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CAsian
When I was in India I was surprised a lot because I found some traces of Central Asian influence.
For example, bread is called "tandur nan" while bread in CA is called "nan". When made in the special clay oven ("tandyr") it is called "tandyr nan". Indians have a dish called "pilaf" (not sure of spelling). We call it "palau/pilav".
The Indians use the word "janym" which is wide spread throughout CA. It means "my soul" in turkic languages.
I understood that there were some words of Iranian/Arabian origin common for Turkic people and Indians like: mahabbat (love), kitap (book), duken (shop). In Cashmir people call pants by the word "salvar". We call them "shalbar". I wonder is it turkic word borrowed from iranians or vice versa.

May be urdu has more turkic words than any other language in the South Asia?
Satrai
QUOTE (CAsian @ Aug 19 2011, 11:13 AM) *
When I was in India I was surprised a lot because I found some traces of Central Asian influence.
For example, bread is called "tandur nan" while bread in CA is called "nan". When made in the special clay oven ("tandyr") it is called "tandyr nan". Indians have a dish called "pilaf" (not sure of spelling). We call it "palau/pilav".
The Indians use the word "janym" which is wide spread throughout CA. It means "my soul" in turkic languages.
I understood that there were some words of Iranian/Arabian origin common for Turkic people and Indians like: mahabbat (love), kitap (book), duken (shop). In Cashmir people call pants by the word "salvar". We call them "shalbar". I wonder is it turkic word borrowed from iranians or vice versa.

May be urdu has more turkic words than any other language in the South Asia?


These words stem from the period in which the Arabs and Moghuls came to India to destroy thousands of years of Hindu civilization and kill tens of millions of people. No they didnot come in peace. A strange thing is that the Nazi-Holocaust is known over the whole world but the Hindu-holocaust is not. Luckily they did not succeed.
Ok.

There are quite a lot of words borrowed from Arab or Persian used in India. You already mentioned Mahabbat (love), kitap (book). Some other words are insaan (human), aurat (woman) and zindagi (life), ghwab (dream).
The original Indian equivalents for these words are (Sanskrit): Pyar (love), pustak (book), manushya (human), stri (woman) and jiewan (life), sapna (dream).
CAsian
QUOTE (Satrai @ Aug 19 2011, 05:52 AM) *
These words stem from the period in which the Arabs and Moghuls came to India to destroy thousands of years of Hindu civilization and kill tens of millions of people. No they didnot come in peace. A strange thing is that the Nazi-Holocaust is known over the whole world but the Hindu-holocaust is not. Luckily they did not succeed.
Ok.

I did not know about big-scale killing of people in India. Sorry, I can not say anything about it. But how the Moghuls could kill millions of people if they were not so numerous? It's just impossible.

As for culture it seems that they did influence it considerably, IMHO. Taj-Mahal was built by them, wasn't it?


AsiaticGlory
I see more South Asians than Turkic-Mongol people with "Khan" as a last name.
CAsian
QUOTE (AsiaticGlory @ Aug 19 2011, 08:07 PM) *
I see more South Asians than Turkic-Mongol people with "Khan" as a last name.

yes, it's true.
At the end of the name Central Asians also like "bek" (noble person) or "bye" (rich).

The Red Fort palace reminded me the palace of Sultan Akhmet in Istanbul.
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