaugh.gif



They don't even look mestiza/mestizo, they remind me too much of Hollywood actors, even the hairstyle & eyebrows were too Hollywood for the Philippines at that time! But it's a great find anyways1 I was surprised by the similarity of the story with BADJAO movie so wondered if the BADJAO film was a remake (except BETTER!) or if it's one of those old tales, Filipino version of Tristan & Isolde or Romeo & Juliet!
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AnybodyKiller
post Jan 17 2012, 10:26 PM
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QUOTE (nenabunena @ Jan 17 2012, 04:53 PM) *
They don't even look mestiza/mestizo, they remind me too much of Hollywood actors, even the hairstyle & eyebrows were too Hollywood for the Philippines at that time! But it's a great find anyways1 I was surprised by the similarity of the story with BADJAO movie so wondered if the BADJAO film was a remake (except BETTER!) or if it's one of those old tales, Filipino version of Tristan & Isolde or Romeo & Juliet!


I found myself rewinding trying to discern the same thing! embarassedlaugh.gif

That kind of casting exists in hollywood even to this day. In any case I'll have to check out BADJAO to get the better version.
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nenabunena
post Feb 17 2012, 02:38 PM
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Has anyone heard of John Sayles? He's an AMerican director with a bit of a following. Anyway, he directed a film called Amigo (2010) about the Philippine-American war. It's still not out on dvd, it was available through mediasharing links but since megaupload was shut down, all these links are now dead.

Here's the trailer:

AMIGO TRAILER




Review of the film: Review

QUOTE
American troops help an oppressed people to get rid of an unpopular and tyrannical government, but then find themselves in conflict with the rebels over the degree of independence the newly-liberated country should have. Sound familiar?

Without beating the viewer over the head, Sayles’ atmospheric and provocative period drama reminds us that there’s nothing new under the sun; over 100 years ago, the world’s youngest superpower was already finding that it’s easier to invade and conquer a foreign country than to rule it justly and understand all its cultural complexities.

Rather than Iraq or Afghanistan, the setting is the island of Luzon in the Philippines, but the problems are the same. The Spanish have been driven out, to general rejoicing, but the rebel forces, disappointed by the Americans’ refusal to grant immediate independence and autonomy, have turned against their erstwhile liberators. The US army, carrying out its government’s policy of introducing former Spanish colonies to what it sees as the civilising and modernising influence of democracy, begins to spread out across the sprawling island nation. They want to win over hearts and minds – but have plenty of firepower in reserve in case the ungrateful ‘goo-goos’ refuse to listen.

All this seems a long way from the peaceful, pastoral image of the film’s opening scenes. Rafael (Torre), the headman of a small village, is carrying out his duties: overseeing the harvest, mediating in petty local disputes and providing the village’s slender link to central authority by collecting the taxes. The only worry in his life is that his teenage son is chafing to join the ‘insurrectos’ in the jungle, who happen to be led by Rafael’s brother.

But the outside world intrudes in the shape of a column of American soldiers hunting the rebels. Their commander, Colonel Hardacre (Cooper), leaves a unit in the village commanded by Lieutenant Compton (Dillahunt), a young architect who volunteered in the recruitment drive to fight the Spanish in Cuba and now finds himself a long way from home and severely out of his depth.

He tries to keep the villagers onside, despite the fact that applying good American principles of democracy and equality means stripping Rafael of his power and setting him to work in the fields like all the others. He’s aided and abetted by the local priest (Vazquez), a Spanish missionary who sees Rafael’s traditional, tribal authority as a challenge to that of the Church and is keen to see him taken down a peg or two.

Meanwhile, the guerrillas are also leaning on Rafael to pass on information and share the village’s food with them. His son has joined their ranks and Rafael soon finds himself caught between two opposing camps, with jealous fellow villagers keen to undermine his position further. And when rebel attacks increase in the surrounding area, Hardacre is furious with Compton. He accuses the unit of ‘going native’ and demands they crack down hard – starting at the top...

It sometimes seems that John Sayles has been making cracking films since around the early 1900s. Like the work of Gilles Pontecorvo (whose colonial rebellion epics Battle Of Algiers and Queimada share some of Amigo’s DNA) they have an independent sensibility and a personal stamp, yet always boast high production values. They tackle complex issues and aren’t afraid to make political points, but never neglect the cinematic value of a well-told tale and sympathetic but multi-layered characters. He’s had the occasional breakout hit (most notably Lone Star in 1996) and is much in demand as a screenwriter and script doctor (said to be working on Jurassic Park IV as we speak) but to my mind has never had the recognition he deserves.

