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Bhaskara
I think the forum in serious case of needing lighter topics, that's why I'm starting this thread. Saya cukup faham mengenai tari-tarian Melayu di kepulauan kami, akan tetapi saya kurang faham mengenai tari-tarian Melayu yang ada di semenanjung. Marilah kita saling berbagi maklumat, samada itu adalah gambar, video, maupun sejarah dan ceritera di sebalik tari-tarian tersebut.

Sorry if my Malay sounds weird to you guys icon_redface.gif

Anyway, from what I know, there's one universal dance in the Malay world, whether it is in Malaysia, Brunei Darussalam, Singapore, or Indonesia. That is: Zapin

http://youtube.com/watch?v=Tef9TJJUjzQ
Does any of you have the pics and videos to share?
And how about other dance forms? Do share with the rest of us!
Esfandiari
I can't think of one right now! How about this old P. Ramlee song named 'Azizah' from the Malay movie 'Penarik Beca'? Nice song, may be some people can do a Malay tarian to it??

When Anwar Ibrahim was in prisom, this was the song he sang so much....reminded him so much of his wife!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WheZVwAGZDE

Or this other old P. Ramlee song, 'Tanya Sama Hati', also from 'Penarik Beca'?


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=utQp-gcHBUA&NR=1
Bhaskara
So there are becas in Malaysia too, huh? embarassedlaugh.gif I didn't know that.
dreamhunter
Some people say that the oldest, most original forms of Budaya Melayu, including Tarian Melayu, w.r.t. to Semenanjung Melayu, r to be found in the north. Cos that's where the earliest Malay states started, i.e. the kingdoms that together formed the Langkasuka Alliance, i.e. the cradle of classical Malay civilisation in the Semenanjung.

Whereas the Budaya/Tarian Melayu of the southern Semenanjung came much later n has a decidedly greater Javanese or Sumatran influence. Topped up again by later Arabic etc. influences.

While others say that, at first impression, the old Budaya/Tarian Melayu of the northerrn region seems to be some sort of half-way house between Budaya/Tarian Thai n Budaya/Tarian Jawa.

My 2 cents' worth:

Siamese culture was drawn from old Angkor Khmer culture, as both Sukothai n Ayutthaya were acknowledged as former Khmer provinces under the Angkor realm before they were conquered by Thai princes n reinvented into early Thai kingdoms.

In turn, the culture of Angkor Khmer, n before that Chenla Khmer, were drawn from that of Funan, widely acknowledged as the earliest civilised kingdom in SEA.

While old Semenanjung Melayu culture, specifically northern Melayu culture, were also modelled on old Funanese culture.

That then explains the slight similarities between northern Budaya/Tarian Melayu n Budaya/Tarian Thai.

Whether old Funan was ethnically Malay or ethnically Khmer is then another matter.

Have you heard of Mak Yong n Menora? These r Kelantanese folk dances. Menora definitely has that Thai feel about it. If I'm not mistaken, it's got an all-male cast. Even the role of princess/queen is played by a man. Heavily made up, of course.
Bhaskara
QUOTE(dreamhunter @ Apr 6 2008, 02:45 AM) [snapback]3616683[/snapback]
Some people say that the oldest, most original forms of Budaya Melayu, including Tarian Melayu, w.r.t. to Semenanjung Melayu, r to be found in the north. Cos that's where the earliest Malay states started, i.e. the kingdoms that together formed the Langkasuka Alliance, i.e. the cradle of classical Malay civilisation in the Semenanjung.

Whereas the Budaya/Tarian Melayu of the southern Semenanjung came much later n has a decidedly greater Javanese or Sumatran influence. Topped up again by later Arabic etc. influences.

While others say that, at first impression, the old Budaya/Tarian Melayu of the northerrn region seems to be some sort of half-way house between Budaya/Tarian Thai n Budaya/Tarian Jawa.

My 2 cents' worth:

Siamese culture was drawn from old Angkor Khmer culture, as both Sukothai n Ayutthaya were acknowledged as former Khmer provinces under the Angkor realm before they were conquered by Thai princes n reinvented into early Thai kingdoms.

In turn, the culture of Angkor Khmer, n before that Chenla Khmer, were drawn from that of Funan, widely acknowledged as the earliest civilised kingdom in SEA.

While old Semenanjung Melayu culture, specifically northern Melayu culture, were also modelled on old Funanese culture.

That then explains the slight similarities between northern Budaya/Tarian Melayu n Budaya/Tarian Thai.

Whether old Funan was ethnically Malay or ethnically Khmer is then another matter.

Have you heard of Mak Yong n Menora? These r Kelantanese folk dances. Menora definitely has that Thai feel about it. If I'm not mistaken, it's got an all-male cast. Even the role of princess/queen is played by a man. Heavily made up, of course.

