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speedygOnzalez
SPANISH INFLUENCED DANCES:

PURITOS



JOTA DE ESPAñA



PAYPAY DE MANILA



PASTORES




PASEO DE ILOILO



PANTOMINA



JOTA DE PARAGUA




JOTA MANILEñA



HABANERA




CARIñOSA




forgot the name:


speedygOnzalez
RURAL FOLK DANCES:

SAYAW SA PANTALON



SABONG




PANDANGO SA ILAW




BINAUASAN




TINIKLING



forgot the names:




speedygOnzalez
CORDILLERAN DANCES

TAREKTEK




MANMANOK




LUMAGEN



SALISID



forgot the name:


Ralf
I discovered that the Moorland Library in Melbourne has a video tape available for loan, featuring traditional Asian dances, including some from the Philippines.
speedygOnzalez
MINDANAO DANCES

SINGKIL:



KAPA MALONG



PANGALAY HA PATTONG



PANGSAK



HARIBON

mangadiri
Heres a few different versions of janggay (metal claws) dance... you can also notice the head dress "ponompeng":

http://youtube.com/watch?v=BWfEGnK7K4Y


http://youtube.com/watch?v=cS2Rqw0K_-c&feature=related


Royal Asik dance :

http://youtube.com/watch?v=8JBAhUKYzew


Pagaper Fan dance and Gandingan dance:

http://youtube.com/watch?v=FGx_FO75Wm0
Bhaskara
(IMG:http://img29.picoodle.com/img/img29/4/4/29/f_sabong2m_49d615b.jpg)
Oh wow! Don't tell me that "sabong" means a cockfight, 'cos we have similar word of "sabung" for it! biggrin.gif

And you call the metal claws "janggay"? Hmm... we call it "tanggay", kinda weird, "j" doesn't usually translate as "t"...
There's actually a Malay dance named "Asyik", but I don't think it's similar to this "Asik" dance....
speedygOnzalez
QUOTE(Bhaskara @ Apr 29 2008, 09:12 PM) [snapback]3669907[/snapback]
(IMG:http://img29.picoodle.com/img/img29/4/4/29/f_sabong2m_49d615b.jpg)
Oh wow! Don't tell me that "sabong" means a cockfight, 'cos we have similar word of "sabung" for it! biggrin.gif

And you call the metal claws "janggay"? Hmm... we call it "tanggay", kinda weird, "j" doesn't usually translate as "t"...
There's actually a Malay dance named "Asyik", but I don't think it's similar to this "Asik" dance....


j usually ranslates to h

jose but u pronounce it as hose
pasajero - pasahero
janggay ?? nope
in tagalog its Tingga
*promo
QUOTE
"J" or
"G" as in
"George"

The closest sound I can find in Tagalog is the "diya" sound, where "jacket" becomes "diyaket" and "Joel" becomes "Diyo-el" or "Diyowel". "George" would become "Diyords" If used as part of a Spanish word, "J" would become an "H".


icon_rolleyes.gif
Narra


BULAKLAKAN
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j_90f3DXvHk
Narra
bloopers rotflmao.gif

When Sayaw Ed Tapew Na Bangko Goes Wrong!

clip 1
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7pd7cC7yPk

clip 2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EN09R1VTzZ0

paru parong bukid
(what went wrong with my scarf?? )

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7ztaCqqnuc

Pukol
(wheres my line)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKUljpIIIxk

mangadiri
QUOTE(Bhaskara @ Apr 29 2008, 09:12 PM) [snapback]3669907[/snapback]
(IMG:http://img29.picoodle.com/img/img29/4/4/29/f_sabong2m_49d615b.jpg)
Oh wow! Don't tell me that "sabong" means a cockfight, 'cos we have similar word of "sabung" for it! biggrin.gif

And you call the metal claws "janggay"? Hmm... we call it "tanggay", kinda weird, "j" doesn't usually translate as "t"...
There's actually a Malay dance named "Asyik", but I don't think it's similar to this "Asik" dance....



