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furansizuka
As usual, the tradition continues beerchug.gif

Track back links:
Thread of Indonesian Movies 2009
http://www.asiafinest.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=188259

Thread of Indonesian Movies 2008
http://www.asiafinest.com/forum/index.php?...=0&start=0#

Thread of Indonesian Movies 2007
http://www.asiafinest.com/forum/index.php?...t=0&start=0

Thread of Indonesian Movies 2006
http://www.asiafinest.com/forum/index.php?...=59992&st=0

Thread of Indonesian Movies 2005
http://www.asiafinest.com/forum/index.php?...ndonesian+Movie


Before moving on, let's give big applause to these films for their achievements:

1. Blind Pig Who Wants to Fly/Babi Buta Yang Ingin Terbang won prestigious FIPRESCI AWARD at the International Film Festival Rotterdam 2009 and Special Award NETPAC at the 2009 Golden Horse Awards Taiwan
2. Three Wishes Three Prayes/3 Doa 3 Cinta got Special Jury Prize at the Vesoul International Film Festival 2009 in France
3. Mengejar Ombak/Chasing Waves won 2 awards at the 2009 X-Dance Festival Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
4. Laskar Pelangi/Rainbow Troops won Best Film at the 2009 Asia Pacific Film Festival Taiwan, Best Editing and SIGNIS award at the 2009 Asian Film Awards Hong Kong, and 2009 Golden Butterfly Award at the International Festival of Films for Children And Young Adults in Iran
5. Pintu Terlarang/Forbidden Door won Best Film/Best Picture of the Year at Puchon International Fantastic Film Festival 2009 Korea
6. Macabre/Rumah Dara won Best Actress (Shareefa Danish) at Puchon International Fantastic Film Festival 2009 Korea
7. Perempuan Berkalung Sorban/Woman With A Turban won Best Supporting Actress (Widyawati) at the 2009 Asia Pacific Film Festival Taiwan
8. Jamilah And The President won Best Sound/Music at the 2009 Asia Pacific Film Festival Taiwan, NETPAC award at 2009 Asiatica Film Mediale Festival Rome Italy, and also Indonesia's entry for 2011 Oscar best foreign language category
9. Jermal/Fishing Platform won Grandprize at India International Film Festival 2009

Also taking critical notes are the first Indonesian colossal war film Merah Putih, the revival of martial art film Merantau, and the first musical animated movie Meraih Mimpi (Sing to the Dawn) which most peeps thought was made in Singapore (but not!). They got lots of attention and praise. Especially for Merantau, festival critics out there weigh in on this film biggthumpup.gif

Now let the good times roll!
Ralf
Thanks for the start of the new thread and the round-up of significant movies.

But I'm with heartshapedbox in saying that Sammaria Simanjuntak's debut feature film cin(T)a really struck me as the best Indonesian film in recent years.
It certainly is the most audacious debut I have seen since Welles' Citizen Kane.
Sammaria and friends have crafted a film where the screenplay, cinematography, and other elements come together in way that is harmonious and yet strikingly original.
Indonesian films with "cinta" in the title abound, and the theme of inter-religious/inter-racial love may have been covered on both the big and small screens many times,
but the treatment here is unique within Indonesia, and more like the style of 1960s French New Wave Cinema. The leading lady even reminds me of Goddard's Anna Karina.
cin(T)a is almost a "short film", running at only 1hr 14min, but that helps it to stay focused on its main theme, rather than straying into typical romantic melodrama.
It was really a pleasure to watch. The characters are engaging, without being too familiar, and the screenplay is full of life and the dialogue is absolutely sparkling.
With a such a small cast, the two characters played by Sunny Soon and Saira Jihan must carry the whole film, and under the guidance of Sammaria, they carry the film perfectly.
I am sure we will continue to see quality film work from actor Sunny Soon, director Sammaria, and all the creative people involved in this movie.
It is heartening to see that low-budget indie films like this can rival and surpass the stuff churned out by the big studios.
Cheers to Sammaria and Sally Anom Sari for writing a story that challenges the Indonesian audience to think outside the square, and still gives everyone a thoroughly enjoyable movie.

cin(T)a movie trailer and IFF press release.



Sammaria in Melbourne at IFF2009. Sammaria in Melbourne with the Rumah Dara crew.Who stole my drink ?
furansizuka
Jamila And The President wins two film festival honors in France beerchug.gif

The Jakarta Post | Fri, 02/05/2010 9:59 AM

Indonesian film Jamila dan Sang Presiden (Jamila and the President), written and directed by woman activist Ratna Sarumpaet, has won two honors at the Asian Film Festival in Vesoul, France.

The film was rated the best in two competition categories, namely the Prix de Public and the Prix Jury Lyceen, according to Gita L Murti, a social and cultural affairs official at the Indonesian Embassy in Paris in a statement to Antara state news agency in London on Thursday.

Jamila, screened at a number of international film festivals in Bangkok, Hong Kong and Australia, highlights the issues of poverty and underage sex trafficking in Indonesia.

Last year, the movie won a NETPAC Award at the Asiatica Film Mediale festival organized in Rome, Italy.

The movie has also been selected to represent Indonesia in the foreign language category, competing for the Oscar with movies from 64 other countries.
furansizuka
Cut Mini wins Best Actress award at Brussels Film Festival (for her teacher role in Laskar Pelangi) beerchug.gif


Actress Cut Mini said she was over the moon when she found out she had been named Best Actress at the Brussels Film Festival.

The 36-year-old received an SMS from film director and producer Mira Lesmana informing her she had received the award for her role in Laskar Pelangi (Rainbow Warriors), where she plays a passionate teacher in a dilapidated school.

She happened to be dining with her pilates instructor when she heard the familiar sound of an SMS. “I immediately screamed and everyone looked at me,” she said.

Given she had never dreamed she would win an award in an overseas film festival, she said it was the one of the best days of her life.

“I didn’t expect this… I couldn’t speak when I first heard the news, I just cried,” she said on Tuesday.

“I mean… Who is this Cut Mini? I’m not as cool as actors from other countries. And I haven’t acted in many films,” she said.

She added she was very grateful for the praise she had received previously, after being crowned Best Actress last year at the Indonesian Movie Awards for the same role.

The adventure movie Laskar Pelangi is based on the best-selling Indonesian novel of the same title, written by Andrea Hirata. The novel recounts Hirata’s childhood through the story of an inspiring teacher and her 10 students in poverty-stricken Kampung Gantong in Belitong.