I have to say that I never know any Malay dance which has similarities with Javanese dance icon_neutral.gif Most of the Malay dances I know have heavy Arabic/Persian/Indian influences instead.
I've actually watched Thai and Lao Manohra. According to Dara, our Cambodian guru, Manohra style dance actually came from the Malay peninsula, then it was adopted by our Indochinese friends. I've never seen Mak Yong dance before, but I do know that the Malay Peninsula came up with it first, then later, my brethren in Sumatra adopted it from you guys.
So Malay peninsula have actually influenced its neighbors with its dance styles. Too bad, I don't think you guys fully realize this fact, and you don't really give a damn about these heritages.
dreamhunter
QUOTE(Bhaskara @ Apr 6 2008, 09:06 PM) [snapback]3619346[/snapback]
I have to say that I never know any Malay dance which has similarities with Javanese dance icon_neutral.gif Most of the Malay dances I know have heavy Arabic/Persian/Indian influences instead.

I've actually watched Thai and Lao Manohra. According to Dara, our Cambodian guru, Manohra style dance actually came from the Malay peninsula, then it was adopted by our Indochinese friends. I've never seen Mak Yong dance before, but I do know that the Malay Peninsula came up with it first, then later, my brethren in Sumatra adopted it from you guys.
So Malay peninsula have actually influenced its neighbors with its dance styles. Too bad, I don't think you guys fully realize this fact, and you don't really give a damn about these heritages.


Some Johorean dances would have had some, if not that much, Javanese influences, I would have thought. Cos a large percentage of Johoreans have like a mixed Malay-Javanese ancestry.

If your Cambodian guru was right about the Menora, that's really interesting, I think. Well, it's quite logical actually, if you consider that Malays came first to SEA, followed by Mon n Khmer, followed again by Thai, Seam n Lao.

So Malay culture would have been an older culture than Mon n Khmer, let alone Thai, Seam n Lao, in mainland SEA. Although we have to admit we didn't rise to such heights of glory, especially the temple-building stuff, like the Angkorean Khmers once did.

Funny, but if you just go ask the average Malay youth to go see a Menora play n ask them what they think, they'd v likely say that it looks like a Thai/Siamese thing.

But Mak Yong I think is an ethnic Kelantanese dance through n through.

I'd say again that old Funan would have been the likely link between Malay n Khmer cultures. While Thai, Seam n Lao cultures would have borrowed heavily from the Khmer peoples that they first submitted to, n later defeated n conquered.
dreamhunter
Throghout the reign of Funan as the regional power, the 'Rome', of ancient SEA, the kingdoms of the Langkasuka Alliance, especially the eastern side, like Pattani, Kelantan n Kedah was under vassalage to, or protection of, Funan. That was from late first century or earlier, until 550 AD, when Funan completely collapsed n was absorbed by Khmer Chenla.

There would have been much Malay-Khmer cultural interaction during that Funanese time. Funan itself was a mixed Malay-Mon-Khmer realm. As to who actually ruled at the very top is something of considerable debate. Well, at least between certain quarters.

After Funan fell, Malay vassalage shifted temporarily to the Mon kingdoms of Thaton (in today's Myanmar) n Dvavaravati (in today's Thailand), before the Langkasukan kingdoms eventually came under continuously varying degrees of Srivijayan/Sailendran influence. That would have provided the openings for peninsular-islandic cultural exchanges.
Bhaskara
Do you have any vids and/or pics of Malay Menora and Mak Yong?
HangPC2
Joget Tari Lenggang (Joget Pahang)


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vc-PwW7dUe4
HangPC2
QUOTE(Bhaskara @ Apr 8 2008, 09:41 AM) [snapback]3621632[/snapback]
Do you have any vids and/or pics of Malay Menora and Mak Yong?




Mak Yong



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Qb2K5MgRJg



Malaysian Dances



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2tl6rIbmKM
Bhaskara
QUOTE(HangPC2 @ Apr 8 2008, 01:59 PM) [snapback]3622282[/snapback]

Thanks! The Mal Yong dance seems really interesting, I wish they came with subtitles embarassedlaugh.gif
The video of compilation of Malaysian Dances is a crap, though. The video maker doesn't even know how our gong looks like, he/she put up a pic of Northeastern gong instead thumbsdown.gif . Plus, I could've sworn that tune used in the video is a Javanese gamelan music.
Esfandiari
QUOTE(Bhaskara @ Apr 4 2008, 08:48 PM) [snapback]3615503[/snapback]
So there are becas in Malaysia too, huh? embarassedlaugh.gif I didn't know that.


Becas are practically extinct in Malaysia...except may be in my hometown of Alor Star, Georgetown (Pulau Pinang), Kota Bharu (Kelantan) or in Kuala Terengganu (Terengganu) but even in these places they are so few that that you don't need all your fingers to count them. No becas in Kuala Lumpur as far as I can see. Why you ask? You're interested in becas? Becas were plentiful, even in Singapore, when P Ramlee was young but most of us weren't born yet then!

Do you still have becas in Jakarta or other Indonesian cities? Sorry to deviate from 'Tarian' to 'becas'!! But you started it first!! Do we have something call 'Tarian Beca'??
Esfandiari
How about Joget? In Kedah, berjoget is also called bergencok! Joget is said to brougth to SE Asia by the Portuguese when they conquered Melaka. This is an article about Joget, from:

http://www.dancemalaysia.com/Dance/Traditi...Joget/joget.htm

The Joget is the most popular traditional dance throughout Malaysia.