HEhehehe well I have a coworker from singapore and many of our words are similar to malay and indonesian:

Payong
Laut- (laot in tagalog)
Sepatu ( sapatos in tagalog)
Mukha -mukha (mukha in sanskrit muk in khmer)
Tehinga - Tenga (ears)
Otak- utak
mata- mata
Bangsa - bansa
pulau -pulo
taon- tahon
bulan -buan (bulan in ilokano dialect)
atay-atay
sakit- sakit
bersama or sama sama - sama , magkasama (together, togetherness)
makan- mangan, makan
minum- uminom
langit- langit
achar- atsara (achar hindi, achar nepali)
mura- mura
mahal- mahal
cinta - sinta
penoh, penuh- puno (filled)
bukah- bukas (open)
pintu - pinto...
etc etc etc etc
mangadiri
QUOTE(mangadiri @ Apr 30 2008, 10:38 AM) [snapback]3670788[/snapback]
HEhehehe well I have a coworker from singapore and many of our words are similar to malay and indonesian:

Payong
Laut- (laot in tagalog)
Sepatu ( sapatos in tagalog)
Mukha -mukha (mukha in sanskrit muk in khmer)
Tehinga - Tenga (ears)
Otak- utak
mata- mata
Bangsa - bansa
pulau -pulo
taon- tahon
bulan -buan (bulan in ilokano dialect)
atay-atay
sakit- sakit
bersama or sama sama - sama , magkasama (together, togetherness)
makan- mangan, makan
minum- uminom
langit- langit
achar- atsara (achar hindi, achar nepali)
mura- mura
mahal- mahal
cinta - sinta
penoh, penuh- puno (filled)
bukah- bukas (open)
pintu - pinto...
bibir- bibig mouth
etc etc etc etc

speedygOnzalez
COMPLETE SPANISH INFLUENCED DANCES


Alcamfor

From Leyte comes this couples dance in which the girl holds a handkerchief laced with camphor oil, a substance which supposedly induces romance.


Andaluz

Also known as Paseo de Iloilo, for its province of origin, this is one of the most sophisticated courtship and flirtation dances of the Spanish era. The gentlemen compete among each other to win the heart of the dalaga, or young lady, by exemplifying chivalry, grace, and confidence.


Aray

A dance whose words are sung in "Chabacano-ermitense," a hybrid of Spanish that was only spoken in the Ermita district before the turn of the century and today is extinct. The dance itself is a flirtatious one that involves graceful use of the pañuelo, or shawl, and tambourines. Aray means "ouch" in Tagalog.


Balse

Derived from the Spanish "valse" (waltz), this dance was popular in Marikina, Rizal province, during the Spanish times. Balse was performed after the lutrina (a religious procession), and the music that accompanied the dancers was played by the musikong bungbong (musicians using instruments made of bamboo).



Cariñosa

This flirtatious dance is known throughout the Philippines. Cariñosa means affectionate, lovable, or amiable. With a fan or handkerchief, the dancers go through hide-and-seek movements and other flirting acts expressing tender feelings for one another. There are many versions of this dance, but the hide-and-seek movements are common in all.


Chotis

The Chotis (or "Shotis") was one of the ballroom dances learned by the Filipinos from the early European settlers. This dance, from Camarines Sur, has been adapted by the Bicolano people and is characterized by a brush-step-hop movement.



Escopiton Malandog

According to legend, two boys named Esco and Piton introduced this dance during the inauguration of the founding of San Jose de Buenavista. Eventually the dance was called Escopiton. This beautiful dance originated from Malandog, a barrio of Hamtic in Antique.


Estudiantina

A very lively and gay dance. During the old days, this dance was a favorite in social gatherings and was performed by the estudiantinas, women who were students of private schools and colleges in Manila. They are seen holding a book in one hand throughout the dance.


Habanera

A wedding party dance which originated in the town of Botolan in the Zambales Province. Typical sequences include the procession of the bride and groom's parents, lineup of the bridesmaids and groomsmen upstage, and a solo featuring the wedding couple.