The Jakarta International Film Festival dubbed Laskar Pelangi — a big hit attracting 5 million viewers — “the highest grossing Indonesian box-office of all time”. Award-winning director Riri Riza released a sequel, Sang Pemimpi (The Dreamer), after directing Laskar Pelangi.

The Jakarta Post
heartshapedbox
QUOTE (Ralf @ Feb 6 2010, 07:43 PM) *
Thanks for the start of the new thread and the round-up of significant movies.

But I'm with heartshapedbox in saying that Sammaria Simanjuntak's debut feature film cin(T)a really struck me as the best Indonesian film in recent years.
It certainly is the most audacious debut I have seen since Welles' Citizen Kane.
Sammaria and friends have crafted a film where the screenplay, cinematography, and other elements come together in way that is harmonious and yet strikingly original.
Indonesian films with "cinta" in the title abound, and the theme of inter-religious/inter-racial love may have been covered on both the big and small screens many times,
but the treatment here is unique within Indonesia, and more like the style of 1960s French New Wave Cinema. The leading lady even reminds me of Goddard's Anna Karina.
cin(T)a is almost a "short film", running at only 1hr 14min, but that helps it to stay focused on its main theme, rather than straying into typical romantic melodrama.
It was really a pleasure to watch. The characters are engaging, without being too familiar, and the screenplay is full of life and the dialogue is absolutely sparkling.
With a such a small cast, the two characters played by Sunny Soon and Saira Jihan must carry the whole film, and under the guidance of Sammaria, they carry the film perfectly.
I am sure we will continue to see quality film work from actor Sunny Soon, director Sammaria, and all the creative people involved in this movie.
It is heartening to see that low-budget indie films like this can rival and surpass the stuff churned out by the big studios.
Cheers to Sammaria and Sally Anom Sari for writing a story that challenges the Indonesian audience to think outside the square, and still gives everyone a thoroughly enjoyable movie.

cin(T)a movie trailer and IFF press release.



agree with you, Ralf...
I've seen many good Indonesian movies...but Cin(t)a is the most outstanding (in my opinion)
after watching, for a while i thought, 'Was it really Indonesian film? becoz it was just too good!"
i love the smart conversation...it didn't judge what was wrong and right, it just asked....
but i hate the ending bawling.gif


heartshapedbox
Too bad, i had no time to see Jamila. It's a rare chance to see Christine Hakim being a villain. embarassedlaugh.gif
Was it a good movie, furan?

Congrats to Cut Mini.
She played very well. So when I saw her in Ponds ads, i couldn't believe she is the same woman in Laskar Pelangi
icon_wink.gif
Ralf
QUOTE (furansizuka @ Feb 7 2010, 04:34 PM) *
Jamila And The President wins two film festival honors in France beerchug.gif
The Jakarta Post | Fri, 02/05/2010 9:59 AM
Indonesian film Jamila dan Sang Presiden (Jamila and the President), written and directed by woman activist Ratna Sarumpaet, has won two honors at the Asian Film Festival in Vesoul, France.
The film was rated the best in two competition categories, namely the Prix de Public and the Prix Jury Lyceen, according to Gita L Murti, a social and cultural affairs official at the Indonesian Embassy in Paris in a statement to Antara state news agency in London on Thursday.
Jamila, screened at a number of international film festivals in Bangkok, Hong Kong and Australia, highlights the issues of poverty and underage sex trafficking in Indonesia.
Last year, the movie won a NETPAC Award at the Asiatica Film Mediale festival organized in Rome, Italy.
The movie has also been selected to represent Indonesia in the foreign language category, competing for the Oscar with movies from 64 other countries.
So much in the media about this film.... now I really want to see it.
Hope this film makes it to Hollywood and shows the world that there is such a thing as Indonesian Cinema.
At the same time it is good to see that Indonesian film makers have not been hung-up on Hollywood...... that is, they have been pursuing other avenues and international festivals.


QUOTE (furansizuka @ Feb 11 2010, 03:27 PM) *
Cut Mini wins Best Actress award at Brussels Film Festival (for her teacher role in Laskar Pelangi) beerchug.gif
Actress Cut Mini said she was over the moon when she found out she had been named Best Actress at the Brussels Film Festival.
The Jakarta Post
Congratulations Cut Mini beerchug.gif


QUOTE (heartshapedbox @ Feb 13 2010, 01:07 PM) *
agree with you, Ralf...
I've seen many good Indonesian movies...but Cin(t)a is the most outstanding (in my opinion)
after watching, for a while i thought, 'Was it really Indonesian film? becoz it was just too good!"
i love the smart conversation...it didn't judge what was wrong and right, it just asked....
but i hate the ending bawling.gif
I loved the ending because for one thing it leaves things open for contemplation and does not necessarily mean that their relationship is over.
Spoiler alert !
Also I loved the surprise with the "reality show/doco interview" twist at the end.
I love the 60s French New Wave-ish structure of the whole film, and in particular the ending, which really underscores everything that has preceded it.

With a bit more funding this film could have gone to the USA and knocked the dust and cobwebs off the Academy Awards boffins.
furansizuka
^ Now I want to see Cin(T)a badly! cry2.gif I hope I still can find the DVD in store >.<
Ralf
So I was hanging out with an Indonesian friend who has just arrived in Australia and the conversation turned to "how woefully bad are SE Asian TV shows".
But then again we have Indonesia's Metro TV collaborating with In Docs to bring us a bunch of refreshing new documentaries every year. biggthumpup.gif
It got widespread coverage in the Jakarta Post :

QUOTE
The Jakarta Post
Saturday, September 20, 2008
By Nauval Yazid

Think local TV is destroying our minds ?
Think again.
For every ton of nonsensical and overblown soaps, there are a handful of shows depicting real lives in a less extravagant manner.
In short, they are far cry from the staged and painstakingly scripted "reality" shows.

One place to look for these is in the Eagle Awards, an annual documentary competition for first-time filmmakers held by private news station Metro TV with In Docs (Indonesian Documentaries), an organization that aims to introduce and distribute the craft of the documentary genre to anyone with great filmmaking aspirations. If we have to single out a life-changing TV show addressing issues that have often caught both local and national governments off-guard, Eagle has more than what it takes to claim that label. The winning films in the past two years have brought wide attention to the disadvantages underprivileged people face in getting access to proper healthcare and education.