It is performed at cultural festivals, wedding celebrations and other social functions.

The Joget's origin has been traced back and associated with a Portuguese for dance which was introduced to Malacca during the era of the spice trade.

The Joget is a couple dance and the tempo is fairly quick with the a feeling of teasing and playing between the partners.

In Malacca it is better known as Chakunchak.

This possibly refers to the rhythm of the movements of the feet in Joget where there is transference of weight to the beat 1& 2, rather similar to a ‘step ball change’ in Western dance.

This is sometimes called a ‘double step’.

A simplified version or sometimes referred to as the ‘single step’ includes the transfer of weight or ‘ball change’ but with just a tap of the second foot.


Esfandiari
Will this be considered Joget?? Or can we do the joget to it?? Hahahahaa!! Just kidding!! Akemi Ishii doing the lambada!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1popwWI546I
Esfandiari
How about ramvong? It was popular in Kedah when I was a kid. I understand it originates from Thailand or least it spread to Kedah from Thailand.

HangPC2
Tarian Tradisional Melayu




* Tarian Asli
* Tarian Asyik
* Tarian Ayam Didik
* Tarian Balai
* Tarian Barongan
* Tarian Calok (Sumpah-Sumpah)
* Tarian Ceracap Inai
* Tarian Cik Siti Wau Bulan
* Tarian Cinta Sayang
* Tarian Dabus
* Tarian Gayong Otar
* Tarian Hadrah
* Tarian Hala
* Tarian Ikan
* Tarian Inang
* Tarian Jala Ikan
* Tarian Joget
* Tarian Kuda Kepang
* Tarian Labi-Labi
* Tarian Lagu Anak Indung
* Tarian Lesung Indik Beras Bertampi
* Tarian Lilin
* Tarian Mak Inang
* Tarian Masri Kercing
* Tarian Pelanduk
* Tarian Piring
* Tarian Randai
* Tarian Saba
* Tarian Sarah
* Tarian Sewang
* Tarian Siti Payung
* Tarian Tempurung
* Tarian Upih
* Tarian Zapin
* Tarian Zapin Arab
* Tarian Zapin Johor
* Tarian Zapin Lenga
* Tarian Zapin Pekan
* Tarian Zapin Tenglu
Esfandiari
QUOTE(HangPC2 @ Apr 8 2008, 09:29 AM) [snapback]3622713[/snapback]
Tarian Tradisional Melayu
* Tarian Asli
* Tarian Asyik
* Tarian Ayam Didik
* Tarian Balai
* Tarian Barongan
* Tarian Calok (Sumpah-Sumpah)
* Tarian Ceracap Inai
* Tarian Cik Siti Wau Bulan
* Tarian Cinta Sayang
* Tarian Dabus
* Tarian Gayong Otar
* Tarian Hadrah
* Tarian Hala
* Tarian Ikan
* Tarian Inang
* Tarian Jala Ikan
* Tarian Joget
* Tarian Kuda Kepang
* Tarian Labi-Labi
* Tarian Lagu Anak Indung
* Tarian Lesung Indik Beras Bertampi
* Tarian Lilin
* Tarian Mak Inang
* Tarian Masri Kercing
* Tarian Pelanduk
* Tarian Piring
* Tarian Randai
* Tarian Saba
* Tarian Sarah
* Tarian Sewang
* Tarian Siti Payung
* Tarian Tempurung
* Tarian Upih
* Tarian Zapin
* Tarian Zapin Arab
* Tarian Zapin Johor
* Tarian Zapin Lenga
* Tarian Zapin Pekan
* Tarian Zapin Tenglu


Wow! HangPC, this is a long list of Malay 'tarians'! Gee! I don't know that we have that many! Wow! We're quite culturally rich! We should be proud, we should promote them nationwide as much as we can as well as internationally. These tarians/dances should be promoted in schools, colleges, universities and at our foreign missions..
Bhaskara
QUOTE(Esfandiari @ Apr 8 2008, 07:55 PM) [snapback]3622574[/snapback]
Becas are practically extinct in Malaysia...except may be in my hometown of Alor Star, Georgetown (Pulau Pinang), Kota Bharu (Kelantan) or in Kuala Terengganu (Terengganu) but even in these places they are so few that that you don't need all your fingers to count them. No becas in Kuala Lumpur as far as I can see. Why you ask? You're interested in becas? Becas were plentiful, even in Singapore, when P Ramlee was young but most of us weren't born yet then!

Do you still have becas in Jakarta or other Indonesian cities? Sorry to deviate from 'Tarian' to 'becas'!! But you started it first!! Do we have something call 'Tarian Beca'??

Becaks are forbidden in Jakarta and some other urban areas.