La Jota


The jota encompasses a variety of Spanish-influenced dances accompanied by the use of bamboo castanets, held loosely and unstrung. There are many forms of jota in the Philippines whose names are derived from their regions of origin. A common progression in the jota is a quick & lively verse, followed by a slow bridge, and ending with a verse in the same lively tempo as in the beginning.

Jota Española

Highlighted by castanets, abanicos, and tambourines.


Jota Gumaqueña

Once very popular among the well-heeled families of Gumaca, Tayabas (now Quezon). A well-known local musician at the time, Señor Herminigildo Omana, introduced this dance. It became popular with the young people and was handed down between generations.


Jota Manileña (Manila)

It originated in the capital city around the 19th century.



Jota Moncadeña (Moncada, Tarlac)

A combination of Spanish and Ilocano dance steps and music.



Jota Pangasinana

Demonstrates the flair of stomping feet culminating with the cry of "Olé!"


Jota de Paragua (Cuyo, Palawan)


Displays a Castillan influence with Zapateados (footwork), Lobrados (arms), and Sevillana style of dress. The ladies wave their mantón, or decorative shawl, while the gentlemen keep brisk pace with bamboo castanets.


Jovencita


A dance typical of a woman's debut or even her wedding. The accompanying love ballad was written by Maestro Nitoy Gonzales when he was courting Jovita Friese, who then choreographed the graceful and beautiful habanera dance that accompanies it. Jovencita means "young lady" in Spanish.


Lanceros de Negros


During the Spanish time, this dance was one of the popular quadrille dances in the Philippines. It is similar to the stately Rigodon de Honor and is danced in important social affairs to formally open a big ball. One version from Silay, Negros Occidental, is performed in a lengthwise formation.


Mazurka Boholana


This dance is a traditional ballroom dance popular in Bohol and in other provinces during the Spanish times.


Panderetas

This dance, named after the jingle-less tambourines carried by the females, originates from Tanza, Iloilo. From December 16 to January 6, a group of people in the Visayan regions go from house to house to sing Christmas called "Daigon." In some regions the song is usually followed by some dances, and "Las Panderetas" is one of those dances.
Paseo de Iloilo


Paso Doble



Meaning "two-step," the name is actually a misnomer, as it is an ordinary walking or marching step called the "one-step." The term refers to the stirring marching music played as background music at bullfights and fiestas throughout Spain.


Putritos

A festival dance from Atimonan, Tayabas (now Quezon province), featuring a couple's flirtatious and playful interaction. It is danced in alternating slow and fast waltz tempos and culminates in a vivid twirling sequence by the girl.


Rigodon de Honor

This elegant dance was brought to the Philippines by the Filipinos who returned from their travels abroad during the Spanish era. This dance takes its name from its opening performances at formal affairs such as the President's Inaugural Ball. Members of government, including the President and First Lady, diplomatic corps, and other state officials usually participate in the Rigodon. Traditionally, a ballroom waltz dance would follow the Rigodon.

mangadiri
QUOTE(speedygOnzalez @ Apr 30 2008, 10:02 PM) [snapback]3671993[/snapback]
COMPLETE SPANISH INFLUENCED DANCES
Alcamfor

From Leyte comes this couples dance in which the girl holds a handkerchief laced with camphor oil, a substance which supposedly induces romance.
Andaluz

Also known as Paseo de Iloilo, for its province of origin, this is one of the most sophisticated courtship and flirtation dances of the Spanish era. The gentlemen compete among each other to win the heart of the dalaga, or young lady, by exemplifying chivalry, grace, and confidence.
Aray

A dance whose words are sung in "Chabacano-ermitense," a hybrid of Spanish that was only spoken in the Ermita district before the turn of the century and today is extinct. The dance itself is a flirtatious one that involves graceful use of the pañuelo, or shawl, and tambourines. Aray means "ouch" in Tagalog.
Balse