In 2006, Suster Apung (The Floating Nurse) profiled Nurse Rabiah, a lone fighter who attended to the sick in isolated areas of South Sulawesi using outdated medical tools and a heavily damaged boat unfit for the rough sea crossings needed to visit her patients.
Her story moved no one less than Vice President Jusuf Kalla to donate a better transportation system for her and medical equipment to support her noble and nonprofit service.

Last year's winner, Kepala Sekolahku Pemulung (My Headmaster: The Garbage Collector), touched and shocked many with its almost unthinkable story: A principal of a poor elementary school in Jakarta has a side job collecting garbage to make ends meet.
What happened since was an injection of financial aid from the education board in the Greater Jakarta Administration to save the school and the principal's life.

Given the spectrum of the competition's theme this year -- "Hijau Indonesiaku" (My Green Indonesia) -- it remains to be seen whether one or all of five finalists will have the same dramatic impact as the these winners from the past two years.
For what it's worth from the audience's point of view, the theme could not be more apparent in giving TV viewers something to root for -- panoramic scenes of nature and life, albeit the high-minded concerns underlying every film selected.

Bearing the most dramatic title of all, Prahara Tsunami Bertabur Bakau (Raising Mangroves After the Tsunami), directed by Emanuel Tome Hayon & Mikhael Yosviranto, tells the story of one Baba Akong who almost single-handedly championed planting mangroves after his village in Flores, East Nusa Tenggara, was completely destroyed by a tsunami in December 1992. After initial resistance from his fellow villagers, his persistence paid off: 23 acres of mangrove lands give the people a decent living, and Akong was recently nominated for the Kalpataru award in environmental pioneering earlier this year.

A slightly similar spirit of eco-entrepreneurship is evident in Pulau Bangka Menangis (The Crying Bangka Island), directed by Rudi Harlan and Nursubah from Bangka Belitung. The film follows the lives of two friends, Fatoni and Edy Elson, who both work in tin mines until they realize the tin quality in Bangka has gradually diminished to the extent it is almost nonexistent. While Edy remains faithful to his profession and keeps on digging and searching for new tin mines throughout the entire land, Fatoni quits his job and decides to plant rubber and palm trees in the land he previously mined. Despite their contrasting approaches, the two remain friends.

Two other films focus on ecological problems solved collectively rather than by individual efforts.
In Buah Yang Menunggu Mati (Fruit Awaits Its Death), directors Anom Bayu Santoso and Badrudin Kurniawan inspect the suspicious decline in the quality of apple plantations in Batu, East Java. Once hailed as the icon of the city, apples produced in Batu are facing their dying days as a result of excessive use of pesticide in past decades.

On a wider scope, Menjual Mimpi di Sambak (Selling Dreams in Sambak) observes residents of Sambak village in Magelang, Central Java, trying to preserve their main forest and prevent illegal logging by planting fruit trees throughout the forest and turning the forest into an eco-tourism destination.

The fifth finalist, Tanah Terakhir (The Last Land), directed by Rahmawati and Esti Asmalia, looks at the contrasting conditions between the big companies using the land along River Krio in West Kalimantan and the native residents whose lives have not been improved by the supposedly beneficial invasion. While the premise is stated clearly in the beginning, most of the film is dominated by a slightly out-of-place father-and-son story that takes a look at one father who puts all his efforts into the ownership of his lands, compared with his son's spoiled and irresponsible attitude.

Entertaining as it may be, we cannot help feeling the lack of focus in delivering what is supposedly a strong environment-related theme. This flaw can be found in all films to varying degrees, often compounded by a lack of emotional impact and coherent narrative lines that make the films easier to follow. Still, despite these minor points, these productions could not be more worth applauding, especially if we take into account that these are the directors' first forays into serious filmmaking, with limited time to do more coherent research on their subjects or to master the necessary technical skills during the production process. As honestly shared during the Eagle Awards' premiere screenings earlier this week in Erasmus Huis, the finalists come with various life backgrounds. Some of them had to quit their full-time jobs to dedicate their time to making the films, and others were left clueless when asked what kind of camera was used in making their films.

Amateur as they are right now, we can only be amazed by two things: That their subjects are already engaging and that, by delving into their offerings, we are glad that TV has made us think again.
furansizuka
Well I like 'Suster Terapung' biggthumpup.gif If I'm not mistaken it got 3rd place at Asian Television Awards for best doc. Anyways, here's interview with Edwin, the director of 'Blind Pig Who Wants to Fly' > LINK

In 2009, his unusual feature-length film debut, “Babi Buta Yang Ingin Terbang” (“Blind Pig Who Wants to Fly”), was screened at a number of international film festivals, including in Pusan, South Korea, Seattle in the United States and Thessaloniki, Greece.

The film has won the director numerous accolades. Edwin was the recipient of the Silver Montgolfiere and the Young Audience awards from the Festival of the Three Continents in Nantes, France.

He also received the Fipresci Award from the International Federation of Film Critics at the International Rotterdam Film Festival in the Netherlands.

While his name may not necessarily be mentioned in the same breath as other internationally acclaimed Indonesian film directors, like Riri Riza, Garin Nugroho and Nia Dinata, there is no question that Edwin is one of the rising stars of Indonesian cinema.
Ralf
Kepala Sekolahku Pemulung





Following on from the Metro TV Eagle Award winners listed above, this short documentary, Kepala Sekolahku Pemulung (My Schoolmaster the garbage collector), really impressed me.
It was technically well-made and very much in the style of Garin Nugroho's many socio-political documentaries about urban Indonesia. eg Water & Romi - about the river cleaners and the deteriorating state of the waterways around Jakarta.
Kepala Sekolahku Pemulung was made by first-time film makers Jastis Arimba, Victor Doloksaribu, Padri Nadeak, Aline Jusria, Rhino Ariefiansyah and Kioen Moe.
In this short documentary they highlight the fact that despite the politicians boasting that Jakarta has the best education funding, there are still teachers who need to take on meanial second jobs such as garbage collecting, in order to make ends meet. Mahmud is the principal of a junior highschool in the outer suburbs of Jakarta, and this doco follows a day in his life, as he manages the education of his students as well as his second job collecting garbage. What is heartening to see is that this teacher does not feel ashamed, but instead feels proud to be doing something good for his neighborhood, earn a little money on the side, and perhaps open people's eyes to the reality far removed from the office of the politicians. While some of his colleagues would probably take the path of protest marches, he seems to feel that the revolution must begin within yourself.