Tell me about this "joget". What is the definition of a "joget", what makes it different from other types of dance?
dreamhunter
Asyik and Terinai Dance

Azanin Ahmad, the leading exponent of contemporary Malay dance today, has said, "When asked about Malay classical dance, people always describe it as in the middle between Thai and Jawanese court dances. But in fact it has its own style which we could refer to as present day Kelantan-Pattani".

Asyik and Terinai fall in the category of pure dance, as opposed to the theatrical dance of Menora and Mak Yong. Asyik is a classical court dance believed to have originated in the Pattani court of Ratu Kuning in the 17th century. The Tales of Pattani depict it as twelve court maidens who dance and sing, while Peter Flores in 1612 described Asyik as a dance of eleven dancers. Perhaps the eleven dancers consisted of ten performers who danced and sang with one Puteri Asyik and one singer. The main part of Asyik dance consists of kneeling and sitting positions with movements depicting animals and their surroundings: ocean waves undulating, birds flying, fish swimming, elephants parading, and so forth. Some movements are similar to Mak Yong dance theatre. Asyik was normally performed by teenage girls of the court.

Azanin Ahmad utilised Asyik in her dance drama Puteri Saadong in 1980. In 1990 she was asked by the Kelantan Royal House to restore the authentic Asyik dance performed by teenage girls of the court for performances to be held in Kuala Lumpur, Singapore and Bangkok, as female dancing is banned by the Islamic government in Kelantan. The Ministry of Arts, Culture and Tourism jazzed up the repertoire to gain popularity as classical Asyik dance is extremely slow and elegant, normally performed for queens and kings. Dancers dress in 'berkemban' mode, i.e. wrapped in cloth from chest to thigh, with another piece of sarong underneath, a belt buckle on top and a little crown called Pemeles.

Terinai is another form of court dance in Perlis, north of Kedah and Kelantan. Though Terinai or Tari Inai is a court dance, it is less frequently performed compared to Asyik. It is only staged for very special occasions such as royal weddings and coronations. Tari means dance and Inai means the orange coloured herbs painted on fingernails, worn by the bride and groom a few days before the night of the wedding ceremony. This dance, because of its ceremonial nature, involves complex finger and hand movements in a continuous dance circle. It is a combination of dance forms found in Mak Yong, Silat and acrobatic postures called Meliuk, in which the dancers bend the body backward while standing with face looking down to the floor. In the past, this dance was performed by two men. The last male performer in Kelantan was injured in an accident, and now his daughter continues it. The last male Terinai dancer of Perlis died a few years ago.

As in the case of Mak Yong and Menora, Asyik and Terinai are also unique in having no counterpart in other parts of Malaysia.

Bhaskara
^Really interesting, reading it makes me want to have a see. Got any video of them?
AwangPembela
Wow! Just reading about Asyik was enough to get me 'asyik' thinking of just one thing. He he he.

Excuse me, but a dance extremely slow and elegant, danced by teenage girls clothed only from chest to thigh?

Now then, if that ain't the ultimate titillation, I don't know what is.

So now, can anyone tell me what I have to do to become a prince? icon_neutral.gif
Bhaskara
QUOTE(AwangPembela @ Apr 10 2008, 03:15 PM) [snapback]3627272[/snapback]
Wow! Just reading about Asyik was enough to get me 'asyik' thinking of just one thing. He he he.

Excuse me, but a dance extremely slow and elegant, danced by teenage girls clothed only from chest to thigh?

Now then, if that ain't the ultimate titillation, I don't know what is.

So now, can anyone tell me what I have to do to become a prince? icon_neutral.gif

^Horny pedophile embarassedlaugh.gif
I didn't know such dance with revealing costume exists in Malaysia. Pics please. Preferably of women doing the dance, and not some kids who Awang would drool on embarassedlaugh.gif
Esfandiari
QUOTE(Bhaskara @ Apr 8 2008, 08:41 PM) [snapback]3624004[/snapback]
Becaks are forbidden in Jakarta and some other urban areas.

Tell me about this "joget". What is the definition of a "joget", what makes it different from other types of dance?


From my research, actually JOGET is one of the four genres of traditional Malay tarians (dances) of Malaysia. This means that all Malay tarians in Malaysia, from A to Z, fall under any of these 4 genres, so some of these tarians are Joget. The other 3 genres are ASLI, INANG and ZAPIN. So, all our traditional Malay tarians are either Inangs or Aslis or Zapins or Jogets.

These 4 genres again are subdivided into two main categories: the endemic genres and the exotic genres. The endemic genres are original genres that originate from ethnic Malay lands which cut across today's modern nation states, so endemic genres originate from Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Singapore, Riau Islands and Borneo. The exotic genres are non-original genres that originate from outside of the ethnic Malay lands, more defined as from outside of the Malay world, so these genres originate from India, Persia, Arabia, China, Thailand or from anywhere outside of Malay world.

ASLI and INANG are considered endemic genres, both originating from Malay lands. ZAPIN and JOGET are exotic genres, originating from outside of Malay lands.