Derived from the Spanish "valse" (waltz), this dance was popular in Marikina, Rizal province, during the Spanish times. Balse was performed after the lutrina (a religious procession), and the music that accompanied the dancers was played by the musikong bungbong (musicians using instruments made of bamboo).
Cariñosa

This flirtatious dance is known throughout the Philippines. Cariñosa means affectionate, lovable, or amiable. With a fan or handkerchief, the dancers go through hide-and-seek movements and other flirting acts expressing tender feelings for one another. There are many versions of this dance, but the hide-and-seek movements are common in all.
Chotis

The Chotis (or "Shotis") was one of the ballroom dances learned by the Filipinos from the early European settlers. This dance, from Camarines Sur, has been adapted by the Bicolano people and is characterized by a brush-step-hop movement.
Escopiton Malandog

According to legend, two boys named Esco and Piton introduced this dance during the inauguration of the founding of San Jose de Buenavista. Eventually the dance was called Escopiton. This beautiful dance originated from Malandog, a barrio of Hamtic in Antique.
Estudiantina

A very lively and gay dance. During the old days, this dance was a favorite in social gatherings and was performed by the estudiantinas, women who were students of private schools and colleges in Manila. They are seen holding a book in one hand throughout the dance.
Habanera

A wedding party dance which originated in the town of Botolan in the Zambales Province. Typical sequences include the procession of the bride and groom's parents, lineup of the bridesmaids and groomsmen upstage, and a solo featuring the wedding couple.
La Jota
The jota encompasses a variety of Spanish-influenced dances accompanied by the use of bamboo castanets, held loosely and unstrung. There are many forms of jota in the Philippines whose names are derived from their regions of origin. A common progression in the jota is a quick & lively verse, followed by a slow bridge, and ending with a verse in the same lively tempo as in the beginning.

Jota Española

Highlighted by castanets, abanicos, and tambourines.
Jota Gumaqueña

Once very popular among the well-heeled families of Gumaca, Tayabas (now Quezon). A well-known local musician at the time, Señor Herminigildo Omana, introduced this dance. It became popular with the young people and was handed down between generations.
Jota Manileña (Manila)

It originated in the capital city around the 19th century.
Jota Moncadeña (Moncada, Tarlac)

A combination of Spanish and Ilocano dance steps and music.
Jota Pangasinana

Demonstrates the flair of stomping feet culminating with the cry of "Olé!"
Jota de Paragua (Cuyo, Palawan)
Displays a Castillan influence with Zapateados (footwork), Lobrados (arms), and Sevillana style of dress. The ladies wave their mantón, or decorative shawl, while the gentlemen keep brisk pace with bamboo castanets.
Jovencita
A dance typical of a woman's debut or even her wedding. The accompanying love ballad was written by Maestro Nitoy Gonzales when he was courting Jovita Friese, who then choreographed the graceful and beautiful habanera dance that accompanies it. Jovencita means "young lady" in Spanish.
Lanceros de Negros
During the Spanish time, this dance was one of the popular quadrille dances in the Philippines. It is similar to the stately Rigodon de Honor and is danced in important social affairs to formally open a big ball. One version from Silay, Negros Occidental, is performed in a lengthwise formation.
Mazurka Boholana
This dance is a traditional ballroom dance popular in Bohol and in other provinces during the Spanish times.
Panderetas

This dance, named after the jingle-less tambourines carried by the females, originates from Tanza, Iloilo. From December 16 to January 6, a group of people in the Visayan regions go from house to house to sing Christmas called "Daigon." In some regions the song is usually followed by some dances, and "Las Panderetas" is one of those dances.
Paseo de Iloilo


Paso Doble

Meaning "two-step," the name is actually a misnomer, as it is an ordinary walking or marching step called the "one-step." The term refers to the stirring marching music played as background music at bullfights and fiestas throughout Spain.
Putritos

A festival dance from Atimonan, Tayabas (now Quezon province), featuring a couple's flirtatious and playful interaction. It is danced in alternating slow and fast waltz tempos and culminates in a vivid twirling sequence by the girl.
Rigodon de Honor

This elegant dance was brought to the Philippines by the Filipinos who returned from their travels abroad during the Spanish era. This dance takes its name from its opening performances at formal affairs such as the President's Inaugural Ball. Members of government, including the President and First Lady, diplomatic corps, and other state officials usually participate in the Rigodon. Traditionally, a ballroom waltz dance would follow the Rigodon.