Mind you things changed a bit after Metro TV aired this film.
Pak Mahmud appeared on the TV show Kick Andy and you can read a bit about that in Nur's blog : http://noerce.blogspot.com/2007/11/kick-an...-sekolahku.html
And you can watch that episode here : http://fxmuchtar.multiply.com/video/item/6...eorang_pemulung

The schoolmaster/garbage collector reminds me of my own work which sees me wearing nice clothes when promoting the Indonesian Film Festival and liaising with the media and film distributors in Melbourne, and then donning rags and dirty overalls for my job as industrial chimney sweep. icon_smile.gif
furansizuka
QUOTE (Ralf @ Feb 22 2010, 07:42 AM) *
The schoolmaster/garbage collector reminds me of my own work which sees me wearing nice clothes when promoting the Indonesian Film Festival and liaising with the media and film distributors in Melbourne, and then donning rags and dirty overalls for my job as industrial chimney sweep. icon_smile.gif


Somebody should make a doco of you! biggthumpup.gif
Ralf
QUOTE (furansizuka @ Feb 23 2010, 12:47 AM) *
Somebody should make a doco of you! biggthumpup.gif
There was a 15 minute segment on the TV show called Australia's Worst Jobs, but they edited out everyone's scenes except the boss Michael O'Connor.
The TV crew felt the story would be more focused with just one character to narrate and anchor the film.
But hey, the Ch31 coverage of the Indonesian Film Festival will have me as the English language media correspondent.
furansizuka
^ Congrats, Ralf beerchug.gif

The 80's box office Gita Cinta is reviving on stage:
http://www.gitacintathemusical.com/
'Gita Cinta': Teen Love to the Tune of the ’80s

For the 70-80's generation Gita Cinta is like the 80's version of Ada Apa Dengan Cinta.
Ralf
A2K MEDIA PTY LTD

A2K Media have announced a deal to distribute Indonesian and Malaysian DVDs in Australia.

Straight from their website, with a bit of extra information from me :

The creators and directors of A2K Media are Ade Djajamihardja and Kate Stephens.
With a strong background in film and television at international level with just about every type of program format, A2K Media has grown to initiate and collaborate in media production with both the local and overseas markets.
A2K Media also works closely with Malaysia, Indonesia and Singapore and promotes the distribution of regional films within Australia.

A2K Media is based in Melbourne, Australia and specialises in production, distribution, events and consulting.
With several exciting projects in both development and production, A2K Media strives to create and facilitate content for all screen platforms that contributes substantive content to society and also excites, engages and inspires.

Ade Djajamihardja's passion and commitment is backed up by years of international media production.
Together with Kate Stephens and A2K Media, they have been running the Australian Malaysian Film Festival and working together with the Indonesian Film Festival in Melbourne.
Joint experience spans events management, industry consultancy, film and television production (Kambing Jantan, Salam Café, Between 2 Skies), CEO Ten on Ten Pictures/Enfiniti Productions Malaysia, SPH Media Works Singapore, Open Channel Melbourne, assistant director ABC, producer MediaCorp Singapore, plus developing industry training packages and tertiary education media studies lectures.


Contact kate@a2kmedia.com.au or call (03) 9530 5314 now and let A2K Media work with you because your ideas deserve it beerchug.gif
materialgurl
congratulation. hopes through films it increase more understanding between indonesia, specifically, and australia.
furansizuka
Tanah Air Beta

Cast: Alexandra Gottardo, Lukman Sardi, Zumi Zola
Premiere: June 2010

I'm anticipating a movie from the Denias producer called Tanah Air Beta (My Fatherland/My Homeland). It takes place in Nusa Tenggara Timur (NTT), the borderline between Indonesia and Timor Leste. So according to Ari Sihasale, the producer, the film will not touch political issue, but rather, he wants to show there are a lot of Timor Leste people who still love Indonesia. The film is based on a true story. About a mother who's searching for her son after they separated since 1999 because of the referendum. Actress Alexandra Gottardo will play the mother. The movie will release on June.
Ralf
Should be good, coming from Ari Sihasale.

Also noticed that Lukman Sardi is in it.
That guy is everywhere. One of the most hard working actors in the industry.
Does he ever take a holiday ?
Majapahitans
QUOTE (furansizuka @ Mar 6 2010, 01:05 PM) *
Tanah Air Beta

Cast: Alexandra Gottardo, Lukman Sardi, Zumi Zola
Premiere: June 2010

I'm anticipating a movie from the Denias producer called Tanah Air Beta (My Fatherland/My Homeland). It takes place in Nusa Tenggara Timur (NTT), the borderline between Indonesia and Timor Leste. So according to Ari Sihasale, the producer, the film will not touch political issue, but rather, he wants to show there are a lot of Timor Leste people who still love Indonesia. The film is based on a true story. About a mother who's searching for her son after they separated since 1999 because of the referendum. Actress Alexandra Gottardo will play the mother. The movie will release on June.


Fascinating..., now film about East Timor from (pro) Indonesian POV....
I'm curious... a counter from Australian "Balibo"?
furansizuka
@ Ralf: Yep, Lukman Sardi is everywhere, at least in good movies. He will play in Merah Putih 2 (sequel) too this year.
@ Majjy: Hmm..it could be.
Kopassus
QUOTE (furansizuka @ Mar 6 2010, 01:05 AM) *
Tanah Air Beta

Cast: Alexandra Gottardo, Lukman Sardi, Zumi Zola
Premiere: June 2010

I'm anticipating a movie from the Denias producer called Tanah Air Beta (My Fatherland/My Homeland). It takes place in Nusa Tenggara Timur (NTT), the borderline between Indonesia and Timor Leste. So according to Ari Sihasale, the producer, the film will not touch political issue, but rather, he wants to show there are a lot of Timor Leste people who still love Indonesia. The film is based on a true story. About a mother who's searching for her son after they separated since 1999 because of the referendum. Actress Alexandra Gottardo will play the mother. The movie will release on June.


Interesting, i expect this film will not enter the Australian cinema's....