JOGET is also called RONGGENG. It was introduced to Malays in Melaka by the Portuguese during the 16th century. Its origins are traced to two Portuguese folk dances, the Branjo and Farrapeira. It is now popular throughout the Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, the Riau Islands and Borneo. There are many types of Joget, HangPC2 has furnished a list of these Joget tarians..
AwangPembela
QUOTE(Bhaskara @ Apr 11 2008, 09:04 PM) [snapback]3631066[/snapback]
^Horny pedophile embarassedlaugh.gif
I didn't know such dance with revealing costume exists in Malaysia. Pics please. Preferably of women doing the dance, and not some kids who Awang would drool on embarassedlaugh.gif


Ha ha ha. But I won't touch a girl below the statutory age. Too troublesome. biggthumpup.gif

You prolly won't see it in 2008 Kelantan. It's all history now. Until BN returns to power there, perhaps.
swingdoctor
QUOTE(Esfandiari @ Apr 8 2008, 08:08 AM) [snapback]3622596[/snapback]
How about Joget? In Kedah, berjoget is also called bergencok! Joget is said to brougth to SE Asia by the Portuguese when they conquered Melaka. This is an article about Joget, from:

http://www.dancemalaysia.com/Dance/Traditi...Joget/joget.htm

The Joget is the most popular traditional dance throughout Malaysia.

It is performed at cultural festivals, wedding celebrations and other social functions.

The Joget's origin has been traced back and associated with a Portuguese for dance which was introduced to Malacca during the era of the spice trade.

The Joget is a couple dance and the tempo is fairly quick with the a feeling of teasing and playing between the partners.

In Malacca it is better known as Chakunchak.

This possibly refers to the rhythm of the movements of the feet in Joget where there is transference of weight to the beat 1& 2, rather similar to a ‘step ball change’ in Western dance.

This is sometimes called a ‘double step’.

A simplified version or sometimes referred to as the ‘single step’ includes the transfer of weight or ‘ball change’ but with just a tap of the second foot.


As my name suggests I like to swing dance also known as the lindy hop, actually I like most forms of couple dance that involve lead and follow and connection between the couple. I didn't realise that joget was associated with a Portugese dance and neither did I realise that the footwork was similar to "Western" dances. Does joget involve lead and follow as in does one partner's movements influence another and are there "rules" as to how this lead and follow works? How popular is joget among the younger populatiuon? In swing as in most other "western" dances that I have been exposed to, the "kick/step ball change" occurs on beat 3&4 and 7&8. But dance is an expression of the music one is dancing to and I guess the difference between joget and swing footwork reflects the different style of music that they are danced to. And I agree that dancing is like flirting between partners embarassedlaugh.gif .
Bhaskara
QUOTE(AwangPembela @ Apr 12 2008, 11:02 PM) [snapback]3632103[/snapback]
Ha ha ha. But I won't touch a girl below the statutory age. Too troublesome. biggthumpup.gif

You prolly won't see it in 2008 Kelantan. It's all history now. Until BN returns to power there, perhaps.

Because Kelantanese people are strong adherents to Islamic values? That's too bad.... couldn't they just modify it, or perform it outside of the state or something? There must be some compromises made to save this heritage... icon_sad.gif

QUOTE(swingdoctor @ Apr 14 2008, 09:08 PM) [snapback]3636368[/snapback]
As my name suggests I like to swing dance also known as the lindy hop, actually I like most forms of couple dance that involve lead and follow and connection between the couple. I didn't realise that joget was associated with a Portugese dance and neither did I realise that the footwork was similar to "Western" dances. Does joget involve lead and follow as in does one partner's movements influence another and are there "rules" as to how this lead and follow works? How popular is joget among the younger populatiuon? In swing as in most other "western" dances that I have been exposed to, the "kick/step ball change" occurs on beat 3&4 and 7&8. But dance is an expression of the music one is dancing to and I guess the difference between joget and swing footwork reflects the different style of music that they are danced to. And I agree that dancing is like flirting between partners embarassedlaugh.gif .

I didn't know that it has western influence either! News for me
HangPC2
QUOTE(Bhaskara @ Apr 15 2008, 03:03 PM) [snapback]3638123[/snapback]
Because Kelantanese people are strong adherents to Islamic values? That's too bad.... couldn't they just modify it, or perform it outside of the state or something? There must be some compromises made to save this heritage...




OK aper !, biggthumpup.gif apasal dah gatal ker ? embarassedlaugh.gif
Bhaskara
What do you mean? sure.gif I was just suggesting some alternatives so that your country's rich heritage won't go down the drain. What is wrong with that?
dreamhunter
I don't know. But I do think Malay Islamists sometimes go overboard in these kind of things, with the tendency to INDISCRIMINATELY jettison anything n everything cultural that they suspect or accuse of being un-Islamic.

But that ain't done by our Muslim counterpars in the Arabic, Iranian, Turkic n other lands. They seem to have no problem accommodating their past un-Islamic culture as part of their ancient history.