Is'nt Mazurka a polish dance????????????
flipcombatmedic
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hMnk7lh9M3o
this has got to be the most popular.
rukikay
whats funny is that some of these people who dance singkil in their school fair or something probably hate on muslim tribes of philippines

Bhaskara
@flipcombat: Hahaha, neat!

@rukikay: Really?
mangadiri
IPAG performs dance in LA show... One of the best representations of pangalay with langka silat moves:
http://youtube.com/watch?v=Go0JFS0Fn5s&...ted&search=
Narra


Asian Latina Dance (Filipino Dance) EurAsian

Aray!:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YHarhDrXygQ

Habanera de Jovencita:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pr4fU5l5sq4

Jota De Manila:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBiL2cXCzHw




for more info: http://www.lkdance.org.uk/folkdances.php
Torete_ako_sa_yo
Dancesport Team Cebu - Barangay Workshop

They're teaching Ballroom to kids for free. It's a good way to keep the kids occupied from doing mischief, they learn skills inherent in professional dance, some kids will be able to find a career in it, and culturally it livens up the community.

Dancesport-Team Cebu City to hold barangay-based workshop


Cebu Daily News
First Posted 10:21:00 03/23/2008

FOLLOWING A tremendous year which saw the fabled Dancesport-Team Cebu City capture accolades left and right, the group tries to give it all back to the different urban and mountain barangays of Cebu as it stages a Barangay-Based Summer Dancesport Workshop 2008.

The benchmark program is being headed by dancesport directress Ricca Alix and aims to continue what has been taught in the Barangay-Based Summer Dancesport Workshops.

It also looks to improve the knowledge of the participants in the basic principles of each dance and create a core group in each barangay to sustain the growth of dancesport in the barangay level.

Registration for the urban barangays commences on March 31 and will last until April 25 while the mountain barangays’ registration starts on April 3 and will end on April 26. Registration time is at 12 to 5 pm, Thursday and Saturday.

The venues for the urban barangays are as follows: Tejero, Mabolo, Banilad, Camputhaw, Pahina Central, Labangon, Punta, Mambaling, Suba, Guadalupe, Basak San Nicolas, Poblacion, Pardo, Sambag 2, Cogon Ramos and San Roque. Mountain barangays are Sudlon 2, Babag, Busay, Talamban, Guba, Pit-os and Paril.

The summer workshop is a joint project of Cebu City mayor Tomas Osmeña and the government of Cebu, Liga ng mga Barangay Kagawad ng Pilipinas headed by Cebu chapter president Manuel Guanzon and the Sanggunian Kabataan Federation under councilor Rengele Pelayo. Correspondent Jonas Panerio
Narra
THE PHILIPPINE ALL-STARS BRING HOME THE GOLD AT THE 2006 HIP HOP INTERNATIONAL FINALS!

Junior Division
3rd place: Ireland (Streets Ahead)
2nd Place: Japan (Next Jr.)
1st place: USA (Mini Shock)

Varsity Division
3rd Place: Japan (Kana-Boon)
2nd Place: USA (Hip Hop Connection)
1st Place: USA (Future Shock)

Adult Division
3rd Place: Trinidad(Eclectic)
2nd Place: New Zeland (Dziah)
1st Place: Philipines(All stars)

The Philippine All-Stars, coached by Jungee Marcelo, performs during the final slot of the 2006 Hip Hop International Finals. They performed to a wonderful mix of hip hop, which included "Bebot" by the Black Eyed Peas. Ken "Kenjhons" Serrano was the lead choreographer of the Allstars' routine. After all was said and done, the Philippines emerged as the world champions with the Gold, New Zealand finished with Silver, and Trinidad & Tobago came away with Bronze.


video:
Philippine All Star
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2UN6g74-pQ
Narra
Bayanihan Dancers win World Folk Dance Title

The multi-awarded Bayanihan Dance Company are grand champions at the World Folk Dance Festival in Spain.