What about this movie :
http://www.gundalathemovie.com
Sampai skrg belum dirilis ya...?
furansizuka
Perhaps they're still busy looking for the investors?
Mega
halo apa kabar semua ? saya mega , new comer , salam kenal !!
jadi kapan Tanah Air Beta dirilis di melbourne ?
ada saran mengenai komunitas orang indonesia di melbourne ......
materialgurl
di indonesia aja belum, mbak...
Ralf
QUOTE (Mega @ Mar 12 2010, 08:44 AM) *
halo apa kabar semua ? saya mega , new comer , salam kenal !!
jadi kapan Tanah Air Beta dirilis di melbourne ?
ada saran mengenai komunitas orang indonesia di melbourne ......
Hi Mega and welcome to Asia Finest Forum.
Indonesian Film Festival Inc. may be able to bring Ari Sihasale's new film to Australia, but we are seeking more sponsorship.
Mira Lesmana was in town for last weekend's screening of Sang Pemimpi.




Mira Lesmana has returned home to Jakarta, but she is keeping herself busy.
She will be hosting a film festival honouring Indonesian international student graduates.

QUOTE
OZMATE (Australian Alumni Network) presents:

AUSTRALIAN ALUMNI SHORT FILM FESTIVAL 2010

For everyone with Australian connections!
Don't miss this ONE NIGHT ONLY event celebrating the talents and achievements of Australian Alumni in film industry in Indonesia!

Saturday 20 March 2010 5:00-10:00pm
Pusat Perfilman Haji Usmar Ismail
Jl HR Rasuna Said Kav C-22 Kuningan, Jakarta

Opened by Mira Lesmana and Musical Performance by Adrian Adioetomo
Featuring films by The Mo Brothers, Sigi Wimala, Wahyu Aditya, Andra Fembriarto and many more..!

BUY YOUR TICKETS NOW! Limited seats.
Rp50,000 includes screening, talk show, music, food and fun!

TICKETING:
Transfer to Melisa G Simanjuntak (BCA-5045008590).
Fax copy of transfer slip, name, contact details and number of tickets to 62 -21 25505572.

INFO: Melisa 62-21 2550 5553 / Nonni 0811 1890871 or melisa.simanjuntak@aei.gov.au

http://www.ozmate.org






On the subject of great film makers, Akira Kurosawa would be celebrating his 100th birthday today if he were still alive. beerchug.gif
The first Kurosawa film I ever saw was not one of his over-represented samurai epics, but way back in highschool we had a teacher who championed individual idealism versus corporate greed, and hence the class watched The Bad Sleep Well.
materialgurl
upcoming movie:
At the Very Bottom of Everything (Di Dasar Segalanya)

Getting to the very bottom


Film director Paul Agusta was depressed and had just been admitted to a sanitarium after a failed suicide attempt when he wrote the dark and poignant film, At the Very Bottom of Everything (Di Dasar Segalanya).

From his journal, he wrote the script based on his own experience with bipolar disorder. The result was a tale of a young woman's grueling struggle with the fluctuations of extreme euphoria and deep depression.

The film's raw scenes are filled with confronting visuals, such as a thin, wounded man devoured by human rats and a woman freeing herself from being chained to a cross. Using experimental techniques, such as camera handling that goes in and out of focus and stop motions, Paul said he attempted to depict the visuals of his nightmares.

After being screened at the International Film Festival in Rotterdam, Paul's second feature-length film finally premiered last Friday at Kineforum, Jakarta Arts Council (DKJ).

Paul said he was more nervous about having the film screened in his home country than abroad.

"Honestly, I was scared half to death. I'm more nervous than I was when the film was screened in Rotterdam. There, I will never see 95 percent of the people again in my life. Here, there are other filmmakers that I will see over and over again," he said.

The film did attract different reactions from the audience. In the discussion with the film crew afterwards, amid several comments praising the film, a 22-year-old man, who professed that he also suffered from depression, said that he was worried that some people with depression might be fixated on the darkest and most depressing scenes of the film.

"I've had problems with depression, although maybe not as extreme. Some people might just want to choose the scenes according to what they feel and I'm worried that might trigger something," he said.

Paul responded by saying that as a filmmaker, he could not control the reaction of the audience and did not think the director and actors were responsible for that.

The film, divided into 10 chapters, depicts the stages of Paul illness. "In great detail, as much as possible," he said.

The film's first scenes start with actress and musician Kartika Jahja, popularly called Tika, narrating her story.

"What do you get at the very bottom of everything?" asked her character after continuing to explain there was a sense of comfort at the bottom, a finality that one would no longer fall.

At this point, the choice to remain or start climbing is made.

One of the audience members asked why the film sometimes felt like it dragged on.

Tika said that was because that is exactly what a low episode of depression felt like.

"It is dragging. You want it to end because it's tiring when you're in one of your down or manic episodes. You just want everything to end quickly. And sometimes the body can't even resist even though you've taken medication," she said.

Kartika, who herself suffers from the same illness, co-wrote the script with Paul Poet Leon Agusta, Paul's father, also contributed to the writing. Kartika, translated Paul's English-draft and modeled the script into a more realistic and less self-indulgent script, Paul said.

"The easy part was, as basic creative writing teaches, write what you know. And boy did I know about this. The hard part was to convey it so people without making them feel pity. I don't want people to pity people with the illness," he said.

Both Paul and Tika said the film was aimed at helping people understand more about bipolar disorder. Many people who suffer from bipolar disorder might not realize that they suffer from it, Tika said.

"In Indonesia, because mental health is not really taken seriously, a lot of the cases end up tragically," she said.

Basic healthcare research conducted by the Indonesian Health Ministry in 2007 revealed that 11.6 percent of adults in Indonesia suffered from some form of mental or emotional disorder, such as depression and anxiety. A 2002 study by the World Health Organization (WHO) found that neuropsychiatric disorders and self-inflicted injuries were the leading cause of a decrease in quality of life in Indonesia.

The film is slated to be screened at Salihara art center on April 9.

Tika said that when Paul asked her to play the part of the narrator, she was scared.

"I had to revisit the darkest moments of my life," she said. The two-day shoot of her part, she said was physically and emotionally draining.

For his next project, Paul said he would be collaborating with Tika again, this time with her as co-director. In the new project, Moonlight and the Company You Keep, Paul will leave his experimental leanings and work to a conventional drama.

"My itch for experimenting has gone. This one will be a simple story about six friends in a five day period," he said.
furansizuka
RI and Australia build ties through film

Andrea Booth , Contributor , Jakarta | Sat, 03/27/2010 12:40 PM | Art and Design

A floating red balloon. The poignant crush between boys. A malfunctioning chainsaw, and a US$1 boat to navigate Jakarta floods.