You still see vestiges of ancient pharaonic culture in Masr (Egypt), Orthodox Christian culture in Turkey (the headquarters of the Eastern Christian Orthodox Church is still in Istanbul, which might surprise many Malaysian Muslims), n ancient Zaratushthra (Zoroastrian) culture in Iran, preserved as heritages of their ancient history.
Bhaskara
I know! Some even use belly dance as their main tourist attraction, when obviously it's against Islamic values.
AwangPembela
Well, ya cant stop a randy Arab from havin his fun. If he cant get it in Cairo he'll go to Athens, or Moscow. embarassedlaugh.gif
Bhaskara
I've found this video!
http://youtube.com/watch?v=i1lZvQlMzgY
Is this the "Tarian Asyik" that you guys were talking about?
kelantanese
yea that one.
Bhaskara
Cool! A real Kelantanese!
I really love the dance, it's simply ethereal! biggthumpup.gif
Very graceful and classy too..... I didn't know Malaysia such an amazing heritage!

How about that Tarian Asli, issit something like this one?
http://youtube.com/watch?v=IfW9d6GMGt8&feature=related
kelantanese
bout tarian asli that u post, im not sure bout the tarian, bout the music it's different from other kelantan traditional music, u can see that its different with other kelantan traditional music such as dikir barat, main puteri, tarian asyik, etc. which the style of music its almost the same.
Bhaskara
QUOTE(kelantanese @ Apr 17 2008, 11:28 PM) [snapback]3643778[/snapback]
bout tarian asli that u post, im not sure bout the tarian, bout the music it's different from other kelantan traditional music, u can see that its different with other kelantan traditional music such as dikir barat, main puteri, tarian asyik, etc. which the style of music its almost the same.

That's what I thought, that's why I asked because to me both the dance and the music in that video doesn't sound very "asli" to me, instead, it's very similar to Zapin icon_neutral.gif
AwangPembela
QUOTE(Bhaskara @ Apr 17 2008, 01:49 AM) [snapback]3643167[/snapback]
I've found this video!
http://youtube.com/watch?v=i1lZvQlMzgY
Is this the "Tarian Asyik" that you guys were talking about?


If it made you 'asyik', then that's the one. beerchug.gif
AwangPembela
QUOTE(Bhaskara @ Apr 17 2008, 05:33 AM) [snapback]3643350[/snapback]
Cool! A real Kelantanese!
I really love the dance, it's simply ethereal! biggthumpup.gif
Very graceful and classy too..... I didn't know Malaysia such an amazing heritage!


If a hot, young, beautful Asyik dancer would care to come dance on my lap, it would be even more ethereal. embarassedlaugh.gif
Bhaskara
QUOTE(AwangPembela @ Apr 18 2008, 12:18 PM) [snapback]3645520[/snapback]
If a hot, young, beautful Asyik dancer would care to come dance on my lap, it would be even more ethereal. embarassedlaugh.gif

Gee, thanks. Nothing is more fun than an old pervert ruining it all for the rest of us sure.gif
You must be one of those guys who went to an all-male boarding school and enjoyed the homoerotic feeling so much you try to make it up by saying lewd things about women icon_neutral.gif
Here is a safe dance for you, then:
http://youtube.com/watch?v=77NdMrrx5Q0
Dikir Barat
kelantanese
hahahaha agree on that. hahahaha
jemekelate
dikir barat is pretty new actually, not as old as the court dances(makyong, asyik). People say it is invented in the early 1900. Even the creator of the famous song Wau Bulan, Seman Wau Bulan had just passed away recently.
Bhaskara
Ah, I see... that explains everything. Thanks for the info, jemekelate!
AwangPembela
Cmon, dont be so serious.

A bit of lewd once in a while, wont do anyone any harm.
AwangPembela
It's not like we're all pure, asexual, pious, lustless monks then, is it?

Even monks have been seen to drool at beautiful young wimmen sometimes.

It's just human nature, leh.
Bhaskara
But there's no need to show it in a vulgar way icon_neutral.gif
dreamhunter
Go on, Bhasky. Don't be too sensitive.

He's just being the good lad that he is. Like the man said, "You can't keep a good man down." biggthumpup.gif
AwangPembela
This aint about dance. But since it's cultural/histrocial, perhaps someone might still be interested:

A Thai movie entitled Queen of Pattani or Queen of Lung Gasuka directed by Nonzee Nimibutr, loosely based on a south Pattani myth will be released in 2008.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nonzee_Nimibutr

Nonzee Nimibutr (Thai นนทรีย์ นิมิบุตร, born in 1962 in Nonthaburi Province, Thailand) is a Thai film director, film producer and screenwriter. Best known for his ghost thriller, Nang Nak, he is generally credited as the leader among a "New Wave" of Thai filmmakers that also includes Pen-Ek Ratanaruang, Wisit Sasanatieng and Apichatpong Weerasethakul.