The 27-person delegation, including seven musicians and 16 dancers were declared "absolute winner," or the grand champion of the 22nd World Folk Dance Festival besting delegations from 50 countries of Africa, Asia, Europe and the Americas.




The entry of the 50-year-old Bayanihan was an eight-minute dance narrative called "The Voyage for Love and Peace," which told the tale of star-crossed lovers through several famous Philippine folk dances, including the singkil and the kuntao.

The Bayanihan troupe won the nod of the judges from Spain, Australia, Argentina, the Netherlands and Wales.

"We depicted the voyage for love and peace. We weaved the dances together with the story," said the company's executive director Suzie Benitez.

"We said we wanted to tell the story of the Philippines, we wanted them to see our culture, but we also wanted to win. And so when they called us the grand champion, we were all feeling so high, and so proud, and the sprinkling of Filipinos who were there were all crying with us," she said.

Narra
Bayanihan wins Turkey Grand Prize
Bayanihan, the national dance company of the Philippines won the Grand Prize at the 8th International Buyukcekmece Culture and Art Festival in Istanbul, Turkey. The group bested two other finalists: dance troupes from Venezuela and Russia.

The Bayanihan delegation was headed by Suzie Moya Benites, executive director; Isabel Santos, artistic and costume director; and choreographer Ferdinand Jose, who won the Best Choreography Award.

A guest performance in Bahrain during the Spring of Culture Festival started the national dance company’s international tour this year. Spain was next in the itinerary where Bayanihan won the prestigious Absolute Winner award during the 12th World Folkdance Festival international.

In between the international journeys and dance rehearsals, Bayanihan conducted its Teaching and Touching Lives transformative program and its Summer Sayaw Workshop. After its performance in Istanbul, the group proceeded to Bursa to participate in the International Golden Karagoz Dance Festival.

Bayanihan, which is celebrating its 50th year anniversary has performed worldwide and has received awards from many international competitions among them the Gold Temple Award and the Absolute Gold Award in Sicily. It has the distinction of being the first Filipino group to break into Broadway; the first non-American dance company to perform at the New York State Theater of the Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts; the first Filipino cultural group to perform in Russia and PROC; and the first Filipino dance company to perform at the World Showcase Millennium Village EPCOT, Disneyland, Florida.
Narra
Multi Diverse

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=meimChz26Ac
Narra
Modern Folk Dance

Modern Tinikling

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mZhw3QURwhE


Modern Singkil

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_tHRu6eZpT4

Modern Sakuting

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ouJz6Ddq6GA
Narra
Modern Maglalatik
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jF4Je_vuyXI
Narra
Other Philippine Ethnic Dances:

Banog - Cordillera In this dance, performers portray hunters shielding their chickens from the famishing hawk. The hawk ends up entrapped and dies in the hands of hunters.

Salisid - Kalinga, Cordillera This is a courtship dance that symbolizes a rooster trying to attract the attention of a hen. This is performed and portrayed by both male and female dancers as the rooster and hen respectively. The dance starts when each of them are given a piece of cloth known as "ayob" or "allap".

Palok - Kalinga, Cordillera - A tribal dance. The natives of Kalinga perform this dance in most of their social events. Male dancers hold gangsa or gong- a percussion instrument made of copper, and beat it with wooden stick.

Lumagen - Kalinga, Cordillera A tribal dance. This is a traditional thanksgiving dance by the Kalinga tribe performed to celebrate good harvest and events such as birth of first-born child, victory in battles and weddings.