These colorful images were prominent features at the Australian Alumni Film Festival 2010 last weekend at the Usmar Ismail Film Industry Center in South Jakarta.

If you thought Australian and Indonesian relations were stifled with hostility, the event was testament to the fact that both are working to strengthen ties. Saturday evening was packed with talented Indonesians' filmmaking skills they learned down under.

"Australia and Indonesia can better connect through the arts," Indonesian director Mira Lesmana told The Jakarta Post. "Film can help provide a means to strengthen ties between the neighbors."

Mira, who opened the festival showcasing eight selected shorts, is regarded as a strong presence in the country's film industry. With her production company Miles Films, she has produced many well-received films such as Ada apa dengan Cinta, (What's up with Cinta) Eliana, Eliana and the more recent Laskar Pelangi (The Rainbow Warriors).

Whenever she traveled to Australia, Mira said, she met many fellow countrymen studying film. "There are many Indonesians in Australia who have a great interest in film. We are proud to be Australian Alumni."

The event was a collaboration between the Australian Embassy, OzMate - a social networking website exclusive to Indonesians studying in Australia - and Radio Australia, committed to bridging the gap between Indonesia and Australia.

For Indonesian filmmakers, who graduated from Australian universities and institutes, the night was filled with creativity and camaraderie, providing youths with the opportunity to further boost the nation's film industry.

Director Andra Fembriarto said he was proud his film was selected at the festival. His film, Jakarta 2012, satirized the willingness to adapt to a problem rather than solve it, such as the case of Jakarta's floods.

The University of Technology Sydney (UTS) graduate said he chose to study in Australia because of the quality of the university's media program. He added he wanted to use his skills to contribute to the growth of the Indonesian film industry.

"Events like this are also great to network, I hope there are more of them," he said.

Andra also said that Indonesia and Australia could benefit from working in collaboration.

"Both countries have many rich stories and skills they can provide one another."

He also pointed to the fact that this was a good time for Australia and Indonesia to begin working with one another because Australia was undergoing a shift in paradigm.

"It is moving from perceiving itself as a Western country to one that values its location in the East more."

Another filmmaker at the event, Wahyu Aditya, also founder and CEO of animation school HelloMotion Academy, said Indonesians greatly benefited from their ties with the Australian arts community because it broadened their perspective. Wahyu studied at the KvB Institute of Technology in North Sydney.

"Australia's link with the Western world gives Indonesia the opportunity to be exposed to new ideas," he said.

Wahyu's comedic animation Tahi Sapi Atau Bukan (Bull $hit or not) followed the quest of three friends to determine the identity of the brown gob they stumbled upon.

"I want animation to become a lifestyle," he said of the genre. "One reason I created my film academy was to provide a large network of people to strengthen collaboration and further develop the animation genre."

Young filmmaker Debora Christy, whose Where is my Red-Heart Shaped Balloon short was shown, said she was committed to using the skills she learned at UTS in Indonesia to tell the stories that mattered.

"Indonesia has many interesting and important stories it can tell through film," she asserted.

Mira Lesmana, who studied at the Australian International Independent School and then at the Jakarta Arts Institute, Indonesia, agreed.

"The selected shorts incorporate a variety of themes, which is great as we need many exchanges," she said. "There are thousands of stories to be told.

"The people selected tonight - independent, creative intellectuals - have the ability to communicate fresh ideas and the issues that need voicing."

However, she said that despite Indonesians arriving back in the country with their newfound skills, as well as the rapid growth the country's film industry over the past 12 years, it encountered many problems concerning the national film law.

"Indonesians must continue to fight it, but it's events like this, filled with unhindered creativity, that are inspiring for the industry."

Mira said another problem was filmmakers often did not have the opportunity to maximize their exposure.

"This type of initiative is a positive way to showcase the work of upcoming filmmakers.

"I've noticed sometimes filmmakers find it hard to connect with the movies they produce, but these filmmakers have engaged fully. One prominent theme discussed in some of these shorts - Indonesians adjusting to Australia - is one they are quite passionate about."

Building the relationship between Australia and Indonesia and working together was a sentiment felt by festivalgoers that evening. However, Mira emphasized stories and form must be contemporary and relevant if people were to engage.

Shannon Smith, education counselor at the Australian Embassy, believes Indonesian film is on the right track.

"Indonesian storytelling is modern," he said. "It's a modern country and its films are progressive, dealing with topics from sexuality to the topical environmental issue."

Shannon added that while many people were involved in the arts in Indonesia, he saw the need to make it more visible. "This event is part of the effort to better expose it."

Kimo Stamboel of the Mo Brothers, who showed short film Dara, which was made into the 2009 feature Rumah Dara (Dara's home), capped the spirit of the festival.

"Indonesia and Australia can produce great films by sharing their respective skills and working together."
Ralf
QUOTE (furansizuka @ Apr 5 2010, 11:12 PM) *
"Australia and Indonesia can better connect through the arts," Indonesian director Mira Lesmana told The Jakarta Post. "Film can help provide a means to strengthen ties between the neighbors."
100% agree......pop culture builds bridges between vastly different people from a young age......something politicians have rarely achieved.

QUOTE (furansizuka @ Apr 5 2010, 11:12 PM) *
Whenever she traveled to Australia, Mira said, she met many fellow countrymen studying film. "There are many Indonesians in Australia who have a great interest in film. We are proud to be Australian Alumni."
The event was a collaboration between the Australian Embassy, OzMate - a social networking website exclusive to Indonesians studying in Australia - and Radio Australia, committed to bridging the gap between Indonesia and Australia.
For Indonesian filmmakers, who graduated from Australian universities and institutes, the night was filled with creativity and camaraderie, providing youths with the opportunity to further boost the nation's film industry.
Wish I could have gone to Ozmate's Australian Alumni Film Fest.

QUOTE (furansizuka @ Apr 5 2010, 11:12 PM) *
"Both countries have many rich stories and skills they can provide one another", said director Andra Fembriarto.
He also pointed to the fact that this was a good time for Australia and Indonesia to begin working with one another because Australia was undergoing a shift in paradigm.
"It is moving from perceiving itself as a Western country to one that values its location in the East more."
Yeah, definitely we are heading that way.