Nonzee's next project, Queen of Langkasuka, is an epic historical-fantasy involving pirates and three princesses who must protect their realm, Langkasuka. The film was originally to be called Queens of Pattani, but the name was changed to avoid possible political overtones stemming from the South Thailand insurgency and Pattani separatism.[2] Shooting began in August 2006 and the film is to star Ananda Everingham from Shutter and Dan Chupong from Kerd ma lui. [3]

Bhaskara
Oh yeah, I've been waiting for this movie. It's very interesting to see the history of that part of Thailand! The ladies' costumes are very beautiful too. I'm just not sure about the costume of the men, I think they are too modern for that time. I think that would be the costumes worn in Islamic time icon_neutral.gif
dreamhunter
QUOTE(Bhaskara @ Apr 27 2008, 10:20 PM) [snapback]3665614[/snapback]
Oh yeah, I've been waiting for this movie. It's very interesting to see the history of that part of Thailand! The ladies' costumes are very beautiful too. I'm just not sure about the costume of the men, I think they are too modern for that time. I think that would be the costumes worn in Islamic time icon_neutral.gif


Very interesting for me too.

Yes. To see that part of Thailand - the part that used to be a sovereign, independent Malay kingdom that was invaded n conquered by imperialist, expansionist Thais.

Seems that they still couldn't get their fill after having previously invaded n conquered so many Khmer kingdoms.
PerisaiLangkasuka
Just thought some of you guys might be interested:

http://www.rockmekong.org/media-cov/News2002/queens.htm

THE RAJAS IJAU, Biru and Ungu, who ruled Pattani from 1584 to 1635, were named after the colours of the rainbow - Ijau means green, Biru is blue and Ungu is violet. The three sisters were followed on the thrown by Ungu's daughter Kuning; together they oversaw an unprecedented era of prosperity for the southern kingdom.

The Queens of Pattani

If stories give life to a place, those of the four queens of Pattani recall laughter and tears, love and revenge that shaped a chatpter of the little known history of this Islamic maritime kingdom about sex centuries ago. Subhatra Bhumiprabhas and Natiya Tangwisutijit trace the facinating story of the queens

Nobody knows what Princess Ijau might have thought when she ascended the throne as the first queen of Pattani in 1584.

After the death of her father, Sultan Manzur Syah, in 1572, Ijau and her two younger sisters had to endure 12 traumatic years witnessing brothers and cousins killing one another in their battle for the throne. The conflict was resolved when all of the male heirs were assassinated, paving the way for Ijau's ascension.

Today's historians - and, indeed, ancient European traders and travellers who arrived in the Islamic kingdom - had different views about Pattani's century-long rule by women. Some opinions appear more favourable than others. But the predominant conclusion was that Queen Ijau and her sisters who succeeded to the throne were no more than puppet monarchs. Behind them must have been capable male ministers who governed in her name without the queens' actual participation.

French traveller Nicholas Gervaise, for example, wrote in the 1680s that Raja Ijau was not allowed to enter at all into the secrets of state affairs.

"[The queen] had to content herself with the respect and homage which everyone formally rendered her as their sovereign," Gervaise was quoted in "Hikayat Pattani", a classic Malay account of the history of this Islamic kingdom.

"They [the ministers] did not allow her the freedom to choose her own high officials, but they never refused her anything which could contribute to her pleasure," he wrote.

Such a view, however, could not properly explain why under the rule of the queens, especially the first two, Pattani reached its greatest prosperity from maritime trade with Europe, Japan and around Southeast Asia. Prices for commodities, particularly foodstuffs, were at an all time low, pleasing the rich and poor under their reigns alike. Farmers were also recorded to have enjoyed irrigation projects initiated and supervised by the queens.

If they were just puppets, how did the three sisters succeed one another in a row? The youngest sister even managed to have her daughter become queen as well. They all survived several coup attempts amid a fluctuating political situation in the region. All the men who challenged their power were "dealt with" in different ways. Nobody knows what actually happened to them, but they were never seen again.

Reading between the lines, scattered historical accounts suggest the queens were capable rulers who knew how to play both internal and regional politics. In other words, the ancient kingdom of Pattani prospered "because of", and not "in spite of", the queens.

The three sisters - Ijau, Biru and Ungu - succeeded one another from 1584 to 1635. Their father named them after the colours of the rainbow - Ijau means green, Biru is blue and Ungu is violet. Whether the rainbow connotation was intended as a good omen, the princesses did have a shining future - they all made their way to the prestigious throne without much struggle.

Raja Ijau ruled for 31 years before she died, and passed the throne to her second sister Biru, who led the kingdom for seven years. The throne then passed to the third sister, Ungu, who reigned for 12 years.

Among them, Ungu was the only one married. Her sister Ijau made her the bride of Sultan Abdul-Ghafur Mohaidin Syah of Pahang, another influential kingdom on the Malay Peninsula. Princess Ungu gave birth to a charming daughter, Kuning, who succeeded her mother as the monarch. She reigned for about 50 years in what was one of the wealthiest and longest reigns for the region.

Perhaps Raja Ijau's understanding of regional politics was deeper than her ministers might have realised. She had Princess Ungu marry the sultan of Pahang, given the close connections between Pahang and Johore at the time, and also tightened relations with Johore, another strong political centre on the peninsula.