Idudu- Abra, Cordillera A tribal dance. This dance stages a common family life in the Itneg or Tinguian society. It illustrates the family as the main foundation of the tribe’s community. Several traits of an ordinary family are shown. It depicts a father plowing the field while the mother caring for the children. But as soon as the father finishes work, the mother takes over on planting, sowing and all the remaining chores to do in the field. At this time the father is left to take care of the kids. During the dance a Local singer breaks into an Idudu or lullaby to put the baby to sleep. Idudu, a dance taken from Idudu lullaby, obviously portrays the different roles in a Tinguian family

Dinuyya - Cordillera Ifugao dance Famous in the Ifugao region, this dance is regularly staged during festivals in Lagawe. Three kinds of gong instruments such as, ordinary gongs, tobtob- a brass gong played by beating with open palms and, hibat, a kind of gong played by beating the inner surface with a softwood are used in this dance.

Bendayan - Benguet This dance, which is more known as Bendian, is performed to commemorate the arrival of headhunters in their district. Performers dance in a circle and show off their lively traditional steps.

Binaylan - Agusan This is a ritual dance, which originated from the Bagobo tribe living in the central uplands of Mindanao, imitating the movements of a hen, her banog or baby chicks, and a hawk. The hawk is sacred and is believed that it has the power over the well being of the tribe. The hawk tries to capture one of the baby chicks and is killed by the hunters.

Malakas at maganda - Leyte A Tribal dance. This dance depicts the birth of the first man and woman who came out of a bamboo tree. It has been said that the woman named “maganda” (beautiful) and the first man “malakas” (strong) are the parents of the whole community in the island. The dance demonstrates how a bird discovered the noise coming from the inside of the bamboo and perched until it opened. A man and a woman came out of the big bamboo tree and, the birth of this legendary couple is amusingly interpreted in this dance.

Burung-Talo - Sulu The dance is a unique fighting dance in a form of martial arts by the Tausug tribe. Performers demonstrate a battle between hawk and a cat. With their acrobatic movements and tough facial expressions, this dance is highlighted with the accompanying energetic beat of drums and gongs.

Kadal-Blelah- South Cotabato A tribal dance where in the dancers perform simulation of movements of birds.

Kadal Tahaw - Tiboli dance- south cotabato A tribal dance performed by Tiboli tribe, this dance that mimics the hopping and flying behavior of Tahaw bird is performed to celebrate good harvest.

Sayaw sa Cuyo - Palawan Cuyo is a small island and capital of Palawan. There, the feast day of St. Augustin is traditionally celebrated with parades, processions and small performances by groups coming from all over Cuyo Island and the nearby islets. Island dances, blended with strong Old Cuyo ethnicity and Spanish-influenced steps, are all brought out when Cuyo celebrates its festivals. Today, pretty young girls daintily swirl hats to the waltz and other European steps designed to bring out the freshness and glow of the performers.

Karatong - Palawan A Muslim dance. During the festival of San Agustine in the island of Cuyo, the celebration also includes the blossoming of mango trees. The parade starts from the church patio and ends at the town plaza with ladies waving their colorful props “Bunga mangga” that symbolize the flowers of mango tree, while men lively strike their karatong instruments; creating a scene of joy among reveling towns folk.

Dugso - Bukidnon A thanksgiving dance from the talaindig tribe.

Gayong-gayong - Capiz -A Muslim dance. In rural gatherings, this dance offers much fun. Gayong is a pet name for Leodegario. According to the legend and to the words of the song, Gayong and Masiong (pet name for Dalmacio) once attended a feast commemorating the death of a townsman. While eating, Masiong choked on a piece of Adobo so he called, "Gayong! Gayong!" to ask for help to dislodge a bone from the Adobo meal from his throat. In this dance, Masiong’s liking for feasts and the consequence of his gluttony are held up to playful ridicule.

Kapa Malong-Malong - Cotabato A Muslim dance. This Maranao dance is performed with women wearing malong and shawl, mantle or head piece, whereas men wear sash or waist band, shorts or bahag and head gear or turban traditionally worn in the fields.