QUOTE (furansizuka @ Apr 5 2010, 11:12 PM) *
Kimo Stamboel of the Mo Brothers, who showed short film Dara, which was made into the 2009 feature Rumah Dara (aka Macabre), capped the spirit of the festival.
"Indonesia and Australia can produce great films by sharing their respective skills and working together."
When I spoke with Timo and Sigi at last year's IFF, they were so hopeful that their wild horror romp would be the first Indonesian film to break commercially into the Australian market through Madman Entertainment.
Madman has a huge catalogue of Asian horror movies, but alas they turned down the Mo Brothers.
Lack of commercial viability was cited. confused.gif
There was a time when the founders of Madman Entertainment, Paul Wiegard and Tim Anderson, were the champions of indie, cutting-edge and cult...... but those days seem to have given way to the comforts of a conservative middle age life. thumbsdown.gif
furansizuka
Indonesian Movie Awards 2010
Date: May 05. 2010
Place: JITEC,
Participants: 36 Films
Award: 15 Piala Layar Emas (Golden Screen award) for 7 favorite categories & 8 best categories. There'll be Special Award for Best Children Artist too.

Note: Jermal gets the most nominations (6 categories)

Nominees for Indonesian Movie Awards 2010 :

Best category:


1. Best Leading Actor :

Didi Petet( Jermal)
Mamiek Prakoso (King)
Mathias Muchus (Queen Bee)
Oka Antara (Hari Untuk Amanda)
Tio Pakusadewo (Identitas)


2. Best Leading Actress :

Atiqah Hasiholan (Jamila dan Sang Presiden)
Aty Kanser (Emak Ingin Naik Haji)
Fanny Fabriana (Hari Untuk Amanda)
Leony V. H. (Identitas)
Tika Putri (Queen Bee)


3. Best Supporting Actor :

Deddy Mizwar (Ketika Cinta Bertasbih 2)
Dwi Sasono (Wakil Rakyat)
Oka Antara (Queen Bee)
Verdi Solaiman (Ruma Maida)
Yayu A. W. Unru (Jermal)


4. Best Supporting Actress :

Ayu Pratiwi (Emak Ingin Naik Haji)
Christine Hakim (Merantau)
Fanny Fabriana (Serigala Terakhir)
Meriam Bellina (Get Married 2)
Niniek L. Karim (Ketika Cinta Bertasbih 2)


5. Best New Actor:

Chairil A. Dalimunthe (Jermal)
Iko Uwais (Merantau)
Kholidi Asadil Alam (Ketika Cinta Bertasbih 1)
Nazril Ilham (Sang Pemimpi)
Yayan Ruhian (Merantau)


6. Best New Actress :

Meyda Sefira (Ketika Cinta Bertasbih 1)
Oki Setiana Dewi (Ketika Cinta Bertasbih 1)
Olivia Lubis Jensen (Bukan Cinta Biasa)
Rahmi Nurullina (Ketika Cinta Bertasbih 1)


7. Best Couple in a movie :

Didi Petet dan Iqbal S. Manurung (Jermal)
Oka Antara dan Fanny Fabriana (Hari Untuk Amanda)
Tio Pakusadewo dan Rachel Amanda (Kata Maaf Terakhir)
Vino G. Bastian dan Reza Pahlevi (Serigala Terakhir)
Yama Carlos dan Atiqah Hasiholan (Ruma Maida)


8. Special Awards (Best Children Artist) :
Aldo Tansani (Garuda di Dadaku)
Amir Mahira (Garuda di Dadaku)
Iqbal S. Manurung (Jermal)
Amanda (Kata Maaf Terakhir)
Rangga Aditya (King)


Most Favorite :

1. Most Fave Leading Actor :

Didi Petet (Jermal)
Mamiek Prakoso (King)
Mathias Muchus (Queen Bee)
Oka Antara (Hari Untuk Amanda)
Tio Pakusadewo (Identitas)


2. Most Fave Leading Actress :
Atiqah Hasiholan (Jamila dan Sang Presiden)
Aty Kanser (Emak Ingin Naik Haji)
Fanny Fabriana (Hari Untuk Amanda)
Leony V. H. (Identitas)
Tika Putri (Queen Bee)


3. Most Fave New Actor :

Chairil A. Dalimunthe (Jermal)
Iko Uwais (Merantau)
Kholidi Asadil Alam (Ketika Cinta Bertasbih 1)
Nazril Ilham (Sang Pemimpi)
Yayan Ruhian (Merantau)


4. Most Fave New Actress :
Meyda Sefira (Ketika Cinta Bertasbih 1)
Oki Setiana Dewi (Ketika Cinta Bertasbih 1)
Olivia Lubis Jensen (Bukan Cinta Biasa)
Rahmi Nurullina (Ketika Cinta Bertasbih 1)


5. Most Fave Couple in a movie :

Didi Petet dan Iqbal S. Manurung (Jermal)
Oka Antara dan Fanny Fabriana (Hari Untuk Amanda)
Tio Pakusadewo dan Rachel Amanda (Kata Maaf Terakhir)
Vino G. Bastian dan Reza Pahlevi (Serigala Terakhir)
Yama Carlos dan Atiqah Hasiholan (Ruma Maida)


6. Most Fave Soundtrack :

Bukan CInta Biasa (Afgan)
Garuda Di Dadaku (Netral)
Ketika Cinta Bertasbih (Melly Goeslaw dan Amee)
Main Serong (The Changcuters)
Sang Pemimpi (GIGI)


7. Most Fave Film :

King
Emak Ingin Naik Haji
Garuda Di Dadaku
Get Married 2
Identitas
Jamila dan Sang Presiden
Jermal
Ketika Cinta Bertasbih 2
Ruma Maida
Sang Pemimpi
londoh
QUOTE (furansizuka @ Feb 6 2010, 12:06 AM) *
Also taking critical notes are the first Indonesian colossal war film Merah Putih,
Now let the good times roll!



When I was in Indonesia I have been looking for a dvd of this Merah-Putih movie but no one seems to have heard of that film, did it flop ??
XxRyoChanxX
^ they will be playing MERAH PUTIH at a FILM FESTIVAL in the US, I forgot what the Film Festival is called.
Sumpit
QUOTE (XxRyoChanxX @ Apr 16 2010, 05:31 PM) *
^ they will be playing MERAH PUTIH at a FILM FESTIVAL in the US, I forgot what the Film Festival is called.



bought it on dvd ..haven't watched it yet
kinda strange that the bule & tionghua are having the leadroles
Majapahitans
QUOTE (Sumpit @ Apr 16 2010, 10:38 PM) *
bought it on dvd ..haven't watched it yet
kinda strange that the bule & tionghua are having the leadroles


Never have watched it yet... maybe I should buy the DVD...