In retrospect, Raja Ijau turned to concentrate on strengthening relations with neighbouring kingdoms because Pattani became relatively independent from the influence of Ayutthaya, the powerful inland kingdom. Ayutthaya, from 1564 to the 1590s, was struggling for its own survival against Burma and Cambodia.

Secure politics entailed economic prosperity. Pattani itself was among the best natural harbours along the lengthy east coast of the Malay peninsula. The mid-sized kingdom enjoyed long-distance trade with China and India, as well as localised trade with Siam, Malaya and Indonesia. It served as an entrepot to which pepper could be brought from the neighbouring lands for Chinese merchants in return for luxury textiles and porcelain. At the same time Indian textiles were brought to Pattani in exchange for gold, spices and foodstuffs.

Raja Ungu knew her marriage to the sultan of Pahang was to secure political and economic prosperity for Pattani. Love was not a part of it. To her, the marriage was for the "love for her land". Her situation was not much different from other women of other kingdoms in the region in the same period. Their parents sent them as "gifts" for rulers of kingdoms they wanted to make friends with for their protection or other security purposes.

However, what was different for Ungu was that she returned to Pattani and became queen after Raja Biru passed away. Her daughter, Kuning, followed in her footstep decades later by marrying into politics and for the love of her motherland.

Raja Ijau died in 1616 and was succeeded by Raja Biru. It was Raja Biru who sent her ministers to Pahang to request the return of Queen Ungu after she became a widow when Sultan Abdul-Ghafur Mohaidin Syah died. Ungu also brought with her Princess Kuning, who was then four years old.

Princess Kuning was only 12-years-old when her monarch aunt Raja Biru arranged her marriage to a nobleman from Siam, Okya Decho, a son of the ruler of Ligor, or Nakhon Si Thammarat, who served the king of Ayutthaya. By the end of the 16th century, Ayutthaya's power was on the rise again during the reign of King Naresuan.

At the time, no one could read the heart of Princess Ungu, who watched her daughter's wedding in silence.

Soon after Raja Biru died, however, Raja Ungu, who succeeded her sister in 1624, arranged for her daughter to be remarried to the Sultan of Johore. Indeed, Pattani under the reign of Ungu adopted an anti-Siam policy. Unlike her two predecessors, Ungu refused to allow herself to be called by the Siamese royal title Phra Chao.

Perhaps, Okya Decho would not have asked to return to Nakhon Si Thammarat had he known he would not be allowed to take his young wife with him.

When informed of the new wedding of his wife, a furious Okya Decho asked for permission from the king of Siam to lead Siamese troops to attack Pattani. To aid her defence, Ungu received support from her late husband's state, Pahang, and the Sultan of Johore also led his troops to help his mother-in-law. The Siamese troops weren't familiar with sea warfare. The week-long war ended with the heart-broken Okya Decho returning home empty handed.

The love story of Princess Kuning didn't end there, but continued dramatically until her last breath. Raja Ungu died in 1635 and Kuning succeeded her mother to the Pattani throne. After the funeral ceremony, Kuning's husband left Pattani for his homeland. The sultan asked his younger brother and his mother to stay in Pattani to guard Kuning from her ex-husband Okya Decho.

But the sultan had left the fish with the cat. The prince of Johore went too far from the role of protector. The Malay historical account of Hikayat Pattani stated that the prince "violated" Kuning. However, the prince did not seem to have Kuning's heart for long. Raja Kuning found her lover had committed adultery with a court singer. The prince of Johore appeared to be madly in love with the singer whom he planned to give a royal title.

However, many ministers and the people took the queen's side. They volunteered to "deal" with the problem for her. Raja Kuning only asked her men to spare the prince's life. The prince was never seen in Pattani again. He safely returned to Johore while the prince's mother and their people were later escorted by the queen's men to their homeland as well.

No matter how chaotic her personal life, Raja Kuning never forgot her duty as the ruler of Pattani. During her reign, Pattani returned to the glorious era of international trade. The queen ordered her men to expand the mouth of the Pattani River and to dredge the river's tideway to welcome an increasing number of cargo barges. The bay of Pattani shone with lights from trader junks day and night. The Hikayat Pattani noted that the last queen didn't live on royal revenues, she made her income from the crops in her own gardens, feeding and clothing herself from the profits on the flowers and vegetables. Moreover, she turned her personal possessions into royal property.

Unlike her mother, who was hostile to Ayutthaya, Raja Kuning decided to make friends with the larger kingdom by paying a visit in 1641. The queen of Pattani was welcomed by King Prasat Thong of Siam. They re-established relations and Siam promised to end its interference in Pattani, at least during the reign of Raja Kuning.

A decade later, nonetheless, Kuning was forced to leave the throne by Raja Sakti of Kalantan who staged a coup in 1651 after she failed to handle the internal conflict between the sultan and another prince. On her way to seek refuge in Johore, the last queen of Pattani died near the shore of Kalantan. Her body was buried in a small village called Kampung Pancor.

The queen's laughter and tears and her "love for the land" was also buried there.

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