Pagapir - Lanao del Sur This dance is usually performed to commence an important affair. Dancers of this dance are usually from the royal court or high society group of Lanao Province. They use apir or fan to coordinate with their small steps called kini-kini, which symbolizes their good manners and prominent family background.

Pangalay- Zamboanga Del Sur A muslim dance. Originally performed by wealthy families during a wedding celebration, this fingernail
Narra
Philippine wins Gold! - 2008 World Hip Hop Dance Championship
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MsdFjIgJVHw

The Philippine All Stars won the gold medal at the 2008 World Hip Hop Dance Championship Sunday at Planet Hollywood, Las Vegas, USA

aiko
Philippines Dance Craze!

its Macarena & Asereje in Spain
La Bamba in Mexico
Lambada in Brazil
Volare in Italy

we have this...

Papaya Dance
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VgyNyaMbtcs

Patcha
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JaSP3pUrX9U


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nlu_WH5_o4o
Torete_ako_sa_yo
QUOTE(aiko @ Sep 18 2008, 04:37 AM) [snapback]3927693[/snapback]

Hahahaha!!!

Todo Todo

Man, why we flips so into line-dancing, it's awesome.

ballroom in the Philippines

salamat
I personally like the dances originating from Mindanao

the tboli dance ...and the maranao dance, singkil
ham_let
LOL it's so true. at every barrio fiesta or wedding there's some fu-king line dancing
martin_nuke
The Original Filipino Dance
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nas6S_yOEU4
aiko
Pinoy Dance craze!!!

Kembot
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCx3A4Zjdd0

Dulce Tira Tira
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QC6Ys5LHUNM

Narra
Pinoy Dance Craze!

Boom Tarat Tarat
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9WgAoZPnLG4

FootBall Boom Tarat Tarat
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLgTK40L9G4


felltohell
QUOTE(Torete_ako_sa_yo @ Sep 18 2008, 04:09 PM) [snapback]3928246[/snapback]
Hahahaha!!!

Todo Todo

Man, why we flips so into line-dancing, it's awesome.

ballroom in the Philippines



QUOTE(aiko @ Sep 22 2008, 11:47 PM) [snapback]3934106[/snapback]



QUOTE(Narra @ Oct 2 2008, 05:36 AM) [snapback]3947206[/snapback]
Pinoy Dance Craze!

Boom Tarat Tarat
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9WgAoZPnLG4

FootBall Boom Tarat Tarat
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLgTK40L9G4

I thought Filipino Dances?
not Crazy dances

ew ew ew
Torete_ako_sa_yo
QUOTE(felltohell @ Oct 2 2008, 05:42 AM) [snapback]3947217[/snapback]
I thought Filipino Dances?
not Crazy dances

ew ew ew

You gotta take the good, boring, and the cheezy.

Maybe this one will make you feel better
CheamKhmer
no offense it looks like african tribal dance and mexican fiesta or marti grawl or however u spell that $hit
Graham_Cracker07
QUOTE(CheamKhmer @ Oct 5 2008, 02:58 AM) [snapback]3951577[/snapback]
no offense it looks like african tribal dance and mexican fiesta or marti grawl or however u spell that $hit


Which ones are you talking about? Yeah, most the folk dances have Mexican/Spanish influence. A lot of dances at our festivals like Ati-Atihan and Dinagyang look like something out of Africa, but these are usually not traditional Filipino dances. They are coreographed dances that are probably inspired from African tribal stuff since it fits the tribal theme of the festivals.
AzNboii
bboying at tha mall
Torete_ako_sa_yo
QUOTE(CheamKhmer @ Oct 5 2008, 02:58 AM) [snapback]3951577[/snapback]
no offense it looks like african tribal dance and mexican fiesta or marti grawl or however u spell that $hit

It's Mardi Gras, and some would consider Sinulog of Cebu or Ati-atihan of Iloilo as our version of Mardi Gras, only that it's a couple of weeks early.
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