Neway my fave Indonesian war movied is the vintage "Doea Tanda Mata" (1985)

great songs and music

Another is "Kereta Terakhir" (I can't find the picture in the net), it is about Republiken train journey from Jakarta to Yogyakarta. In the journey the Dutch fighter planes always shoot at them. And they hide in train tunnel in Kroya... Kinda cool vintage movie actually...


I remember watch "Janur Kuning" (1979) loong time ago, it's played all over again for years.

Sure it's full of Suharto's New Order propaganda $hits, but it's part of our history....

and "Oeroeg" (1993) it's a Dutch film...




"So those brown monkeys can not yell 'mardheeka' again..!"
"It's 'merdeka' captain...''


I enjoyed the Netherlands soldier POV on Indonesian Revolution, how he actually love Indies as his chilhood heaven lost in the midst of war...
PISANG GOREENG...! laugh.gif


I'm interested on examining Japanese pov.... "Murudeka 17805"

"Nihon no tame ni tattakatte..., kondo wa Indoneshia no tame ni...."

merdeka 17805 trailer

I love the magic of cinema..., it brings the story of different human beings... and the Indonesian Revolution is indeed fascinating theme for Indonesian, Dutch, and Japanese....
Grandmaster C
so did anyone see Arisan Brondong? is it funny or what...
Ralf
At this point I think I'm really gonna need a funny movie.
ShadowDealer
I am new to this site so i am not sure if this is right - but if it is, I am interested in the Indonesia film Festival. Ralf, can you please give me details regarding the festival please? Thanks so much
materialgurl
QUOTE (londoh @ Apr 16 2010, 09:28 PM) *
When I was in Indonesia I have been looking for a dvd of this Merah-Putih movie but no one seems to have heard of that film, did it flop ??


the film was lost from Merantau biggrin.gif but it reached moderate number of viewers in jakarta. the dvd just released last month. go check it out in disctarra store or carrefour.
materialgurl
Sang Pemimpi wins Singapore International Film Festival 2010 and receives NETPAC award
Ralf
QUOTE (furansizuka @ Apr 17 2010, 01:23 AM) *
Indonesian Movie Awards 2010........
I am surprised that Lukman Sardi's name did not come up. He seems to be in every second movie that's released.




QUOTE (ShadowDealer @ Apr 25 2010, 02:49 AM) *
I am new to this site so i am not sure if this is right - but if it is, I am interested in the Indonesia Film Festival. Ralf, can you please give me details regarding the festival please? Thanks so much
Welcome to the forum. I'm assuming you mean the 2010 Indo film fest in Aus ?
The film fest I am involved with is going to run in Melbourne at ACMI 20-26 August, and in Sydney at Event Cinemas 26-29 August.
The full festival program is still under wraps and will not be announced until 20 July..... but I can tell you it's gonna be good icon_wink.gif
Stay tuned here for rumours and teasers. deal.gif
Grandmaster C
a coupla days ago i was shocked to see an indonesian movie on dutch television.
it was Gie with nic sap.
found out an hour too late tho otherwise i would've checked it out.
movie any good? it had a bad rating at our tv guide but a 7,7 at imdb...
Ralf
QUOTE (Grandmaster C @ Apr 28 2010, 02:16 AM) *
a coupla days ago i was shocked to see an indonesian movie on dutch television.
it was Gie with nic sap.
found out an hour too late tho otherwise i would've checked it out.
movie any good? it had a bad rating at our tv guide but a 7,7 at imdb...
The drawcard of this movie is Nico.
In real life Nicholas Saputra is an articulate and charismatic man, and as such he is ideal for playing the role of the famous student political activist Soe Hok Gie.
Nico and the film makers went into great detail researching the characters and the history, and even collaborated with Gie's brother who works in Melbourne University.
However the movie shows a typically old-fashioned Indonesian "softly softly" approach to highly controversial and fiery times in the history of this proud young nation.
The film never really comes alive and the screenplay tip-toes around the edges of the divisive politics, as if it wants to avoid upsetting anybody.
The central character of Gie is reverently portrayed as a noble hero in search of truth, but once again the screenplay makes his character vague, aloof and ambiguous.
Riri Riza's Gie is more of a symbol than a real flesh and blood teenager living in the 60s.
The film kind of drags on, making political platitudes without any real conviction.

Grandmaster C
i see. thanks hehe.
Grandmaster C
menculik miyabi
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LKrNw_6Cxz4
check out that dude at 01:14 hhahahahahahhahaha!!!
Majapahitans
QUOTE (Grandmaster C @ May 7 2010, 07:39 PM) *
menculik miyabi
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LKrNw_6Cxz4
check out that dude at 01:14 hhahahahahahhahaha!!!


Hahaha begooo...! kocak bangget..!!! harus nonton nih...!!! laugh.gif

Monas...? Ooh it's BIG..!
Kresna
QUOTE (Grandmaster C @ Apr 27 2010, 03:16 PM) *
a coupla days ago i was shocked to see an indonesian movie on dutch television.
it was Gie with nic sap.
found out an hour too late tho otherwise i would've checked it out.
movie any good? it had a bad rating at our tv guide but a 7,7 at imdb...

It was extremely boring.
Grandmaster C
hahhahaha ok biggrin.gif
londoh
QUOTE (materialgurl @ Apr 27 2010, 01:48 AM) *
the film was lost from Merantau biggrin.gif but it reached moderate number of viewers in jakarta. the dvd just released last month. go check it out in disctarra store or carrefour.



I am back in my homeland so difficult to buy. I have found it on Rapidshare and loaded it down. Tahnks anyway
MovieGuide
Hello my friend,

heart.gif Please share...
Last year movie call "Merantau" are famous in the world. Then I think Indonesian movies become interesting.
So I would like to invite you all to Thai Chat, Please recommend us another movies in this page.
http://www.asiafinest.com/forum/index.php?...14692&st=40


Thank you very much

movieguide : )
materialgurl
again..Sang Pemimpi won 3rd place for Audience Awards @ Udine Far East Film Festival, Italy.
DutchEastIndiesMan
@Londoh

do you have a link to it or a torrent ? All the file sharing websites i found with the film wants me to sign up...

NVM saw it.....BADDDDDDDDDD film, didn't even finish it. No wonder it didn't win for whatever prize to Merantau.
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