If there’s any justice, Amigo will change that. Its story may be pertinent to America’s recent history but its themes of divided loyalties, unlikely friendships forged then sundered, and the human cost of even a ‘justified’ war are universal. Like Lone Star and 1987’s Matewan (his best film, about an armed uprising by Virginia coal miners) it’s also a beautifully observed study of a small community remaining united in the face of seismic shifts.

Much of the credit goes to the man himself, as writer and director (and editor). But he’s aided by lush, atmospheric cinematography, Mason Daring’s evocative soundtrack and some truly top-notch performances. Dillahunt, a veteran of classy TV such as Deadwood and The Sarah Connor Chronicles and supporting roles in the likes of No Country For Old Men, brings intelligence and subtlety to what could simply be a clichéd ‘green loot’nant’ role. And Vazquez is a long way from his evil Mexican general in The A-Team as the passive-aggressive, manipulative ‘man of God’.

It’s a tribute to the relatively unknown Filipino actor Torre that he holds his own in such distinguished company, making Rafael an Everyman figure trying to live a good life with principled dignity but finding the violence and compromises of the world undermining all his certainties. And Cooper, a Sayles regular from way back when who’s now in regular demand with the mainstream directors, gives a typically commanding turn as the fearsome Hardacre, a veteran of the Indian wars who’s had the pity and humanity squeezed out of him by a lifetime of conflict.

The frequent references to the United States’ oldest and saddest attempt to impose its worldview on a race who didn’t want it are a reminder that Sayles’ best films have been Westerns in all but name. He shares the understanding of the frontier mentality and the dynamics of all-male groups that John Ford and Howard Hawks had. But he has the questing, probing intelligence of Peckinpah and the storytelling flair of Don Siegel too.

One might argue that the climax (and its bleak coda) are a tad manipulative, and the background details of the conflict are only sketchily outlined. But all cinema is trying to make you feel as well as think, and I’d defy anyone not to feel moved and angry by the end of this film. And the sense of ‘why exactly is all this happening?’ accurately reflects the bewilderment of Compton’s troops; rednecks and poor city boys fired by dreams of glory or straitened circumstance who find themselves in an alien land on a poorly defined and morally suspect mission. If the Western is truly the genre that, at its best, offers the greatest insight into America’s history and culture, then John Sayles can say, like John Ford: “I make Westerns”. And very, very good ones, too.



A question & answer portion by Sayles on the premiere of Amigo: Q&A

Interview with Sayles, the producer & Joel Torre on the film: INTERVIEW

The film seems to be pretty good, I just can't find it anywhere. I first became aware of the film when they were showing it on SM supermarket, in one of those tvs they were selling. I inquired about it & learned the title, the title admittedly turned me off. But I now wish I had gotten my hands on it before the megaupload was seized!

This post has been edited by nenabunena: Feb 17 2012, 02:41 PM
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AnybodyKiller
post Feb 17 2012, 02:48 PM
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QUOTE (nenabunena @ Feb 17 2012, 01:38 PM) *
Has anyone heard of John Sayles? He's an AMerican director with a bit of a following. Anyway, he directed a film called Amigo (2010) about the Philippine-American war. It's still not out on dvd, it was available through mediasharing links but since megaupload was shut down, all these links are now dead.

Here's the trailer:

AMIGO TRAILER





A question & answer portion by Sayles on the premiere of Amigo: Q&A

Interview with Sayles, the producer & Joel Torre on the film: INTERVIEW

The film seems to be pretty good, I just can't find it anywhere. I first became aware of the film when they were showing it on SM supermarket, in one of those tvs they were selling. I inquired about it & learned the title, the title admittedly turned me off. But I now wish I had gotten my hands on it before the megaupload was seized!


It's on Netflix Instant. It's an Okay movie (6.5 or 7/10) trying to capture the bitter-sweet relationship between the U.S and the Philippines.

Have you seen this one? This one I can really recommend.

_________________________________________
I actually know some people in this movie, It's an independent movie about the relationship between 1st Gen and 2nd Gen Fil-Ams. Actually set in Daly City where I currently reside! Characters a bit over the top, but it is a comedy embarassedlaugh.gif


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